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Devices With Linux: Pocket Science Lab, Librem 5 GNU/Linux Phone and Android Alternatives

tuxmachines.org - Čet, 07/04/2019 - 19:25
  • Case label for Pocket Science Lab V5

    In case you haven’t heard about it, Pocket Science Lab [1] is a really nifty board developed by the FOSSAsia community which combines a multichannel, megahertz-range oscilloscope, a multimeter, a logic probe, several voltage sources and a current source, several wave generators, UART and I2C interfaces… and all of this in the form factor of an Arduino Mega, i.e. only somewhat larger than that of a credit card. Hook it up over USB to a PC or an Android device running the official (free and open source, of course) app and you are all set.

    Well, not quite set yet. What you get for your 50-ish EUR is just the board itself. You will quite definitely need a set of probe cables (sadly, I have yet to find even an unofficial adaptor allowing one to equip PSLab with standard industry oscilloscope probes using BNC connectors) but if you expect to lug yours around anywhere you go, you will quite definitely want to invest in a case of some sort. While FOSSAsia does not to my knowledge sell PSLab cases, they provide a design for one [2]. It is meant to be laser-cut but I have successfully managed to 3D-print it as well, and for the more patient among us it shouldn’t be too difficult to hand-cut one with a jigsaw either.

  • To Little Surprise, Many Linux Apps Run On The Librem 5 Linux Smartphone

    Now being into Q3, we're waiting to see if Purism will be able to deliver the Librem 5 GNU/Linux smartphone this quarter after being pushed back twice from their original January ship date. They haven't released any finished design yet or the finalized specifications (they still haven't finalized on the RAM, battery, cameras, and speaker(s)), but their latest series of blog posts are showing that GNOME/Linux applications can run on their Librem 5 developer kit.

    Following their posts showing off the boot time compared to an obsolete Android smartphone and Quake II can run on their Linux smartphone, they have been highlighting other applications that can run on the phone -- well, their developer kit.

  • Can I buy a phone that doesn’t use anything from Google or Apple?

    South Korea’s two smartphone manufacturers, Samsung and LG, would also love to have an independent operating system but success is unlikely. Samsung tried with Tizen, which was supported by the Linux Foundation. The Samsung Z series was launched in India and didn’t do well enough but Tizen is used in Samsung Gear smartwatches. LG could have a go with Palm’s Linux-based webOS, which it acquired from HP in 2013. WebOS first appeared on Palm Pre smartphones in 2009 but LG has mainly used it in smart TV sets.

    Sailfish started with another failed Linux project, Nokia and Intel’s MeeGo. The latest version uses a graphical shell from Jolla, the Finnish company that appears to be its major backer. Sailfish can be ported to more alternative smartphones than Ubuntu Touch but I can’t see any current phones with Sailfish pre-installed. The same is true for both /e/ (formerly Eelo), which is a sort of de-Googled Android, and LineageOS, which is a reborn CyanogenMod.

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Windows 'Clones'

tuxmachines.org - Čet, 07/04/2019 - 19:21
  • ReactOS ‘a ripoff of the Windows Research Kernel’ claims Microsoft kernel engineer

    Reitschin does add he is no lawyer, but these claims do raise a number of serious concerns and questions about the ReactOS project. These claims alone will probably ensure no serious commercial entity will ever want to associate itself with ReactOS, and it will be interesting to see if these claims will ever lead to something more serious than mere words.

  • ReactOS 'a ripoff of the Windows Research Kernel' claims Microsoft kernel engineer [Ed: The original article is from Microsoft Tim.]
  • Samba 4.11 Aims To Be Scalable To 100,000+ Users

    For those using Samba for better Windows interoperability with SMB/CIFS/AD, the forthcoming Samba 4.11 will be a lot more scalable so it can be used within massive organizations.

    Samba has been undergoing work to improve its performance on the large scale for organizations with 100,000+ users and over one hundred thousand computer objects and memberships. Samba 4.11 will be able to scale a hell of a lot better than previous releases due to performance improvements around reindexing, domain joins, LDAP server memory, custom LMBD map size, better batch operation support, better LDB search performance, better sub-tree rename performance, and other tuning to allow Samba to perform at massive scales.

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Security Leftovers

tuxmachines.org - Čet, 07/04/2019 - 19:19
  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (libssh2 and qemu-kvm), Debian (lemonldap-ng), Fedora (tomcat), Oracle (kernel), and SUSE (elfutils, kernel, and php5).

