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A quick guide to switching from Windows to Linux

tuxmachines.org - Sob, 08/11/2018 - 01:36

Windows is hands down the most popular Operating System in the world. Being the most popular however doesn’t necessarily mean it is the best. Windows can be so nagging sometimes, especially with updates. Don’t get me started on the whole malware issue. It is the most targetted Operating System and that makes sense due to its shear scale of numbers. Also, not many people are fans of the one-size-fits-all that Windows is using on its consumer-grade system.

That said, if you are unhappy with your Windows experience, you could invest in a Mac or sell a kidney and get yourself their usually overpriced hardware to run their Operating System MacOS. But since you already have decent hardware with you, the world of Linux could very well be your next destination.

Also: How to Install Linux Mint 19 Tara? | The Complete Installation Guide

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[$] The mismatched mount mess

LWN.net - Sob, 08/11/2018 - 00:26
"Mounting" a filesystem is the act of making it available somewhere in the system's directory hierarchy. But a mount operation doesn't just glue a device full of files into a specific spot in the tree; there is a whole set of parameters controlling how that filesystem is accessed that can be specified at mount time. The handling of these mount parameters is the latest obstacle to getting the proposed new mounting API into the mainline; should the new API reproduce what is arguably one of the biggest misfeatures of the current mount() system call?

Intel IWD Wireless Daemon v0.6 Released

Phoronix - Pet, 08/10/2018 - 23:37
Out today is a new version of IWD, the Intel-developed wireless daemon for Linux systems. IWD v0.6 is the latest version which is actually a quick follow-up release to address bugs from IWD v0.5 issued this morning...

Linux EDAC Support For AMD's Great Horned Owl

Phoronix - Pet, 08/10/2018 - 23:10
The latest Linux kernel patch is for supporting ECC error detection via the Error Detection And Correction (EDAC) code with AMD's Great Horned Owl...

Rust's Low-Level Graphics Abstraction Layer Is Showing A Lot Of Potential

Phoronix - Pet, 08/10/2018 - 19:49
The Rust programming language's "GFX-RS" initiative that is backed by Mozilla continues working on exposing a universal "Vulkan-like" graphics API within Rust that in turn would have back-ends for Vulkan, OpenGL, Metal, and Direct3D 11/12 in order to reach all major platforms. Early benchmark results are quite promising for GFX-RS...

OSS Leftovers

tuxmachines.org - Pet, 08/10/2018 - 19:35
  • Open source Kaa IoT middleware to take on enterprise IoT

    To benefit from IoT, businesses need a way to network, manage and secure all of their connected devices. While there are proprietary IoT middleware platforms available to do this for the home and heavy industries like manufacturing, the Kaa IoT platform is one of the few open source options on the market today that is business-ready.

  • bzip.org changes hands

    The bzip2 compression algorithm has been slowly falling out of favor, but is still used heavily across the net. A search for "bzip2 source" returns bzip.org as the first three results. But it would seem that the owner of this domain has let it go, and it is now parked and running ads. So we no longer have an official home for bzip2.

  • Three Capabilities Banks Need to Work On While Adopting Open Source

    As banks are now willing to experiment and adopt new age technologies such as artificial intelligence and blockchain, the next big step of its digital disruption has to do with open source banking.

    With the adoption of open source, banks are likely to open their APIs and share customer data with third-party players to develop innovative products and offer customized real-time bespoke services to customers.

    Industry experts consider it to be the best time to embrace open banking as customer buying patterns are changing.

    In a previous interaction with Entrepreneur India, Rajeev Ahuja, Executive Director, RBL Bank accredited this change to “the emergence of nontraditional competition such as fintech startups, growing domination of technologies like blockchain, artificial intelligences, machine learning, etc and lastly, the initiatives taken by the Reserve Bank Of India to regulated the payments banks, peer to peer lending platforms, linking of Aadhar, and e-kyc.”

  • Free and open-source software con returns to International House

    FOSSCon, a free and open-source software conference, will be held Aug. 25 at the International House Philadelphia. Lectures and workshops will teach participants about free software and new ways to use it.

    Unlike most software, which is only available under restrictive licensing, free and open-source software is available under licenses that let people distribute, run and modify the software for their own purposes. It includes well-known projects like the Firefox browser or the Linux kernel. Those who talk about “free software” emphasize the way copyright law restricts users’ freedom, while those who talk about “open source” emphasize the economic and technical benefits of shared development.

