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Patch into The Matrix at the Linux command line

tuxmachines.org - Sre, 12/12/2018 - 18:10

You've found your way to today's entry from the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be wondering what a command-line toy even is? It's anything that's an entertaining diversion at the terminal, be it a game, a fun utility, or a simple distraction.

Some of these are classics, and some are completely new (at least to me), but I hope all of you find something you enjoy in this series.

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5 resolutions for open source project maintainers

tuxmachines.org - Sre, 12/12/2018 - 18:07

I'm generally not big on New Year's resolutions. I have no problem with self-improvement, of course, but I tend to anchor around other parts of the calendar. Even so, there's something about taking down this year's free calendar and replacing it with next year's that inspires some introspection.

In 2017, I resolved to not share articles on social media until I'd read them. I've kept to that pretty well, and I'd like to think it has made me a better citizen of the internet. For 2019, I'm thinking about resolutions to make me a better open source software maintainer.

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Dell’s 2018 XPS 13 DE—The best “out of the box” Linux laptop gets the best OS

tuxmachines.org - Sre, 12/12/2018 - 18:00

It has been six years since Dell first introduced its XPS Developer Edition moniker, which refers specifically to the company's XPS laptop models that ship with Ubuntu Linux (and not Windows) pre-installed. Ever since, Dell has been producing some of the best Linux "ultrabooks" in recent memory.

Ars has already put the Windows-boasting XPS 13 through its paces earlier this year since the device received a serious overhaul in 2018. Dell bumped up the hardware specs, revamped the thermal system, and introduced a new rose and white version, for instance. But how is latest edition of the premier "just works" Linux laptop doing with the added muscle?

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[$] DMA and get_user_pages()

LWN.net - Sre, 12/12/2018 - 17:55

In the RDMA microconference of the 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC), John Hubbard, Dan Williams, and Matthew Wilcox led a discussion on the problems surrounding get_user_pages() (and friends) and the interaction with DMA. It is not the first time the topic has come up, there was also a discussion about it at the Linux Storage, Filesystem, and Memory-Management Summit back in April. In a nutshell, the problem is that multiple parts of the kernel think they have responsibility for the same chunk of memory, but they do not coordinate their activities; as might be guessed, mayhem can sometimes ensue.

The x32 subarchitecture may be removed

LWN.net - Sre, 12/12/2018 - 17:52
The x32 subarchitecture is a software variant of x86-64; it runs the processor in the 64-bit mode, but uses 32-bit pointers and arithmetic. The idea is to get the advantages of x86-64 without the extra memory usage that goes along with it. It seems, though, that x32 is not much appreciated; few distributions support it and the number of users appears to be small. So now Andy Lutomirski is proposing its eventual removal:

I propose that we make CONFIG_X86_X32 depend on BROKEN for a release or two and then remove all the code if no one complains. If anyone wants to re-add it, IMO they're welcome to do so, but they need to do it in a way that is maintainable.

If there are x32 users out there, now would be a good time for them to speak up.

AMDVLK 2018.Q4.4 Driver Update Brings Performance Improvements, New Vulkan Bits

Phoronix - Sre, 12/12/2018 - 17:42
AMD developers today outed their latest "AMDVLK" open-source Vulkan driver code drop dubbed AMDVLK 2018.Q4.4...

NVIDIA 415.23 Driver Fixes Build Issues Against Linux 4.20 Kernel

Phoronix - Sre, 12/12/2018 - 16:48
It was just last week NVIDIA released the 415.22 driver while out today is the 415.23 update...

Security updates for Wednesday

LWN.net - Sre, 12/12/2018 - 16:46
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (chromium, firefox, lib32-openssl, lib32-openssl-1.0, openssl, openssl-1.0, texlive-bin, and wireshark-cli), Fedora (perl), openSUSE (pdns), Oracle (kernel), Red Hat (kernel), Slackware (mozilla), SUSE (kernel, postgresql10, qemu, and xen), and Ubuntu (firefox, freerdp, freerdp2, pixman, and poppler).