  • Many VMware Products Affected by SACK Linux Vulnerabilities
  • YouTube Bans ‘Hacking And Phishing’ Videos; Pisses Off Infosec Guys

    As the number of users on the platform has increased over the years, so has YouTube’s list of ‘banned content.’ Adding further to the list, YouTube has banned ‘instructional hacking and phishing’ videos.

    The latest bans have led to the deletion of several educational videos on ethical hacking as they now violate YouTube’s Terms of Service. The list also includes ‘extremely dangerous challenges,’ ‘eating disorders’ and ‘violent events’ as banned categories.

  • This Android Malware ‘Records’ Your Screen To ‘Steal’ Banking Details

    Creators behind malicious malware are evolving and coming up with new techniques to make it almost impossible for a normal user to spot them. A new banking trojan named BianLian, which was previously used as a dropper for spreading notorious banking malware like Anubis is affecting Android users all over the world.

  • New Golang malware plays the Linux field in quest for cryptocurrency [Ed: The CBS tech tabloid ZDNet (with Microsoft funding and running it) continues to associate "Linux" with some malware one needs to actually install]

    A new form of malware has been spotted in the wild by cybersecurity companies which say the code's main focus is the fraudulent mining of the Monero (XMR) cryptocurrency.

  • 10 Best Free Password Manager Software For 2019 [Ed: A site called "FOSS" something recommends proprietary software and worse -- sending all your passwords to some dodgy entity called LastPass (while calling it "free"!)]

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Valve’s new code cuts AMD GPU compile times by over 45% for Linux games

tuxmachines.org - Čet, 07/04/2019 - 18:39

AMD graphics cards are getting some Linux love from what might seem like an unlikely source: Valve. Source. Valve. C’mon… Whatever. A team of software engineers in Valve has been working on a new shader compiler for AMD GPUs running on Linux operating systems, and it promises dramatically shorter time to compile metrics as well as a few cases where it’s making a positive difference to gaming frame rates on Linux too.

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LWN's Latest: An OpenSUSE 'Foundation', Security, Programming and Kernel (Linux)

tuxmachines.org - Čet, 07/04/2019 - 18:30
  • An openSUSE foundation proposal

    The idea of spinning openSUSE out into a foundation is not new; it has come up multiple times along the way. The most recent push started back in April at two separate board meetings where it was discussed. It picked up steam during a board meeting at the openSUSE Conference 2019 in late May. While waiting for the outcome from that meeting (though there was a panel session with the board [YouTube] at the conference where some of the thinking was discussed), the community discussed ideas for a name for the foundation (and, possibly, the project itself). Now, board member Simon Lees has posted a draft of the foundation proposal for review.

    The proposal outlines the current thinking of the board. It notes that the move to a foundation is not meant to pull away from SUSE, "but to add more capabilities to the openSUSE Project". In particular, having a separate entity will allow the project to "receive and provide sponsorships (in terms of money, hardware, or contracted services)". Currently, any kind of agreement between the project and some other organization has to be done via SUSE, which can complicate those efforts. The new foundation would be able to partner with others, receive donations, spend money, and sign contracts with venues, service providers, and the like, all on behalf of the openSUSE project.

    SUSE would clearly have a role in the new foundation; the board is requesting some funding to set up the organization as well as one or two people to help with the administrative side. The new foundation's board would take the place of the existing project board, with the same election rules as there are today (which results in a board of six, five elected from the members of the project and the chair appointed by SUSE).

    The board is looking at setting up a German stiftung foundation as the legal entity for the new organization, though that was not clearly specified in the draft proposal. An eingetragener Verein (e. V.) was considered, but the structure of that type of entity is inflexible; in addition, the purpose of an e. V. can be changed if there was a "hostile takeover" at some point. Umbrella organizations (e.g. the Linux Foundation) and simply keeping things the same were also looked at, but were deemed unworkable for various reasons.

    There is also a handful of open questions, including logistical issues such as whether SUSE or the new foundation would own the IT infrastructure, trademarks, and so on. Also, who would be responsible (in a GDPR sense) for the project's data collection and storage. The biggest open issue is to create a charter for the foundation, which requires legal advice. The Document Foundation (TDF) is something of a model for what openSUSE is trying to achieve; it is also a stiftung and shares some of the attributes with the proposed structure.

