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Security updates for Monday

LWN.net - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 15:43
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (chromium and thunderbird), Debian (php-horde-form, pyxdg, thunderbird, and znc), Fedora (containernetworking-plugins, mediawiki, and podman), openSUSE (chromium), Red Hat (bind, chromium-browser, and flash-plugin), SUSE (docker, glibc, gstreamer-0_10-plugins-base, gstreamer-plugins-base, postgresql10, sqlite3, and thunderbird), and Ubuntu (firefox).

Filesystem Hierarchy Standard

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 15:10

If you are new to the Linux command line, you may find yourself wondering why there are so many unusual directories, what they are there for, and why things are organized the way they are. In fact, if you aren't accustomed to how Linux organizes files, the directories can seem downright arbitrary with odd truncated names and, in many cases, redundant names. It turns out there's a method to this madness based on decades of UNIX convention, and in this article, I provide an introduction to the Linux directory structure.

Although each Linux distribution has its own quirks, the majority conform (for the most part) with the Filesystem Hierarchy Standard (FHS). The FHS project began in 1993, and the goal was to come to a consensus on how directories should be organized and which files should be stored where, so that distributions could have a single reference point from which to work. A lot of decisions about directory structure were based on traditional UNIX directory structures with a focus on servers and with an assumption that disk space was at a premium, so machines likely would have multiple hard drives.

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Games: Terminal, Donensbourgh, Voxel Tycoon, SteamWorld Quest: Hand of Gilgamech, Truck the System, RPCS3 and Thrive

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 14:41
  • 5 command-line games for sysadmins

    Just because you prefer working in a text-mode interface doesn't mean you're not entitled to a little fun here and there.

    Last December, I took some time out before the holidays to explore some of my favorite command-line diversions into a series for Opensource.com. It ended up being a bit of an advent calendar for terminal toys, and I got some great suggestions from readers.

    Now summer has arrived, at least for us in the northern hemisphere, and for many of this means a time of summer breaks, vacations, and generally trying to fit in a little relaxation between committing code and closing tickets. So to that end, I thought I'd revisit five of my favorite command-line games from that series, and share them here with you on Enable Sysadmin.

  • Donensbourgh, a medieval farming RPG that could be one to watch has Linux support

    Currently in the early stages but it seems promising, Donensbourgh is a medieval RPG with no violence or combat of any kind for those after perhaps a more relaxing experience. I'm glad developers take risks and make games like this, as I do enjoy games with plenty of combat but I often find there's not enough outside of that.

    Sadly, it seems they don't do their development videos showcasing gameplay in English so I've not a clue what they're saying.

  • An early build of the tycoon strategy game 'Voxel Tycoon' will release on itch.io later this month

    Voxel Tycoon, another in-development indie game that will have Linux support is arriving soon with an early build.

    What exactly is it? The developer says it's a "tycoon strategy game about transportation, building factories, and mining in a beautiful voxel landscapes" which sounds interesting. Even more interesting perhaps, is their claim that it will include "all-new features never before seen in the genre". I'm keen to see if it will live up to that in any way, so I will be taking a look when it's ready.

  • SteamWorld Quest: Hand of Gilgamech can now be picked up DRM-free on GOG

    SteamWorld Quest: Hand of Gilgamech, the fun card-based tactical RPG from Image and Form (developer) and Thunderful (publisher) can now be picked up DRM-free on GOG.

  • Truck the System, an upcoming game about building trucks and then racing them sounds amusing

    Currently in development by UK developer jorgen games (hooray, a fellow Brit!), Truck the System is a slightly unusual racing game that's coming to Linux.

    It's not a standard racing game like Dirt or Grid as you will be actually building your vehicle, possibly adding a bunch of weapons and then race or fight your way to the finish. Sounds like it could be a lot of fun! There's no full trailer yet since it's still in development but here's a few quick clips to give you an idea:

  • PlayStation 3 emulator RPCS3 has a new report out, over 40% of listed games now "Playable"

    RPCS3, the very impressive PlayStation 3 emulator continues advancing quickly with the team putting up a new report. This latest report covers April, with the delay being due to not having enough contributors. They're actually looking for help writing them, which you can apply for here.

  • Thrive, a free and open source game about the evolution of life

    Thrive [Official Site] is a game I came across years ago, a game about the evolution of life with you starting as a tiny Microbe and eventually working up to something more complex.

    That idea might sound familiar and for good reason, as it was originally inspired by the game Spore. However, they're attempting to go a little further by being scientifically accurate and have the evolution play-out across both you and everything around you.

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Hack Computer review

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 14:37

I bought a hack computer for $299 - it's designed for teaching 8+ year olds programming. That's not my intended use case, but I wanted to support a Linux pre-installed vendor with my purchase (I bought an OLPC back in the day in the buy-one give-one program).

I only use a laptop for company events, which are usually 2-4 weeks a year. Otherwise, I use my desktop. I would have bought a machine with Ubuntu pre-installed if I was looking for more of a daily driver.

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Linux 5.3 Could Finally See FSGSBASE - Performance Improvements Back To Ivybridge

Phoronix - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 13:18
The FSGSBASE instruction set has been present on Intel processors going back to Ivy Bridge processors and while there have been Linux kernel patches for this feature going on for years, it looks like with the Linux 5.3 kernel cycle is this support for merging. Making us eager for this support is the prospect of better performance, especially for context switching workloads that already have been suffering as a result of recent CPU mitigations...

The State Of RISC-V For Debian 10 "Buster"

Phoronix - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 12:44
Debian's RISC-V support has been coming together but how's the state of affairs for the imminent Debian 10.0 "Buster" release?..