Intel Working On Open-Sourcing The FSP - Would Be Huge Win For Coreboot & Security

Phoronix - Sre, 12/12/2018 - 15:00
Intel's Architecture Day on Tuesday was delightfully filled with an overwhelming amount of valuable hardware information, but Intel's software efforts were also briefly touched on too. In fact, Raja Koduri reinforced how software is a big part of Intel technology and goes in-hand with their security, interconnect, memory, architecture, and process pillars and that's where their new oneAPI initiative will fit in. But what learning afterwards was most exciting on the software front...

Intel Developing "oneAPI" For Optimized Code Across CPUs, GPUs, FPGAs & More

Phoronix - Sre, 12/12/2018 - 15:00
Intel's 2018 Architecture Day was primarily focused on the company's hardware architecture road-map, but one of the software (pre)announcements was their oneAPI software stack...

Intel Details Gen11 Graphics & Sunny Cove For Icelake

Phoronix - Sre, 12/12/2018 - 15:00
At Intel's architecture day, the company finally detailed their "Gen 11" graphics that we've been seeing open-source Linux graphics driver patches for many months (Intel OTC posted their initial open-source display driver code in early January and has continued the enablement work since) albeit elusive in substantive user details and hardware until Icelake. But today at least we can share more about the significant improvements with Gen11 graphics...

Everything You Need to Know About Using PPA in Ubuntu

tuxmachines.org - Sre, 12/12/2018 - 14:38

An in-depth article that covers almost all the questions around using PPA in Ubuntu and other Linux distributions.

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Server: IBM, Oracle, Google, Red Hat and More From Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) Event

tuxmachines.org - Sre, 12/12/2018 - 11:43
  • Open Source Is the Future, So Where Does IBM i Fit In?

    The IBM i server reached a milestone this year when it turned 30 years old, an amazing feat for a remarkable system that continues to provide computational value to tens of thousands of organizations around the world. But another birthday was celebrated this year that the IBM i community should take note of: The 20th anniversary of the beginning of the open source movement.

    Now, this birthday is a little bit questionable because open source software existed before 1998, of course. But the time is worth marking because an important meeting took place in Palo Alto, California, where the phrase “open source” was deliberately created by a group of industry leaders.

    That meeting, which was spurred by the release of the source code to the Netscape Web browser, would set into motion a movement that would change the entire IT industry. The concept of freely sharing the guts of software, rather than treating it as private property, started slowly, but it would eventually build into an insurmountable force.

    [...]

    There’s no reason why both approaches can’t co-exist. IBM can bring machine learning tools like Scikit-Learn and Numpy to the platform via PASE, while others in the IBM i community can develop native open source software, including an ERP package. There will be tradeoffs in performance and usability, of course, but having choices is part of the joy of having a healthy, robust community – and there’s even a place for proprietary software too.

    In the end, the momentum behind the open source software movement is just too great to ignore. Where IBM i sits in 2028, when it celebrates its 40th birthday, will largely depend on how welcoming IBM and the IBM i community are to open source software and modern software development methodologies. The future literally depends on it.

  • Oracle shows up at KubeCon bearing ‘comprehensive cloud native framework’

    Oracle crashed the party at KubeCon today, promising to free developers from vendor lock-in with what it claims is the “most comprehensive cloud native framework”.

    The veteran enterprise software vendor said its Oracle Cloud Native Framework “arms” developers with “a cloud native solution that spans public cloud, on premises and hybrid cloud deployments.”

  • Everything that was announced at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon

    KubeCon + CloudNativeCon 2018 is being held this week in Seattle, and naturally a long list of companies and organizations are using the event to update the public on their projects related Kubernetes and Cloud Native Computing.

    The event is hosted by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, under the auspices of the Linux Foundation. The foundation oversees Kubernetes and other open source projects related to microservices.