  • CVE-less vulnerabilities

    More bugs in free software are being found these days, which is good for many reasons, but there are some possible downsides to that as well. In addition, projects like OSS-Fuzz are finding lots of bugs in an automated fashion—many of which may be security relevant. The sheer number of bugs being reported is overwhelming many (most?) free-software projects, which simply do not have enough eyeballs to fix, or even triage, many of the reports they receive. A discussion about that is currently playing out on the oss-security mailing list.

  • C, Fortran, and single-character strings

    The calling interfaces between programming languages are, by their nature, ripe for misunderstandings; different languages can have subtly different ideas of how data should be passed around. Such misunderstandings often have the effect of making things break right away; these are quickly fixed. Others can persist for years or even decades before jumping out of the shadows and making things fail. A problem of the latter variety recently turned up in how some C programs are passing strings to Fortran subroutines, with unpleasant effects on widely used packages like LAPACK.

    The C language famously does not worry much about the length of strings, which simply extend until the null byte at the end. Fortran, though, likes to know the sizes of the strings it is dealing with. When strings are passed as arguments to functions or subroutines, the GCC Fortran argument-passing conventions state that the length of each string is to be appended to the list of arguments. 

  • Statistics from the 5.2 kernel — and before

    As of this writing, just over 13,600 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline repository for the 5.2 development cycle. The time has come, once again, for a look at where that work came from and who supported it. There are some unique aspects to 5.2 that have thrown off some of the usual numbers.
    1,716 developers contributed changes for the 5.2 kernel, 245 of whom made their first contribution during this cycle. Those 1,716 developers removed nearly 490,000 lines of code, which is a lot, but the addition of 596,000 new lines of code means that the kernel still grew by 106,000 lines. 

  • Lockdown as a security module

    Technologies like UEFI secure boot are intended to guarantee that a locked-down system is running the software intended by its owner (for a definition of "owner" as "whoever holds the signing key recognized by the firmware"). That guarantee is hard to uphold, though, if a program run on the system in question is able to modify the running kernel somehow. Thus, proponents of secure-boot technologies have been trying for years to provide the ability to lock down many types of kernel functionality on secure systems. The latest attempt posted by Matthew Garrett, at an eyebrow-raising version 34, tries to address previous concerns by putting lockdown under the control of a Linux security module (LSM).
    The lockdown patches have a long and controversial history; LWN first wrote about them in 2012. Opposition has come at all kinds of levels; some developers see lockdown as a way of taking control of systems away from their owners, while others see it as ultimately useless security theater. There does appear to be some value, though, in making a system as resistant to compromise as possible, so these patches have persisted and are often shipped by distributors. Disagreement over more recent versions of the lockdown patch set were focused on details like whether lockdown should be tied to the presence of secure boot or integration with the integrity-measurement infrastructure.

    One outcome from the most recent discussion was a concern that the lockdown patches were wiring too much policy into the kernel itself. The kernel has long had a mechanism for pushing security-policy decisions out to user space — the security-module mechanism. So it arguably makes sense to move lockdown decision-making into an LSM; that is indeed what the more recent versions of the patch set do.

    First, though, there is the problem of initialization. LSMs exist to apply policies to actions taken by user space, so as long as the LSM infrastructure is running by the time user space starts, everything is fine. Lockdown, though, must act earlier: it needs to be able to block the action of certain types of command-line parameters and must be functional even before a security policy can be loaded. So the patch set starts by creating a new type of "early security module" that is initialized toward the beginning of the boot process. At this point, the module can't do much — even basic amenities like kmalloc() are not available — but it's enough to register its hooks and take control.

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FreeBSD turns 26

tuxmachines.org - Čet, 07/04/2019 - 18:24

The FreeBSD operating system is continuing to make progress, 26 years after it got its name. Among the areas where work is being done is on improved support for RISC-V, FUSE filesystem updates, C runtime changes, and security improvements. FreeBSD Day is celebrated on June 19, in recognition of the date in 1993 when the name FreeBSD was coined for a fork of the 386BSD project. The first official release of FreeBSD did not occur until November 1, 1993, however.

Ahead of FreeBSD Day, the project released its quarterly report for the first quarter of 2019, outlining some of its ongoing efforts. In addition to the quarterly report, the executive director of the FreeBSD Foundation provided LWN with some insights into the state of the project and the foundation that supports it.