    However, most of the scheduled events are far from philosophical, focusing on technical subjects like the use of domain name systems or the filesystem ZFS. The speakers range from professional programmers to enthusiasts. Most famous on the list is Eric S. Raymond, one of the thinkers behind “open source,” who will speak about the history of the C programming language and what might replace it. Of particular local interest is a talk by Eric O’Callaghan, a systems administrator at Thomas Jefferson University, on how to use public data from Indego Bike Share.

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Devices: Tizen, OpenZWave, and Ibase

tuxmachines.org - Pet, 08/10/2018 - 19:28
  • Samsung Galaxy Watch, Running Tizen, is Launched

    Today, as expected, Samsung have launched a new smartwatch, the Samsung Galaxy Watch, yes, the name change is real (previously it has been known as the Gear S4). At the Samsung Unpacked event, we were given the Note 9 and the Galaxy Watch. The big headline for us is the watch will not be running Wear OS, as speculated once upon a time, but the Galaxy Watch will be running Tizen 4.0.

    We will have two models to choose from: 46mm available in silver and a 42mm black and rose gold versions. Samsung have realised that “one size does not fit all” and some might find a smaller watch face appealing.

  • Building a better thermostat with Home Assistant

    Next, I needed to look at software to use my hardware acquisitions as a thermostat. While all my devices were Z-Wave, and OpenZWave provides both C++ and Python interfaces I could use to access and control my devices, it was a bit too low-level for my taste.

    Instead, I decided to use the Home Assistant project, for a few reasons. First, I know a bunch of people who use it, hack on it, or both. Second, while all my current devices are Z-Wave, Home Assistant will let me branch out to use other kinds of devices if I want. Home Assistant supports a ton of different devices and services—you can look at the component list to see them all. For Z-Wave support, it leverages OpenZWave and provides a higher level interface that is a bit easier to deal with. Home Assistant is written in Python 3, which is very convenient for me since I do most of my programming in Python. It also has an active community that has been responsive and helpful.

    I installed Home Assistant on one of my servers and proceeded to configure its interface with my devices. There is a lot of detailed information available on setting up Home Assistant—you can refer to the official documentation for a starting point. For specific Z-Wave instructions, see the Z-Wave section in the Home Assistant docs.

    After setting up Home Assistant, I had a single web interface and API for controlling my new power switches and displaying data from the MultiSensor. But, I still didn't have a thermostat—just a pretty interface (that I could use remotely) for manually turning the AC on or off.

  • IP65 protected panel PCs feature Apollo Lake or Core-U chips

    Ibase announced three open-frame panel PCs with Linux support. The 15-inch, 1024 x 768 OFP-151-PC and 21-inch, 1920 x 1080 OFP-2100-PC run on the Pentium N4200 while the 21-inch OFP-2101-PC offers a choice of 7th Gen Core-U CPUs.

    Ibase, which last year launched an SE-102-N signage player, has now returned with a pair of fanless, open-frame touch-panel PCs that similarly run Linux 4.x or Windows 10 on an Intel Apollo Lake SoC. The 15-inch, 1024 x 768 OFP-151-PC and 21-inch, 1920 x 1080 OFP-2100-PC ship with a quad-core, 1.1/2.5GHz Pentium N4200 with 6W TDP.

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Mozilla Development and News

tuxmachines.org - Pet, 08/10/2018 - 19:21
  • Firefox DevEdition 62 Beta 18 Testday, August 17th

    We are happy to let you know that Friday, August 17th, we are organizing Firefox 62 DevEdition Beta 18 Testday. We’ll be focusing our testing on Activity Stream, React Animation Inspector and Toolbars & Window Controls features. We will also have fixed bugs verification and unconfirmed bugs triage ongoing.

  • How to DoH-only with Firefox

    Firefox supports DNS-over-HTTPS (aka DoH) since version 62.

    You can instruct your Firefox to only use DoH and never fall-back and try the native resolver; the mode we call trr-only. Without any other ability to resolve host names, this is a little tricky so this guide is here to help you. (This situation might improve in the future.)

    In trr-only mode, nobody on your local network nor on your ISP can snoop on your name resolves. The SNI part of HTTPS connections are still clear text though, so eavesdroppers on path can still figure out which hosts you connect to.

    [...]

    network.trr.uri - set this to the URI of the DoH server you want to use. This should be a server you trust and want to hand over your name resolves to. The Cloudflare one we've previously used in DoH tests with Firefox is https://mozilla.cloudflare-dns.com/dns-query.

  • #5 State of Mozilla Support: 2018 Mid-year Update – Part 5

    We are happy to share with you the final post of the series, which started with two external research report analyses, moved on to sharing updates and plans for support forums, social support, and localization, and now is about to conclude with our strategic summary.

  • Rep of the Month – July 2018

    Please join us in congratulating Lívia Takács, our Rep of the Month for July 2018!

