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LWN.net is a comprehensive source of news and opinions from and about the Linux community. This is the main LWN.net feed, listing all articles which are posted to the site front page.
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Mena Quintero: Paying technical debt in our accessibility infrastructure

Čet, 08/04/2022 - 14:47
On his blog, Federico Mena Quintero posted a transcript of his recent talk at GUADEC 2022 on the technical debt in the GNOME accessibility infrastructure—and what he has been doing to help pay that down. He began the talk by describing the infrastructure and how it came about: Gnome-shell implements its own toolkit, St, which stands for "shell toolkit". It is made accessible by implementing the GObject interfaces in atk. To make a toolkit accessible means adding a way to extract information from it in a standard way; you don't want screen readers to have separate implementations for GTK, Qt, St, Firefox, etc. For every window, regardless of toolkit, you want to have a "list children" method. For every widget you want "get accessible name", so for a button it may tell you "OK button", and for an image it may tell you "thumbnail of file.jpg". For widgets that you can interact with, you want "list actions" and "run action X", so a button may present an "activate" action, and a check button may present a "toggle" action.

However, ATK is just abstract interfaces for the benefit of toolkits. We need a way to ship the information extracted from toolkits to assistive tech like screen readers. The atspi protocol is a set of DBus interfaces that an application must implement; atk-adaptor is an implementation of those DBus interfaces that works by calling atk's slightly different interfaces, which in turn are implemented by toolkits. Atk-adaptor also caches some things that it already asked to the toolkit, so it doesn't have to ask again unless the toolkit notifies about a change.

Does this seem like too much translation going on? It is! We will see the reasons behind that when we talk about how accessibility was implemented many years ago in GNOME.

Security updates for Thursday

Čet, 08/04/2022 - 14:18
Security updates have been issued by Fedora (lua), Oracle (kernel), Red Hat (389-ds:1.4, django, firefox, go-toolset and golang, go-toolset-1.17 and go-toolset-1.17-golang, go-toolset:rhel8, java-1.8.0-ibm, java-17-openjdk, kernel, kernel-rt, kpatch-patch, mariadb:10.5, openssl, pcre2, php, rh-mariadb105-galera and rh-mariadb105-mariadb, ruby:2.5, thunderbird, vim, and virt:rhel and virt-devel:rhel), Scientific Linux (firefox and thunderbird), SUSE (drbd, java-17-openjdk, java-1_8_0-ibm, keylime, ldb, samba, mokutil, oracleasm, pcre2, permissions, postgresql-jdbc, python-numpy, samba, tiff, u-boot, and xscreensaver), and Ubuntu (nvidia-graphics-drivers-390, nvidia-graphics-drivers-450-server, nvidia-graphics-drivers-470, nvidia-graphics-drivers-470-server, nvidia-graphics-drivers-510, nvidia-graphics-drivers-510-server, nvidia-graphics-drivers-515, nvidia-graphics-drivers-515-server).

LWN.net Weekly Edition for August 4, 2022

Čet, 08/04/2022 - 02:45
The LWN.net Weekly Edition for August 4, 2022 is available.

[$] Oaxaca, Endless OS, and indigenous languages

Sre, 08/03/2022 - 21:29
A rural Mexican state was the setting for an initiative to use the GNOME-based Endless OS to improve education in indigenous communities. Over the last several years, the Endless OS Foundation has teamed up with the Fundación Alfredo Harp Helú Oaxaca (FAHHO) to deliver offline-first computers to those communities, but also to assist these communities in preserving their native languages. In a talk at GUADEC 2022, Rob McQueen provided a look at the project and what it has accomplished.

Four more stable kernel updates

Sre, 08/03/2022 - 14:59
The 5.18.16, 5.15.59, 5.10.135, and 5.4.209 stable kernel updates have been released; each contains another set of important fixes.

Vetter: Locking engineering hierarchy

Sre, 08/03/2022 - 14:42
Daniel Vetter continues his series on locking in the kernel.

This part goes through a pile of locking pattern and designs, from most favourable and easiest to adjust and hence resulting in a long term maintainable code base, to the least favourable since hardest to ensure it works correctly and stays that way while the code evolves. For convenience even color coded, with the dangerous levels getting progressively more crispy red indicating how close to the burning fire you are! Think of it as Dante’s Inferno, but for locking.