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Software Development Leftovers

tuxmachines.org - Čet, 07/04/2019 - 18:03
  • Faster snap development – additional tips and tricks

    Recently, we published several blog posts, aimed at helping developers enjoy a smoother, faster, more streamlined experience creating snaps. We discussed the tools and tricks you can employ in snapcraft to accelerate the speed at which you iterate on your builds.

    We want to continue the work presented in the Make your snap development faster tutorial, by giving you some fresh pointers and practical tips that will make the journey even brisker and snappier than before.

  • Further Exploring the Pandas.DataFrame Object method

    In this article, we will further look at the other methods of the DataFrame object, we will continue to explore the DataFrame object methods in a few more chapters before moving forward to the other Pandas objects.

  • Python for NLP: Creating Bag of Words Model from Scratch

    This is the 13th article in my series of articles on Python for NLP. In the previous article, we saw how to create a simple rule-based chatbot that uses cosine similarity between the TF-IDF vectors of the words in the corpus and the user input, to generate a response. The TF-IDF model was basically used to convert word to numbers.

    In this article, we will study another very useful model that converts text to numbers i.e. the Bag of Words (BOW).

    Since most of the statistical algorithms, e.g machine learning and deep learning techniques, work with numeric data, therefore we have to convert text into numbers. Several approaches exist in this regard. However, the most famous ones are Bag of Words, TF-IDF, and word2vec. Though several libraries exist, such as Scikit-Learn and NLTK, which can implement these techniques in one line of code, it is important to understand the working principle behind these word embedding techniques. The best way to do so is to implement these techniques from scratch in Python and this is what we are going to do today.

  • PHP version 7.2.20 and 7.3.7

    RPM of PHP version 7.3.7 are available in remi repository for Fedora 30 and in remi-php73 repository for Fedora 27-29 and Enterprise Linux ≥ 6 (RHEL, CentOS).

    RPM of PHP version 7.2.20 are available in remi repository for Fedora 28-29 and in remi-php72 repository for Fedora 26-27 and Enterprise Linux ≥ 6 (RHEL, CentOS).

  • Switching to Late Bird Tickets — please use your coupons today!
  • How continuous deployment impacts the entire organization

    CD brings fundamental changes to organizations because old scheduling and development cycles disappear. As you move to CD, you need to bring your entire organization—not just your development and operations teams—along in order to reap every advantage.

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AMD Graphics: AMDVLK, Navi/AMDGPU and RADV

tuxmachines.org - Čet, 07/04/2019 - 17:57
  • AMDVLK Support For Navi Might Be Slightly Delayed

    While there is the open-source OpenGL driver support in RadeonSI now part of Mesa 19.2 for the Radeon RX 5700 series launching on Sunday, for the open-source Vulkan driver support due to timing you might be needing to wait a little bit.

    For the popular RADV Vulkan driver within Mesa that is led by Valve/Google/RedHat developers, there aren't any indications AMD provided any card samples or documentation in advance to these "community" developers. We're hopeful though that we'll still see some Navi 10 support for RADV in Mesa 19.2 that is going into feature freeze in early August and then releasing as stable a few weeks after that point. For now it's a waiting game.

  • Navi 10 Code Lands In Mesa 19.2 For RadeonSI Ahead Of Radeon RX 5700 Series Launch

    Last week I wrote about Navi (10) support pending for the RadeonSI OpenGL driver to complement the AMDGPU Linux kernel driver support for the Radeon RX 5700 series currently queued into DRM-Next for Linux 5.3. That OpenGL driver support has been now been merged into Mesa 19.2 for debuting as stable around the end of August for providing open-source OpenGL on these next-gen AMD GPUs.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Switches To The RTLD Linker

    The work by Google developer Bas Nieuwenhuizen introduces the concept of RADV shader binaries that can allow for simplifying some elements of their code and creating RTLD shader binaries. Following the various changes, they switch to using the RTLD ELF linker.

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Plasma + Usability & Productivity Sprint in Valencia, Spain

KDE Dot - Čet, 07/04/2019 - 17:42

The KDE Plasma and Usability teams recently converged on the beautiful Spanish city of Valencia for a combined development sprint. The teams admired Valencia's medieval architecture and stayed up until midnight eating sumptuous Mediterranean food. But of course, the real purpose was work!

