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OBS Studio is an open source video recorder and streaming app for Windows, Linux and macOS

Čet, 10/10/2019 - 19:55

OBS Studio aka Open Broadcaster Software Studio is very popular among YouTube users. You can use it to broadcast gameplay streams live or use it to record videos (which you may then upload to YouTube or other video hosting sites). Want to set up a camera and mic to record content for your vlog? You can do that too.

This is one of those rare applications that is user-friendly on the one hand but still advanced enough to deliver the options that advanced users require. That being said, we're going to take a look at the basic usage of the program, the recording of on-screen content.

OBS Studio is a cross-platform program that is available for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux.

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Tiny Rock Pi S and NanoPi Neo2 Black boards debut

Čet, 10/10/2019 - 19:53

Radxa has opened $9.90 pre-orders for its tiny “Rock Pi S” SBC, which runs Linux on a quad -A35 RK3308. Meanwhile, FriendlyElec will soon ship a “NanoPi Neo2 Black” spin of the 40 x 40mm, Allwinner H5-based NanoPi Neo2 that adds eMMC, but reduces GPIO.

Over the last year, the focus of the community-backed Linux hacker board scene has shifted from tiny, power-sipping SBCs for IoT to more muscular, often AI-enabled boards selling for $50 to $100 built around processors such as the RK3399 and RK3399 Pro and Amlogic S922x and Amlogic A311D. But tiny boards are back with the pre-release launch of Radxa’s previously teased, 43.2 x 43.2mm Rock Pi S and the eminent release of a new 40 x 40mm NanoPi Neo2 LTS variant called the NanoPi Neo2 Black (see farther below).

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today's leftovers

Čet, 10/10/2019 - 17:29
  • Collapse OS is a Special Operating System for the Post-Apocalyptic Future

    As reported by Motherboard, there’s a new open-source operating system that is currently under heavy development, and it looks like it will soon be ready for a very dire scenario. Its creator, Virgil Dupras, is a person who believes there’s a good chance that by 2030, the world will have collapsed. The software developer isn’t absolutely certain about this, but he believes that the chances of the scenario are high enough to justify the development of a post-apocalyptic operating system, called “Collapse OS”.

    So, what would the ideal scavenger’s operating system be like? The simple answer to this would be “one that can run on virtually anything”. If there is one system out there that can run on almost any hardware, this is the Debian GNU/Linux distribution. Collapse OS is taking things a lot further, being able to run on microcontrollers such as the ubiquitous Z80 microprocessor. Dupras considered what piece of hardware would be the easiest to find in a post-apocalyptic world, and Z80 came as the definitive answer. This 8-bit microprocessor is in cash registers, computers, music instruments, calculators, and virtually anything electronic.

  • PostgreSQL considers seccomp() filters

    A discussion on the pgsql-hackers mailing list at the end of August is another reminder that the suitability of seccomp() filters is likely more narrow than was hoped. Applying filters to the PostgreSQL database is difficult for a number of reasons and the benefit for the project and its users is not entirely clear. The discussion highlights the tradeoffs inherent in adding system-call filtering to a complex software suite; it may help crystallize the thinking of other projects that are also looking at supporting seccomp() filters.

    Joe Conway raised the idea in an RFC patch posting. It added a way to filter system calls in the main postmaster process and, with a separate system-call list, in the per-session backends. It also showed how to generate the list of system calls that are being used by PostgreSQL under various workloads, such as the test targets in the Makefile or by running a specific application. Information on the system calls made is logged by the audit subsystem; those logs are then processed to produce the list. Once there is confidence that the list is complete—which may be a sticking point—the remaining system calls could be blocked so that executing them would cause an error.

    But Peter Eisentraut was concerned that the list is going to be incomplete due to the "fantastic test coverage" needed to generate it and that it will require constant maintenance to keep up with GNU C Library (glibc) and other changes. Beyond that, PostgreSQL extensions will need their own lists of allowed system calls. Conway seems to see the support as something that those interested will maintain for themselves, rather than having a list that the project will distribute. "Perhaps most people never use this, but when needed (and increasingly will be required) it is available."

  • mjbots quad A0: October 2019 Roadmap

    My last video gave an overview of what I’ve accomplished over the past year. Now, let me talk about what I’m planning to work on going forward:

    I intend to divide my efforts into two parallel tracks. The first is to demonstrate increased capabilities and continue learning with the existing quad A0, and second is to design and manufacture the next revision of all its major components.

  • Philip Chimento: Free software at 40°C

    It’s that time of year again, time for a belated reflection on the GUADEC conference!

    In August I traveled to Thessaloniki, Greece, to attend first the annual GNOME Foundation board handover day, then the advisory board meeting, then the GUADEC conference and associated unconference days.