Security updates for Wednesday

Sre, 08/03/2022 - 13:45
Security updates have been issued by CentOS (389-ds-base, firefox, java-1.8.0-openjdk, java-11-openjdk, kernel, postgresql, python, python-twisted-web, python-virtualenv, squid, thunderbird, and xz), Fedora (ceph, firefox, java-1.8.0-openjdk, java-11-openjdk, java-17-openjdk, java-latest-openjdk, and kubernetes), Oracle (firefox, go-toolset and golang, libvirt libvirt-python, openssl, pcre2, qemu, and thunderbird), SUSE (connman, drbd, kernel, python-jupyterlab, samba, and seamonkey), and Ubuntu (linux-oem-5.14, linux-oem-5.17 and ntfs-3g).

[$] Crosswords for GNOME

Tor, 08/02/2022 - 21:32
Jonathan Blandford, who is a longtime GNOME contributor—and a cruciverbalist for longer still—thought it was time for GNOME to have a crossword puzzle application. So he set out to create one, which turned into something of a yak-shaving exercise, but also, ultimately, into Crosswords. Blandford came to GUADEC 2022 to give a talk describing his journey bringing this brain exerciser (and productivity bane) to the GNOME desktop.

Go 1.19 released

Tor, 08/02/2022 - 19:09
Version 1.19 of the Go programming language has been released. "Most of its changes are in the implementation of the toolchain, runtime, and libraries. As always, the release maintains the Go 1 promise of compatibility. We expect almost all Go programs to continue to compile and run as before". This release includes some memory-model tweaks, a LoongArch port, improvements in the documentation-comment mechanism, and more.

GNU C Library 2.36 released

Tor, 08/02/2022 - 14:11
Version 2.36 of the GNU C Library has been released. Changes include support for the new DT_RELR relocation format, wrappers for the process_madvise(), process_mrelease(), pidfd_open(), pidfd_getfd(), and pidfd_send_signal() system calls, wrappers for the new filesystem mounting API, a DNS stub resolver that only does IPv4 queries, support for the BSD arc4random() API (despite some last-minute discussion), LoongArch architecture support, and more.

Security updates for Tuesday

Tor, 08/02/2022 - 13:59
Security updates have been issued by Debian (curl and jetty9), Fedora (dovecot), Gentoo (vault), Scientific Linux (java-1.8.0-openjdk, java-11-openjdk, and squid), SUSE (booth, dovecot22, dwarves and elfutils, firefox, gimp, java-11-openjdk, kernel, and oracleasm), and Ubuntu (linux, linux-hwe-5.15, linux-lowlatency, linux-lowlatency-hwe-5.15, net-snmp, and samba).

[$] Some 5.19 development statistics

Pon, 08/01/2022 - 18:23
The 5.19 kernel was released, after a one-week delay to deal with the fallout from the Retbleed mitigations, on July 31. By that time, 16,399 commits (15,134 non-merge and 1,265 merges) had found their way into the mainline repository, making this development cycle the busiest since 5.13 (16,030 non-merge changesets and 1,157 merges). Tradition dictates that now is the time for a look at where the changes in 5.19 came from, and we've learned not to go against tradition.

The 2022 Linux Plumbers Conference schedule is out

Pon, 08/01/2022 - 17:54
The 2022 Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) has announced its schedule. The conference will be held in Dublin, Ireland, September 12-14. The schedule for when the miniconferences and tracks are going to occur is now posted at: https://lpc.events/event/16/timetable/#all

The runners for the miniconferences will be adding more details to each of their schedules over the coming weeks.

The Linux Plumbers Refereed track schedule and Kernel Summit schedule is now available at: https://lpc.events/event/16/timetable/#all.detailed

The leads for the networking and toolchain tracks will be adding more details to each of their schedules over the coming weeks, as well.