    Livia is a UI developer and visual designer from Hungary and has been part of the Reps program for a bit more than a year. In that time she organized a lot of events with different communities (like LibreOffice) and also workshops.

  • Updated Firefox 61.0.2 includes Bug Fixes and Automatic Recovery feature for Windows

    The latest update to Firefox 61.0.2 adds support for automatic restoring of Firefox session after Windows is restarted. Presently this feature is not available by default for majority of users but will possibly be enabled gradually in the coming few weeks.

  • Make your Firefox browser a privacy superpower with these extensions

    Privacy is important for everyone, but often in different ways. That’s part of why Firefox Extensions are so powerful. Starting with a browser like Firefox, that’s built for privacy out of the box, you can use extensions to customize your browser to suit your personal privacy needs.

  • The Video Wars of 2027

    This post imagines a dystopian future for web video, if we continue to rely on patented codecs to transmit media files. What if one company had a perpetual monopoly on those patents? How could it limit our access to media and culture? The premise of this cautionary tale is grounded in fact. However, the future scenario is fiction, and the entities and events portrayed are not intended to represent real people, companies, or events.

    [...]

    In 1998, the U.S. Congress passed the Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act. This new law extended copyrights on corporate works to the author’s lifetime plus 95 years. The effort was driven by the Walt Disney Company, to protect its lucrative retail franchise around the animated character Mickey Mouse. Without this extension, Mickey would have entered the public domain, meaning anyone could create new cartoons and merchandise without fear of being sued by Disney. When the extension passed, it gave Disney another 20 years to profit from Mickey. The news sparked outrage from lawyers and academics at the time, but it was a dull and complex topic that most people didn’t understand or care about.

    In 2020, Disney again lobbied to extend the law, so its copyright would last for 10,000 years. Its monopoly on our culture was complete. No art, music, video, or story would pass into the public domain for millennia. All copyrighted ideas would remain the private property of corporations. The quiet strangulation of our collective creativity had begun.

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ClickUp – An Awesome Project Management and Productivity App

tuxmachines.org - Pet, 08/10/2018 - 19:17

ClickUp is a productivity platform that provides a fundamentally new way to work. More than just task management – ClickUp offers notes, reminders, goals, calendar, scheduling, and even an inbox. Fully customizable, ClickUp works for every type of team, so all teams can use the same app to plan, organize, and collaborate.

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Red Hat and Fedora

tuxmachines.org - Pet, 08/10/2018 - 19:12

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Security: Firewalld, NSA, WPA, Supply-chain Attacks and Facebook

tuxmachines.org - Pet, 08/10/2018 - 19:10
  • Firewalld: The Future is nftables

    Firewalld, the default firewall management tool in Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora, has gained long sought support for nftables. This was announced in detail on firewalld’s project blog. The feature landed in the firewalld 0.6.0 release as the new default firewall backend.

  • How SELinux helps mitigate risk while facilitating compliance

    Many of our customers are required to meet a variety of regulatory requirements. Red Hat Enterprise Linux includes security technologies that help meet these requirements. Improving Linux security also benefits our layered products, such as Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform and Red Hat OpenStack Platform.

  • WPA3: How and why the Wi-Fi standard matters

    WPA2 has given us 14 years of secure wireless networking. WPA3 will fix a number of big problems in WPA2 and make strong security the default condition.

  • How one man could have hacked every Mac developer (73% of them, anyway)

    OK, in some ways that’s only very loosely true, when you think of all the non-Unixy stuff on top of the Darwin base layer, and we welcome your comments below to explain just how carelessly loose we have been…

    [...]

    The potential impact of a well-thought-out hack into one of the many package management ecosystems out there is a pet concern of security researcher Eric Holmes.

    Hacks against the very repositories that many of us rely upon for software updates are known in the jargon as supply-chain attacks – after all, the modern supply chain often doesn’t involve any factories, ships, trains, inventories, trucks, pallets or forklifts.

    So, Holmes decided to take a look at the supply chain for Homebrew, or Brew for short – we’re guessing he picked Brew not only because he knew it was the most popular amongst the Mac community, but also because he uses it himself.

    The results were, in a word, salutary.

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Fizz

    In order to implement the new generation of Transport Layer Security, TLS 1.3, at Facebook, the company built a TLS library in C++ 14 called Fizz. Earlier this week, Facebook announced it was open sourcing that library.

    TLS 1.3 added several new features to make Internet traffic more secure, such as encrypting handshake methods, redesigning how secret keys are derived, and a zero round-trip connection setup.

    “We are excited to be open-sourcing Fizz to help speed up deployment of TLS 1.3 across the internet and help others make their apps and services faster and more secure,” Facebook wrote in a post.