We camped out in the offices of the Slimbook company, which were generously made available for the sprint. The aim was not only to hack on Plasma and the Usability & Productivity initiative, but also to benefit from the cross-pollination opportunities provided by hosting both sprints at the same time and place.

The result was a huge amount of work done on Plasma, KWin, Dolphin, Spectacle, and many other bits of KDE software.

Present for the Plasma sprint were Kai Uwe Broulik, David Edmundson, Nicolas Fella, Eike Hein, Roman Gilg, Aleix Pol Gonzalez, Marco Martin, and Bhushan Shah. They had quite a busy agenda:

  • Plasma 5.16's new notification system received a great deal of polish
  • Fixed a ton of bugs in the Plasma Browser Integration
  • Rewrote the widget positioning code for the desktop, making it much more robust, future-proof, and usable on touch:



  • Started work on making the Task Manager understand window stacking order, which will allow it to implement new interaction modes for grouped windows (e.g. bring forward the last-used window when clicked)
  • Worked on architecture improvements for the Task Manager to unify its different presentation modes and improve code robustness
  • Worked on a variety of architecture improvements for KWin to make it more future-proof, which, among other things, will improve multi-screen handling
  • Improved the user interface for the System Tray's settings window
  • Added calculator and unit conversion functionality to Kickoff and Application Dashboard

Kickoff now integrates a calculator and a unit conversion utility.

In addition to making technical progress, the Plasma and Usability teams got together to discuss a number of long-standing Plasma issues, and figure out how to resolve them:

We wanted to make it easier to test a custom-compiled version of Plasma. To do so, we implemented changes that allow you to integrate your custom-compiled Plasma into SDDM by running a single command, after which you can log into it normally. For more information, see this article.

We thought it would be a good idea to make more it obvious and discoverable that Plasma is made up of widgets, and show how they are configured. To do this, we decided to create a new "global edit mode" that's triggerable from within System Settings, as this is where new users generally expect everything to be configured. In this global edit mode, all widgets become visibly configurable, editable, removable, etc. We also want to make it easy to change the wallpaper in this mode. With all that done, we'll be able to remove the Desktop Toolbox as it currently exists.

There was a need to unify the disparate scaling methods, so we decided to visually connect the scale factor chooser with the "Force Fonts DPI" setting, since the former actually affects the latter, but not the other way around. This should make it clear that the scaling slider is the primary way to scale the screen, and the "force fonts DPI" control is nothing more than a way to tweak things further.

We needed Plasma to respect the system-wide scale factor on X11, so we came up with a path forward and a plan for getting it done!

We planned out how to add power actions to the lock screen. We concluded that not only does this make sense, but it will be necessary for Plasma Mobile anyway. In a multi-user environment, the user will have to enter an admin password to shut down or restart the machine when other users are also logged in.

Even during down time, KDE carries on coding!

Over in the Usability & Productivity room we had Méven Car, Albert Astals Cid, Noah Davis, Filip Fila, Nate Graham, and David Redondo. The agenda was similarly jam-packed, and included the following:

  • We ported Spectacle to use KGlobalAccel and away from KHotKeys, made the quit-after-copy feature finally work, and added support for drawing annotations on newly-taken screenshots
  • We implemented user-configurable sort ordering for wallpaper slideshows
  • Dolphin received human-readable sort order text and an auto-play-on-hover feature for media files
  • We added inline name feedback when creating new files or folders
  • Users can optionally close windows in the Present Windows effect with a middle-click
  • Many user interface improvements have been made to the Purpose framework, which implements sharing support in many apps (Dolphin, Spectacle, Okular, Gwenview as of recently, and so on)
  • We started working on improving the default selection of pictures available for user account avatars
  • Initial work has been done on a new "Recently used" feature for Dolphin and the file dialogs that will pull its data from a single consistent location and actually notice everything

We also came to some significant conclusions related to higher-level goals. For example, we plan to pay for professional user research to generate new "personas" and target user groups that represent the people using our software. We will use these personas as the basis for professional usability testing for Plasma, Dolphin, Gwenview, Okular, and other components of a basic desktop.

Additionally, we discussed how we can add release notes data to our apps' AppStream data, so that it shows up in software center apps like Discover. The big blocker was getting the required translations added to the tarball. We've started a dialogue with AppStream maintainer Matthias Klumpp regarding a new feature to pull translations from a remote location, which would support our workflow. The conversation is proceeding nicely so far.