Security updates for Monday

Pon, 08/01/2022 - 14:25
Security updates have been issued by Debian (booth, libpgjava, and thunderbird), Fedora (3mux, act, age, antlr4-project, apache-cloudstack-cloudmonkey, apptainer, aquatone, aron, asnip, assetfinder, astral, bettercap, buildah, butane, caddy, cadvisor, cheat, chisel, clash, clipman, commit-stream, containerd, cri-o, darkman, deepin-gir-generator, direnv, dnscrypt-proxy, dnsx, docker-distribution, doctl, douceur, duf, ffuf, fzf, geoipupdate, git-lfs, git-octopus, git-time-metric, glide, gmailctl, gnutls, go-bindata, goaltdns, gobuster, godep, godoctor, godotenv, gojq, golist, goloris, gomtree, google-guest-agent, gotags, gotun, grafana, gron, grpcurl, hakrevdns, hcloud, htmltest, httprobe, hulk, ignition, jid, kata-containers, kiln, kompose, kubernetes, libldb, manifest-tool, mass3, meg, meshbird, micro, mingw-harfbuzz, mingw-poppler, moby-engine, mqttcli, nats-server, nebula, netscanner, oci-seccomp-bpf-hook, ohmybackup, onionscan, open-policy-agent, origin, osbuild-composer, podman-tui, popub, powerline-go, reposurgeon, restic, runc, samba, shellz, shhgit, skopeo, snapd, snowcrash, source-to-image, subfinder, syncthing, sysutil, terrier, thunderbird, tiedot, toolbox, vgrep, vultr, vultr-cli, webanalyze, webkit2gtk3, weldr-client, wgctrl, xe-guest-utilities-latest, xen, xq, yggdrasil, yubihsm-connector, and a vast number of golang packages), Mageia (chromium-browser-stable, firefox, gdk-pixbuf2.0, python-ujson, and webmin), Red Hat (firefox and thunderbird), Slackware (gnutls), and SUSE (chromium, firefox, mozilla-nss, rubygem-tzinfo, samba, and xen).

The 5.19 kernel is out

Ned, 07/31/2022 - 23:29
Linus has released the 5.19 kernel.

On a personal note, the most interesting part here is that I did the release (and am writing this) on an arm64 laptop. It's something I've been waiting for for a _loong_ time, and it's finally reality, thanks to the Asahi team. We've had arm64 hardware around running Linux for a long time, but none of it has really been usable as a development platform until now.

He also notes that the next kernel is likely to be 6.0.

Significant features in 5.19 include Arm Scalable Matrix Extension support, a number of io_uring improvements, BIG TCP support, numerous random-number generator improvements, support for AMD's Secure Nested Paging and Intel's Trusted Domain Extensions mechanisms, support for the Loongson "LoongArch" CPU architecture, a new proactive reclaim mechanism, and more. See the LWN merge-window summaries (part 1, part 2) and the KernelNewbies 5.19 page for more information.

Linux Mint 21 released

Ned, 07/31/2022 - 21:56
Version 21 of the Ubuntu-based Linux Mint distribution is out; it is available in the Cinnamon, MATE, and Xfce flavors. This is a long-term-support release that will receive updates until 2027.

Linux Mint 21 released

Ned, 07/31/2022 - 21:56
Version 21 of the Ubuntu-based Linux Mint distribution is out; it is available in the Cinnamon, MATE, and Xfce flavors. This is a long-term-support release that will receive updates until 2027.

Kicinski: TLS 1.3 Rx improvements in Linux 5.20

Ned, 07/31/2022 - 20:57
Jakub Kicinski provides an overview of some changes to the in-kernel TLS implementation coming in the next development cycle:

The first implementation of kTLS was designed in the good old days of TLS 1.2. When TLS 1.3 came into the picture the interest in kTLS had slightly diminished and the implementation, although functional, was rather simple and did not retain all the benefits. This post covers developments in the Linux 5.20 implementation of TLS which claws back the performance lost moving to TLS 1.3.

Kicinski: TLS 1.3 Rx improvements in Linux 5.20

Ned, 07/31/2022 - 20:57
Jakub Kicinski provides an overview of some changes to the in-kernel TLS implementation coming in the next development cycle:

The first implementation of kTLS was designed in the good old days of TLS 1.2. When TLS 1.3 came into the picture the interest in kTLS had slightly diminished and the implementation, although functional, was rather simple and did not retain all the benefits. This post covers developments in the Linux 5.20 implementation of TLS which claws back the performance lost moving to TLS 1.3.

Seven new stable kernels

Pet, 07/29/2022 - 17:11
Greg Kroah-Hartman has announced the release of the 5.18.15, 5.15.58, 5.10.134, 5.4.208, 4.19.254, 4.14.290, and 4.9.325 stable kernels. As usual, these kernels contain important fixes throughout the tree. Note that the Retbleed mitigations have not been backported any further back than the 5.10.x series at this point.
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