    The board discussion focused quite a lot on the strategic goals for the GNOME Foundation which you can hear more about in executive director Neil McGovern’s talk. Nuritzi has also blogged about the process of putting together these strategic goals.

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KDE Applications 19.08.2 Open-Source Software Suite Released with Many Bug Fixes

Čet, 10/10/2019 - 17:10

Coming a month after the first point release, KDE Applications 19.08.2 is here to address more than 20 bug fixes across a wide range of applications and core components, including Dolphin, Gwenview, Kate, Kdenlive, Kontact, Konsole, Lokalize, Spectacle, and many others, in an attempt to make the KDE Applications 19.08 open-source software suite more stable and reliable.

Highlights of this release include improvements to High-DPI (HiDPI) support in the Konsole terminal emulator and other apps, the ability to update the search parameters when switching between different searches in the Dolphin file manager, and support for the KMail email client to save messages directly to remote folders.

Also: Applications 19.08.2

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ImCompressor is a New, User-Friendly Image Compressor for Linux

Čet, 10/10/2019 - 17:05

It’s written with Python and Gtk and designed to the GNOME HIG. This helps it both look great and integrate well with modern Linux distros, like Fedora and Ubuntu.

The design of the app makes it incredibly simple to use, too.

Open ImCompressor and drag and drop jpeg and png images on to the window (or select files through the in-app file picker) to quickly, losslessly, optimise them, i.e. reduce image file size without affecting the overall image quality.

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Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu 19.10 vs. Clear Linux vs. Debian 10.1 Benchmarks On An Intel Core i9

Čet, 10/10/2019 - 16:48

Earlier this week I provided some fresh Windows vs. Linux web browser benchmarks for both Firefox and Chrome. For those curious how the current Windows 10 vs. Linux performance is for other workloads, here is a fresh look across a variety of software applications and while testing the near-final Ubuntu 19.10, Intel's rolling-release Clear Linux, and Debian 10.1 while running off an Intel Core i9 HEDT platform.

Ahead of all our autumn 2019 Linux distribution update benchmarks, this article is a fresh look at the Microsoft Windows 10 Pro x64 performance compared to these popular Linux distributions. Particularly with Debian 10 and Clear Linux, they tend to be the fastest Linux distributions we routinely benchmark at Phoronix while Ubuntu is included due to its popularity.

These four operating systems were all tested on the same Intel Core i9 7980XE + 4 x 4GB DDR4-3200 memory + NVIDIA GeForce GTX TITAN X + Samsung 970 EVO 500GB NVMe SSD system with the i9-7980XE being the newest Intel HEDT platform I have available for testing at the moment.

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System76 Launches Two Linux Laptops Powered by Coreboot Open-Source Firmware

Čet, 10/10/2019 - 16:47

Driven by the idea that technology should always be free and open, System76 is launching today the Galago Pro and Darter Pro laptops with their new Coreboot-based open-source firmware, which not only makes these computers boot faster than with a proprietary firmware, but it also protects them against various security vulnerabilities and other threats.

"Our lightweight open source firmware gets users from boot screen to desktop 29% faster," said System76. "Removing unnecessary features from the firmware such as network connectivity and execution environments also decreases the potential for vulnerability, meaning users who upgrade to the new laptops will benefit from increased security."

Also: System76 Will Begin Shipping 2 Linux Laptops With Coreboot-Based Open Source Firmware

System76 launches two Linux with Comet Lake chips and Coreboot

System76 Launches Two Intel Laptops With "Open-Source Firmware" Coreboot

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KDE is All About the Apps: October Update

Čet, 10/10/2019 - 16:24

We are a community of thousands of contributors who make hundreds of Apps using collaborative open source methods. Our apps run on Linux with Plasma, of course, but also fit in well with GNOME, Enlightenment, XFCE, or any other desktop you happen to be using. Many of our apps run on Windows, Android and macOS.

A new goal for the KDE community is to push how we are All About the Apps. We will be highlighting our best software and promoting it to increase its adoption outside the circle of current KDE fans (who we still love very much!). This is a monthly update of what's new in our apps. If you'd like to help out with this community goal, take a look at the All About the Apps workboard, and join us in our Matrix chat channel.

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Qt for Android better than ever before

Čet, 10/10/2019 - 16:22

As you already know KDAB is the largest independent contributor to Qt code. Of course we didn’t get lazy and we’ve added a lot of cool stuff to Qt 5.14.

In this article I’m going to write about the super cool stuff that we’ve added to Qt 5.14 for Android.

Folks, this is the biggest feature added to Qt on Android since I made the Qt on Android port! I dreamt on this change for a very loong time! I found that is possible to add such support to qmake by mistake. I had to do some work on Windows (which is not my platform of choice) and there I found that debug and release builds are different on Windows, the makefiles generated by qmake will build twice your source files.