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Elementary OS Juno Brings Only Slight Changes to an Outstanding Platform

tuxmachines.org - Pet, 08/10/2018 - 18:32

Elementary OS has been my distribution of choice for some time now. I find it a perfect blend of usability, elegance, and stability. Out of the box, Elementary doesn’t include a lot of apps, but it does offer plenty of style and all the apps you could want are an AppCenter away. And with the upcoming release, the numbering scheme changes. Named Juno, the next iteration will skip the .5 number and go directly to 5.0. Why? Because Elementary OS is far from a pre-release operating system and the development teams wanted to do away with any possible confusion.

Elementary, 0.4 (aka Loki) is about as stable a Linux operating system as I have ever used. And although Elementary OS 5.0 does promise to be a very natural evolution from .4, it is still very much in beta, but ready for testing. Because Juno is based on Ubuntu 18.04, it enjoys a rock-solid base, so the foundation of the OS will already be incredibly stable.

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Rugged Jetson TX2 carrier hosts up to six HD cameras for cars, bots, and drones

tuxmachines.org - Pet, 08/10/2018 - 18:29

Aetina announced a Linux-driven, 87 x 70mm “ACE-N310” carrier board for Nvidia’s Jetson TX1/TX2/TX2i modules with up to 12x MIPI-CSI-2 lanes and 6x optional cameras, as well HDMI, USB 3.0, and GbE ports and -40 to 85°C support.

Aetina has launched its first carrier board for Nvidia’s Jetson TX1 and TX2 modules that supports up to 6x cameras and offers -40 to 85°C support. The ACE-N310 enables “360° surrounded view application in vehicles, drones, robots, surveillance and automation and intelligent systems at the edge,” says Aetina. With the help of the Jetson modules’ AI-enabled Pascal GPU, the ACE-N310 lets you build multi-visual intelligent systems with advanced on-premises analytics and inference, says the company.

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GNOME: GSoC 2018, AbiWord, Developer Center Initiative, LVFS

tuxmachines.org - Pet, 08/10/2018 - 18:22
  • GSoC 2018: Overview

    Throughout the summer I was working on librsvg, a GNOME library for rendering SVG files to Cairo surfaces. This post is an overview of the work I did with relevant links.

  • GSoC 2018: Parallelizing Filters with Rayon

    I’m working on SVG filter effects in librsvg, a GNOME library for rendering SVG files to Cairo surfaces. After finishing porting all filters from C to Rust and adding tests, I started investigating the filter performance. With the codebase converted to Rust, I am able to confidently apply important optimizations such as parallelization. In this post I’ll show how I parallelized two computation-intensive filter primitives.

  • AbiWord: It's alive

    No, AbiWord is not dead. The project has been very very slow moving due to very little contributions. But sometime a spark ignite things.

    Martin needed to fix a major issue we had related to how AbiWord uses Gtk wrong

    Then I took some time to perform two long overdue tasks:

    1. Moving to git. We have had a complete mirror of the Subversion repository for a few years on Github. But now that GNOME moved to their own Gitlab, I felt that this was a more appropriate place for AbiWord. So we did. Thanks to Carlos Soriano, AbiWord is now hosted in GNOME World.

  • Developer Center Initiative – Meeting Summary 8th August

    Yesterday we had the second meeting about the Developer Center Initiative. We had 14 attendees with participation from HotDoc, GJS, Purism, Builder and more.

    The primary topic for this week was to let developers review and demonstrate website prototypes based on different technologies. This is where we would like your opinion too! We are particularly interested in choosing the solution which..

  • It’s Now Easier to Install ThinkPad Firmware Updates on Linux

    It’s about to get a whole lot easier to install ThinkPad firmware updates on Linux.

    Red Hat’s Richard Hughes has revealed that tech company Lenovo, who produce the ThinkPad line of laptops, is joining the Linux Vendor Firmware Service, better known as the LVFS.

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6 Reasons Why Linux Users Switch to BSD

tuxmachines.org - Pet, 08/10/2018 - 18:08

Thus far I have written several articles about BSD for It’s FOSS. There is always at least one person in the comments asking “Why bother with BSD?” I figure that the best way to respond was to write an article on the topic.

Also: LibreSSL 2.8.0 Released

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Linux Foundation: Academy, Wall Street and Surveillance Giants

tuxmachines.org - Pet, 08/10/2018 - 17:47
  • The Academy teams up with the Linux Foundation for open source tech
  • Academy Software Foundation will let filmmakers use open source creative software

    The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and The Linux Foundation today launched the Academy Software Foundation (ASWF) to provide a neutral forum for open source software developers in the motion picture and broader media industries to share resources and collaborate on technologies for image creation, visual effects, animation, and sound.

