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LWN.net is a comprehensive source of news and opinions from and about the Linux community. This is the main LWN.net feed, listing all articles which are posted to the site front page.
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Vcc: a Clang compiler for Vulkan

Tor, 01/09/2024 - 20:32
The Vcc compiler has been announced.

It’s exactly what the name implies: a clang-based compiler that outputs code that runs on Vulkan.

Vcc can be thought of as a GLSL and HLSL competitor, but the true intent of this project is to retire the concept of shading languages entirely. Unlike existing shading languages, Vcc makes a honest attempt to bring the entire C/C++ language family to Vulkan, which means implementing a number of previously unseen features in Vulkan shaders

The OpenWrt One project

Tor, 01/09/2024 - 18:05
OpenWrt developer John Crispin says: "In 2024 the OpenWrt project turns 20 years! Let's celebrate this anniversary by launching our own first and fully upstream supported hardware design." The rest of the message describes the proposed OpenWrt-native network-routing system, based on Banana Pi boards; the project is being organized through the Software Freedom Conservancy. (Thanks to Dave Täht).

Leemhuis: Regression tracking: state of the union early 2024

Tor, 01/09/2024 - 17:53
Thorsten Leemhuis writes about his plans for improving the kernel's regression handling in the coming year.

Top-priority will be "make regzbot more useful for kernel subsystem maintainers" from now on. My tracking efforts of course will continue, but everything except regressions in the current and the previous mainline cycle might not see much attention from my side. This refocusing also means that I won't work much on resolving some ambiguities around "how regressions are supposed to be handled" which lead to tension quite a few times. But all that should be for the best in the long term.

Shaw: Python 3.13 gets a JIT

Tor, 01/09/2024 - 16:21
Anthony Shaw describes the new copy-and-patch JIT that has been proposed for Python 3.13.

Copy-and-patch was selected because the compilation from bytecodes to machine code is done as a set of “templates” that are then stitched together and patched at runtime with the correct values. This means that your average Python user isn’t running this complex JIT compiler architecture inside their Python runtime. Python writing it’s own IL and JIT would also be unreasonable since so many are available off-the-shelf like LLVMs and ryuJIT. But a full-JIT would require those being bundled with Python and all the added overheads. A copy-and-patch JIT only requires the LLVM JIT tools be installed on the machine where CPython is compiled from source, and for most people that means the machines of the CI that builds and packages CPython for python.org.

Solus 4.5 released

Tor, 01/09/2024 - 16:00
Version 4.5 ("Resilience") of the Solus distribution has been released. "This release brings updated applications and kernels, refreshed software stacks, a new installer, and a new ISO edition featuring the XFCE desktop environment."

Security updates for Tuesday

Tor, 01/09/2024 - 15:50
Security updates have been issued by Debian (squid), Fedora (podman), Mageia (dropbear), SUSE (eclipse-jgit, jsch, gcc13, helm3, opusfile, qt6-base, thunderbird, and wireshark), and Ubuntu (clamav, libclamunrar, and qemu).

[$] Some 6.7 development statistics

Pon, 01/08/2024 - 19:08
The 6.7 kernel was released on January 7 after a ten-week development cycle. This was, as it turns out, the busiest cycle ever with regard to the number of changesets merged. The time has come for our usual look at where all those changesets came from, with a side trip into how long kernel developers tend to stick around.

Three new stable kernels

Pon, 01/08/2024 - 15:48
Greg Kroah-Hartman has announced the release of the 5.4.266, 4.19.304, and 4.14.335 stable kernels. They contain important fixes throughout the kernel tree.

Security updates for Monday

Pon, 01/08/2024 - 15:25
Security updates have been issued by Debian (exim4), Fedora (chromium, perl-Spreadsheet-ParseExcel, python-aiohttp, python-pysqueezebox, and tinyxml), Gentoo (Apache Batik, Eclipse Mosquitto, firefox, R, Synapse, and util-linux), Mageia (libssh2 and putty), Red Hat (squid), SUSE (libxkbcommon), and Ubuntu (gnutls28).

The 6.7 kernel has been released

Ned, 01/07/2024 - 21:48
Linus has released the 6.7 kernel.

End result: 6.7 is (in number of commits: over 17k non-merge commits, with 1k+ merges) one of the largest kernel releases we've ever had, but the extra rc8 week was purely due to timing with the holidays, not about any difficulties with the larger release.