Finally, VDG member Noah Davis dug deep into Breeze to work on visual consistency improvements related to selection highlights. Given his growing familiarity with the code, he's well on his way to becoming the next Breeze maintainer!

All in all, it was a very productive week. KDE Plasma and apps are in a great place right now, and the team's effort to further improve things will reach you in upcoming versions, so stay tuned!

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The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.2.5

tuxmachines.org - Čet, 07/04/2019 - 17:26

The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.2.5, the fifth bug and regression fixing release of the LibreOffice 6.2 family, targeted at tech-savvy individuals: early adopters, technology enthusiasts and power users. Users in production environments can start evaluating LibreOffice 6.2.5.

LibreOffice’s individual users are helped by a global community of volunteers: https://www.libreoffice.org/get-help/community-support/. On the website and the wiki there are guides, manuals, tutorials and HowTos. Donations help us to make all of these resources available.

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CentOS 8.0 Completed Its Initial Build Loop

tuxmachines.org - Čet, 07/04/2019 - 17:05

It looks like CentOS 8 as the "community" version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0 is still a few weeks away, but good progress is being made.

In their July newsletter for CentOS, they still anticipate the release coming within "the next month or two."

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Announcing Rust 1.36.0

tuxmachines.org - Čet, 07/04/2019 - 16:57

The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.36.0. Rust is a programming language that is empowering everyone to build reliable and efficient software.

Also: Rust 1.36 Brings Offline Support In Cargo, Stable Alloc Crate

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OpenHMD 0.3.0-rc2 Released For This Open-Source API/Drivers For VR/AR Hardware

Phoronix - Čet, 07/04/2019 - 16:57
Issued today was the second release candidate for OpenHMD 0.3.0, the open-source project providing a common API and different drivers for VR/AR hardware...

Security: SKS, YouTube, Malware and More

tuxmachines.org - Čet, 07/04/2019 - 16:42
  • Impact of SKS keyserver poisoning on Gentoo

    The SKS keyserver network has been a victim of certificate poisoning attack lately. The OpenPGP verification used for repository syncing is protected against the attack. However, our users can be affected when using GnuPG directly. In this post, we would like to shortly summarize what the attack is, what we did to protect Gentoo against it and what can you do to protect your system.

    The certificate poisoning attack abuses three facts: that OpenPGP keys can contain unlimited number of signatures, that anyone can append signatures to any key and that there is no way to distinguish a legitimate signature from garbage. The attackers are appending a large number of garbage signatures to keys stored on SKS keyservers, causing them to become very large and cause severe performance issues in GnuPG clients that fetch them.

    The attackers have poisoned the keys of a few high ranking OpenPGP people on the SKS keyservers, including one Gentoo developer. Furthermore, the current expectation is that the problem won’t be fixed any time soon, so it seems plausible that more keys may be affected in the future. We recommend users not to fetch or refresh keys from SKS keyserver network (this includes aliases such as keys.gnupg.net) for the time being. GnuPG upstream is already working on client-side countermeasures and they can be expected to enter Gentoo as soon as they are released.

  • YouTube's latest ban? Infosec instructional videos are outlawed

    Google's video-sharing site YouTube has started to ban videos that show users how to get past software restrictions and provide instructions on information security.

  • Youtube's ban on "hacking techniques" threatens to shut down all of infosec Youtube

    Youtube banning security disclosures doesn't make products more secure, nor will it prevent attackers from exploiting defects -- but it will mean that users will be the last to know that they've been trusting the wrong companies, and that developers will keep on making the same stupid mistakes...forever.

  • TN men use Bluetooth-enabled tablet to steal cars

    During the interrogation, one of the accused –a car mechanic- said he bought a Bluetooth-enabled tablet online used by car showroom staff to access the vehicles.

  • Kaspersky reinforce collaboration with INTERPOL in the fight against cybercrime

    This cooperation strengthens the existing relationship between the two organizations, ensuring information and technology sharing can support INTERPOL in cybercrime-related investigations. Within the new agreement, Kaspersky will share information about its cyberthreat research and provide the necessary tools to assist with full digital forensics, aimed at strengthening efforts on the prevention of cyberattacks.

  • China Is Forcing Tourists to Install Text-Stealing Malware at its Border

    The malware downloads a tourist’s text messages, calendar entries, and phone logs, as well as scans the device for over 70,000 different files.