Developers Devising Plan To Ship Newer NVIDIA Drivers On Ubuntu Stable Releases

Phoronix - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 12:20
Currently NVIDIA's packaged drivers on Ubuntu can get a bit stale on Ubuntu stable releases since they aren't updated in-step with the latest driver releases. But a new stable release update (SRU) policy/exception similar to the Firefox approach is being made for Ubuntu so that new releases will end up working their way into currently supported Ubuntu series...

KIT Scenarist is a Powerful Tool for Creating Screenplays

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 12:14

KIT Scenarist is an open source software for creating screenplays. You can use it for creating stories from the birth of the idea and before the transfer of the script to production.

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Arm Developer Provides More Glibc Optimizations - Memem & Strstr

Phoronix - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 12:11
Arm's Wilco Dijkstra landed some more optimizations this past week in the Glibc development code for the upcoming GNU C Library 2.30 release...

NetworkManager Now Supports Making OVS DPDK Interfaces, Other Work For 1.20

Phoronix - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 11:54
NetworkManager 1.19.4 is the newest snapshot of this widely used Linux networking library on its road to version 1.20...

R.T. Russell's Z80 BBC Basic is now open source

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 05:29

As part of the work I’ve been doing with cpmish I’ve been trying to track down the copyright holders of some of the more classic pieces of CP/M software and asking them to license it in a way that allows redistribution. One of the people I contacted was R.T. Russell, the author of the classic Z80 BBC BASIC, and he very kindly sent me the source and agreed to allow it to be distributed under the terms of the zlib license. So it’s now open source!

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Games: Strange Loop Games and City Builder

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 03:49

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Debian GNU/Linux riscv64 port in mid 2019

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 03:37

As it can be seen in the first graph, perhaps with some difficulty, is that the percent of arch-dependent packages built for riscv64 (grey line) has been around or higher than 80% since mid 2018, just a few months after the port was added to the infrastructure.

Given than the arch-dependent packages are about half of the Debian['s main, unstable] archive and that (in simple terms) arch-independent packages can be used by all ports (provided that the software that they rely on is present, e.g. a programming language interpreter), this means that around 90% of packages of the whole archive has been available for this architecture from early on.

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Latest Security FUD

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 03:17

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Software: Synapse, Qmmp and LibreOffice

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 03:16
  • How to install and use Synapse, the MacOS Spotlight alternative for Linux

    Mac OS is everybody’s favorite, and there are several reasons behind it. One of the most useful utilities you can find on Mac OS is Spotlight, which makes searching for things a piece of cake, all directly from the desktop. While most developers have already designed similar utilities for Windows, the open-source Linux based operating systems are no exception, as well. Most Linux operating systems like Ubuntu have its own search functionality, but it can sometimes be troublesome to reach there and isn’t as powerful as Spotlight. So with Synapse for Linux, you can do just that, and boost the power of the search functionality on your system.

    With Synapse for Ubuntu, you can even search for things on the web, which is cool, as well. Some Linux distros like Lubuntu, don’t offer decent search functionality, and Synapse can be a great solution in such cases. With Synapse, searching is easy with just the navigation buttons on your keyboard, and you are ready to go. Synapse can be downloaded and installed from the Linux official repository. Synapse can also be configured to run on startup so that too don’t need to search for, and open Synapse, each time you need to use it.

  • Qmmp 1.3.3 Released with Floating PulseAudio, ALSA, OSS4 Support

    Qmmp, Qt based audio player, released version 1.3.3 with improvements and bug fixes. Here’s how to install it in Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu 18.10, Ubuntu 19.04.

  • Office Suites for Ubuntu 18.04

    Today we are looking at different office suites for Ubuntu 18.04. LibreOffice is the default LibreOffice suite for Ubuntu but it is by all means not the only one. In this article, we will look at different office suites for Ubuntu and all of its pros and cons.

    All these Office Suites are available for at least all Ubuntu based distros, and the installation method is the same for all the Ubuntu based distros.

  • Week 3 Report

    I continue working on Rewriting the logger messages with the new DSL grammar:

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Lenovo ThinkPad P Laptops Are Available with Ubuntu

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 03:13

Dell may be the best-known Linux laptop vendor right now, but Lenovo is looking to muscle in on the pre-installed Linux machine market.

All of Lenovo’s refreshed ThinkPad P series laptops will be available to buy with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS preinstalled when they go on sale in the US later this month.

Oddly, Lenovo doesn’t mention Linux availability in their press release introducing the new ThinkPad P series laptops, but eagle-eyed Linux users spotted the additional OS option on when investigating the laptop’s ‘tech specs’ on the Lenovo website.

The company says its refreshed P-series ‘portfolio’ is “…is designed to meet the ever-changing power and portability needs of modern professionals across industries – both in the office and beyond without sacrificing our legendary engineering know-how, reliability and security.”

Also: How to install Lubuntu Linux OS on PC via USB stick/drive

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Move to pay Debian devs for project work rears its head again

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 03:09

The idea of paying developers to work on Debian GNU/Linux packages has reared its head again, with senior developer Raphael Hertzog proposing that project funds be used for the purpose.

Hertzog made the suggestion in a reply to a post on one of the project's mailing lists which was part of a thread on the subject "Why do we take so long to realise good ideas?"

"Use the $300,000 on our bank accounts?", he wrote, adding that he had heard of another US$300,000 donation made by Google to the project though he was unable to find any publicly accessible reference to it.

The idea of paying developers for their work on what is a community project was raised 13 years ago by former project leader Anthony Towns, with the reason being the speeding up of development so that releases could take place sooner. The idea did not prove very popular as it was meant to be run outside the project proper and was meant to pay core members for their work.

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