Some of the headline features in this release are: the removal of support for the Itanium architecture, the first part of the futex2 API, futex support in io_uring, the BPF exceptions mechanism, the bcachefs filesystem, the TCP authentication option, the kernel samepage merging smart scan mode, and networking support for the Landlock security module. See the LWN merge-window summaries (part 1, part 2) and the (in-progress) KernelNewbies 6.7 page for more information.

[$] Kernel-text replication on NUMA systems

Pet, 01/05/2024 - 16:41
Kernel developers often go out of their way to reduce the memory used by the kernel itself; that memory is not available for the workloads that people are actually interested in running on their systems. Lower memory usage also tends to lead to better performance overall. But there are times when the expenditure of some extra memory can make the system faster. The replication of the kernel's text (executable code) and read-only data across a NUMA system may be a case in point; patch sets have been posted adding that capability to two architectures.

Four stable kernels released

Pet, 01/05/2024 - 15:57
The 6.6.10, 6.1.71, 5.15.146, and 5.10.206 stable kernels have been released. They contain numerous important fixes, as usual.

Security updates for Friday

Pet, 01/05/2024 - 15:45
Security updates have been issued by Debian (asterisk, chromium, exim4, netatalk, and tomcat9), Fedora (chromium), Gentoo (BlueZ, c-ares, CUPS filters, RDoc, and WebKitGTK+), Oracle (firefox, squid:4, thunderbird, and tigervnc), SUSE (python-aiohttp and python-paramiko), and Ubuntu (linux-intel-iotg).

[$] The return of None-aware operators for Python

Pet, 01/05/2024 - 01:24
The saga of the None-aware (or null-coalescing) operators for Python continues. We last looked in on the topic a little over a year ago and noted that either adoption or a clear rejection of the idea might help tamp down its regular recurrence. That has not happened, so, predictably, it was raised again—and does not look any closer to resolution this time around.

Computer science pioneer Niklaus Wirth passes away (ITWire)

Čet, 01/04/2024 - 16:30
ITWire covers the passing of Niklaus Wirth.

Wirth is well-remembered for his pioneering work in programming languages and algorithms. For these achievements, he received the ACM Turing Award in 1984, inducted as a Fellow of the ACM in 1994, and a Fellow of the Computer History Museum in 2004.

They include, among many, being chief designer for the programming languages Euler (1965), PL360 (1966), ALGOL W (1968), Pascal (1970), Modula (1975), Modula-2 (1978), Oberon (1987), Oberon-2 (1991), and Oberon-07 (2007).

Security updates for Thursday

Čet, 01/04/2024 - 15:29
Security updates have been issued by Oracle (firefox, gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free, thunderbird, tigervnc, and xorg-x11-server), Red Hat (squid:4), SUSE (exim, libcryptopp, and proftpd), and Ubuntu (openssh and sqlite3).

[$] LWN.net Weekly Edition for January 4, 2024

Čet, 01/04/2024 - 02:40
The LWN.net Weekly Edition for January 4, 2024 is available.

[$] Smuggling email inside of email

Sre, 01/03/2024 - 23:42
Normally, when a new vulnerability is discovered and releases are coordinated with those affected, the announcement is done at a convenient time—not generally right before the end-of-year holidays, for example. The SMTP Smuggling vulnerability has taken a different path, however, with its announcement landing on December 18. That may well have been unpleasant for some administrators that had not yet updated, but it was particularly problematic for some projects that had not been made aware of the vulnerability at all—though it was known to affect several open-source mailers.

Lenôtre: Maestro - Introduction

Sre, 01/03/2024 - 17:05
On his blog, Luc Lenôtre introduces Maestro, "a Unix-like kernel and operating system written from scratch in Rust". Maestro is intended to be "lightweight and compatible-enough with Linux to be usable in everyday life". The project began, in C, back in 2018, but switched over to Rust after a year-and-a-half. The current status: Maestro is a monolithic kernel, supporting only the x86 (in 32 bits) architecture for now.

At the time of writing, 135 out of 437 Linux system calls (roughly 31%) are more or less implemented. The project has 48 800 lines of code across 615 files (all repositories combined, counted using the cloc command).

There is a Hacker News discussion of the project as well.

Vim 9.1 released

Sre, 01/03/2024 - 16:36
Version 9.1 of the Vim editor has been released. "This release is dedicated to Bram Moolenaar, Vim's lead developer for more than 30 years, who passed away half a year ago. The Vim project wouldn't exist without his work". Changes include new support for classes and objects in the scripting language, smooth scrolling support, an EditorConfig plugin, and more.
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