  • Chinese border guards reportedly install spy apps on tourists' Android phones

    Border guards reportedly took tourists' phones and secretly installed an app on them which could extract emails, texts and contacts, along with information about the handset; basically a mother-load of privacy-sapping stuff.

    There are reports that in some cases Android phones are returned to those entering the region with an app called Fēng cǎi installed. Apple's iPhones don't appear to come back with the app, but they could have been scanned by border control guards in a separate area after travellers were forced to hand them over.

  • China Snares Tourists’ Phones in Surveillance Dragnet by Adding Secret App

    The app gathers personal data from phones, including text messages and contacts. It also checks whether devices are carrying pictures, videos, documents and audio files that match any of more than 73,000 items included on a list stored within the app’s code.

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Games: Avorion, Synergia, Superstarfighter, Kubifaktorium, Viking Vengeance, We Need To Go Deeper

tuxmachines.org - Čet, 07/04/2019 - 16:33
  • The awesome co-op space sandbox game "Avorion" now has modding support

    Avorion is a fully 3D co-op space sandbox game, where players build a ship and eventually a fleet from single blocks and it's quite engrossing. This latest update enables proper modding support, with integrated Steam Workshop support.

    Previously, you were able to download pre-built ships other had made but this goes a massive step further for the game. You can now use Lua to mod all sorts of things in the game, although some things like Materials, Rarities or Blocks cannot yet be modded. What's fun is that dedicated servers, for those that plan online, also support modding. If you connect to a modded server, it grabs the mods for you—handy.

  • Synergia, a cyberpunk thriller visual novel will support Linux and it has a demo - it's quite impressive

    Ready to get engrossed in another Visual Novel? Synergia looks promising, with a futuristic yuri cyberpunk setting. Giving off some Ghost in the Shell vibes, it's actually quite impressive. The intro video especially, not something I was expecting to see with a Visual Novel and sets the mood quite nicely.

  • Superstarfighter, a free and open source local multiplayer party game

    I recently got shown Superstarfighter, a 1-4 player local multiplayer (with AI too) fast-paced action game and it's actually pretty fun.

    It's a very frantic arcade game, where each player can shoot out homing missiles to take down other players. With multiple game modes available, it's surprisingly good. I'm quite a fan of the Take the Crown mode, where each player fights over a single Crown and whoever wears in the longest wins. There's also a pretty amusing Hive Filling mode, with each player flying over tiles to change the tile into their colour, with opposing colours slowing you down.

  • Kubifaktorium, a voxel colony management and automation game developed on Linux is now in Early Access

    The second game developed by Mirko Seithe and made on Linux, Kubifaktorium, a voxel colony management and automation game is now available in Early Access.

  • Inspired by norse mythology, the action RPG "Viking Vengeance" looks like a lot of fun

    As someone who has been slightly obsessed over the Vikings series from the History network, a game based around Norse mythology is exactly what I need right now.

    Viking Vengeance from Lowpoly Interactive is due out sometime later this year and it is currently advertising Linux support on Steam. When speaking to the developer about it in this forum post, they said "Hello and thank you for the question. Yes if people using Linux will be interested in the game we will definitely bring it to Linux.", so it might be worth letting them know if you're interested.

  • Co-op submarine adventure game "We Need To Go Deeper" is releasing on August 1st

    In the official announcement, they said the price is going to be increasing from $9.99 to $15.99 so if you were thinking of getting it you may want to think quicker if you wanted to save a little. After release, they said updates will still be coming, just not as often as they do currently. A special edition will also be offered which will include a PDF art book and an expanded soundtrack. They're also considering paid DLC as it "gets asked a lot".

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[$] Soft CPU affinity

LWN.net - Čet, 07/04/2019 - 16:03
On NUMA systems with a lot of CPUs, it is common to assign parts of the workload to different subsets of the available processors. This partitioning can improve performance while reducing the ability of jobs to interfere with each other. The partitioning mechanisms available on current kernels might just do too good a job in some situations, though, leaving some CPUs idle while others are overutilized. The soft affinity patch set from Subhra Mazumdar is an attempt to improve performance by making that partitioning more porous.

Rust 1.36 Brings Offline Support In Cargo, Stable Alloc Crate

Phoronix - Čet, 07/04/2019 - 15:17
The Rust language team is marking this US Independence Day by rolling out Rust 1.36...
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