  • Google's rent-a-cloud biz revs Istio for its Kubernetes service

    As a gathering of DevOps types at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America 2018 gets under way in Seattle, Washington, Google plans to tell anyone who will listen that its managed Kubernetes service, GKE, now can be ordered with Istio on the side, though you'll have to ladle it on yourself.

    Here's how the Chocolate Factory described the open source software:

    "Istio is a service mesh that lets you manage and visualize your applications as services, rather than individual infrastructure components," said Chen Goldberg, director of engineering at Google Cloud and Jennifer Lin, director of Google Cloud management, in a blog post provided in advance to The Register.

  • Exploring Kubernetes’ impact in hybrid cloud at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America 2018

    In a computing market constantly chasing more agile methods of deploying data, portable container technologies have become the lynchpin in enterprise multicloud strategy with the Kubernetes container orchestration at the helm. Boasting historic growth and popularity among leading cloud vendors, the relatively young technology is proving fundamental within a market transforming as a result of the freedom and experimentation it has enabled.

    As a shift in favor of hybrid cloud computing prompts cloud leaders to prioritize Kubernetes and, more directly, leverage its capabilities, how will its standardization and widening adoption transform the open-source tool? Moreso, how will Kubernetes continue to transform the market at large?

    Looking to answer these and other questions, SiliconANGLE is at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America 2018, currently underway in Seattle, Washington, with exclusive commentary and interviews from our roving news desk, theCUBE. TheCUBE coverage will begin at 10:30 a.m. PST Tuesday, Dec. 11, and end at 3:30 pm. Thursday, Dec. 13.

  • CNCF Takes Control of Open Source etcd Data Store Project

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), which oversees the development of Kubernetes, announced today that the open source etcd distributed key value store has now been accepted as a complementary incubation project. The announcement was made at the KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America 2018 conference today.

    etcd was developed by CoreOS to provide a reliable way to store data across a cluster of machines. CoreOS was subsequently acquired by Red Hat. At its base level, etcd is written in Go and relies on the Raft consensus algorithm to manage a highly available replicated log to manage everything from recovering from hardware failures to portioning networks.

  • Red Hat donates a key open-source Kubernetes tool to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation
  • The Cloud Native Computing Foundation adds etcd to its open-source stable

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), the open-source home of projects like Kubernetes and Vitess, today announced that its technical committee has voted to bring a new project on board. That project is etcd, the distributed key-value store that was first developed by CoreOS (now owned by Red Hat, which in turn will soon be owned by IBM). Red Hat has now contributed this project to the CNCF.

    Etcd, which is written in Go, is already a major component of many Kubernetes deployments, where it functions as a source of truth for coordinating clusters and managing the state of the system. Other open-source projects that use etcd include Cloud Foundry, and companies that use it in production include Alibaba, ING, Pinterest, Uber, The New York Times and Nordstrom.

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Git 2.20.0 released

LWN.net - Sre, 12/12/2018 - 09:49
Git 2.20.0 is out. Changes include interdiff generation support in git format-patch, an improved ability to cope with corrupted patches in git am, a number of performance and usability improvements, and more.

Btrfs Restoring Support For Swap Files With Linux 4.21

Phoronix - Sre, 12/12/2018 - 09:27
The Btrfs file-system hasn't supported Swap files on it in early a decade, but that support will be restored again with the upcoming Linux 4.21 kernel...

Mesa 18.3.1 Released To Disable Botched Vulkan Extension

Phoronix - Sre, 12/12/2018 - 06:11
Mesa 18.3 was released less than a week ago while today Mesa 18.3.1 was issued due to an error in the Vulkan specification...

Intel's IWD Linux Wireless Daemon 0.13 Adds Opportunistic Wireless Encryption

Phoronix - Sre, 12/12/2018 - 06:03
Intel's promising IWD open-source wireless daemon continues picking up additional functionality in its trek towards potentially replacing wpa_supplicant. Out this week is IWD 0.13...
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