  • Hollywood Goes Open Source: Academy Teams Up With Linux Foundation to Launch Academy Software Foundation

    Hollywood now has its very own open source organization: The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has teamed up with the Linux Foundation to launch the Academy Software Foundation, which is dedicated to advance the use of open source in film making and beyond.

    The association’s founding members include Animal Logic, Autodesk, Blue Sky Studios, Cisco, DNEG, DreamWorks, Epic Games, Foundry, Google Cloud, Intel, SideFX, Walt Disney Studios and Weta Digital. Together, they want to promote open source, help studios and others in Hollywood with open source licensing issues and manage open source projects under the helm of the Software Foundation.

    The cooperation between the Academy and the Linux Foundation began a little over two years ago, when the Academy’s Science and Technology Council began to look into Hollywood’s use of open source software. “It’s the culmination of a couple of years of work,” said Industrial Light & Magic (ILM) head Rob Bredow in an interview with Variety this week.

  • Hollywood gets its own open-source foundation

    Open source is everywhere now, so maybe it’s no surprise that the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (yes, the organization behind the Oscars) today announced that it has partnered with the Linux Foundation to launch the Academy Software Foundation, a new open-source foundation for developers in the motion picture and media space.

    The founding members include a number of high-powered media and tech companies, including Animal Logic, Blue Sky Studios, Cisco, DreamWorks, Epic Games, Google, Intel, SideFX, Walt Disney Studios and Weta Digital.

  • The Linux Foundation Announces Keynote Speakers for All New Open FinTech Forum to Explore the Intersection of Financial Services and Open Source
  • The Linux Foundation Announces Keynote Speakers for All New Open FinTech Forum to Explore the Intersection of Financial Services and Open Source

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the keynote speakers for Open FinTech Forum, taking place October 10-11 in New York.

  • LF Deep Learning signs up 5 more members, names AT&T's Gilbert as governing board chair

    The Linux Foundation's LF Deep Learning Foundation announced it has added Ciena, DiDi, Intel, Orange and Red Hat to its membership roster.

    Open source communities truly thrive when there's an array of vendors and service providers adding to the collective brain trust. With the recent additions, Deep Learning now has 15 members since it was first formed earlier this year.

    The addition of Orange was notable, but Deep Learning is still missing some key service provider players, such as Verizon, BT, CenturyLink, Deutsche Telekom and Telefónica, which seem content to pursue machine learning and artificial intelligence on their own.

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Social Mapper Debut

tuxmachines.org - Pet, 08/10/2018 - 17:44
  • Social Mapper: A free tool for automated discovery of targets’ social media accounts

    The tool takes advantage of facial recognition technology and searches for targets’ accounts on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Instagram, VKontakte, Weibo and Douban.

  • Social Mapper uses facial recognition to track 'targets' on social media

    RESEARCHERS at US security company Trustwave have released a rather scary new open source tool called 'Social Mapper' that can be used to track "targets" across social media networks using facial recognition.

    The potentially-devious tool works by taking an "automated approach" to searching popular social media sites for names and pictures of people you're looking to track. It can accurately detect and group a person's presence, outputting the results into a report that a human operator can quickly review.

    "Performing intelligence gathering is a time-consuming process, it typically starts by attempting to find a person's online presence on a variety of social media sites," the company asked itself in a news release announcing the software.

  • Social Mapper: This Open Source Tool Lets “Good” Hackers Track People On Social Media

    There are tons of automated tools and services that any shady hacker can employ to grab the public data on Facebook, Twitter, Google, or Instagram, and use it for notorious purposes. But what about the ethical hackers and security researchers who are looking for a means to achieve the same?

    To tackle this issue, security firm Trustwave has released an open source tool that can reduce the time being consumed for such intelligence collection process at a large scale. Called Social Mapper, the tool uses facial recognition to connect the dots on different social media and collect data.

  • Need a facial recognition auto-doxxx tool? Social Mapper has you covered

    Finding people's social media profiles can be a slow and manual business – so why not get facial recognition to help?

    That's the pitch coming from Trustwave's SpiderLabs, which wants to make life easier for penetration testers trying to infiltrate clients' networks and facilities using social engineering and targeted hackery.

    SpiderLabs' Jacob Wilkin explained that new tool Social Mapper can start with the name of an organisation on LinkedIn, a folder full of named images, or a CSV listing of names with URLs to images. With those inputs, he explained this week, the software's facial recognition capabilities can “correlate social media profiles across a number of different sites on a large scale.”

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