This was exactly what I needed to add multi abi for Android! A few days later I had a WIP patch and, with the help of The Qt Company people, we landed the change in Qt 5.14 alpha!

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Proprietary Software Leftovers

Čet, 10/10/2019 - 15:41
  • Discord Confirms Layoffs After Internal Restructuring

    The truth is that Discord has had a really complicated 2018 year. After overcoming the barrier of 250 million registered users, last September they canceled their subscription service, Discord Nitro, which allowed access to different video games through a monthly payment. The company wrote in its blog that users were not playing the games in the Nitro subscription.

    Discord made headlines last December when they changed the policy of percentage of profits that the developers who published their video games took on their platform, a kind of counterattack to Steam and Epic Games Store after their two changes at the end of last year.

  • DJs You Are Warned ⁠— Do NOT Upgrade Into MacOS Catalina

    With the removal of iTunes in Catalina, users lost support for XML files and native playback on Macs. The XML file loss is a massive blow to most DJ software, which relies on the format for setlist organization.

    Popular DJ apps like Traktor and Rekordbox read these XML files. iTunes has been the default way that many DJs find their tracks for years now. With Music replacing iTunes in Catalina, there’s no feature parity there.

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Programming Leftovers

Čet, 10/10/2019 - 15:39
  • DevSecOps pipelines and tools: What you need to know

    DevOps is well-understood in the IT world by now, but it's not flawless. Imagine you have implemented all of the DevOps engineering practices in modern application delivery for a project. You've reached the end of the development pipeline—but a penetration testing team (internal or external) has detected a security flaw and come up with a report. Now you have to re-initiate all of your processes and ask developers to fix the flaw.

    This is not terribly tedious in a DevOps-based software development lifecycle (SDLC) system—but it does consume time and affects the delivery schedule. If security were integrated from the start of the SDLC, you might have tracked down the glitch and eliminated it on the go. But pushing security to the end of the development pipeline, as in the above scenario, leads to a longer development lifecycle.

    This is the reason for introducing DevSecOps, which consolidates the overall software delivery cycle in an automated way.

    In modern DevOps methodologies, where containers are widely used by organizations to host applications, we see greater use of Kubernetes and Istio. However, these tools have their own vulnerabilities. For example, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) recently completed a Kubernetes security audit that identified several issues. All tools used in the DevOps pipeline need to undergo security checks while running in the pipeline, and DevSecOps pushes admins to monitor the tools' repositories for upgrades and patches.

  • Interview with a Pornhub Web Developer

    Regardless of your stance on pornography, it would be impossible to deny the massive impact the adult website industry has had on pushing the web forward. From pushing the browser's video limits to pushing ads through WebSocket so ad blockers don't detect them, you have to be clever to innovate at the bleeding edge of the web.

    I was recently lucky enough to interview a Web Developer at the web's largest adult website: Pornhub. I wanted to learn about the tech, how web APIs can improve, and what it's like working on adult websites. Enjoy!

  • Indie game makers open up about the money they actually make

    The following 12 testimonies detail appropriately varied situations — the hopes and fears of these indie game makers — and how, ultimately, they’re able to continue sustaining themselves.

  • PHP version 7.2.24RC1 and 7.3.11RC1

    Release Candidate versions are available in testing repository for Fedora and Enterprise Linux (RHEL / CentOS) to allow more people to test them. They are available as Software Collections, for a parallel installation, perfect solution for such tests, and also as base packages.

    RPM of PHP version 7.3.11RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 30-31 or remi-php73-test repository for Fedora 29 and Enterprise Linux.

    RPM of PHP version 7.2.24RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 29 or remi-php72-test repository for Enterprise Linux.

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Security Leftovers

Čet, 10/10/2019 - 15:27
  • Intimate Details on Healthcare Workers Exposed as Cloud Security Lags

    The database was set to be publicly accessible, and anyone could edit, download or delete data without administrative credentials, he said. That’s worrying given the sensitive nature of the information he found.

    [...]

    Surveying over 3,000 IT and IT security practitioners in Australia, Brazil, France, Germany, India Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States, the data shows that nearly half (48 percent) of organizations have a multi-cloud strategy, with Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure and IBM being the top three. The study found that, on average, organizations use three different cloud service providers, and more than a quarter (28 percent) are using four or more.

    The research also found somewhat schizophrenic attitudes towards security in the cloud. For instance, nearly half of survey respondents (46 percent) believe that storing consumer data in the cloud makes them more of a security risk; and more than half (56 percent) also noted that it poses a compliance risk. However, only 23 percent say security is a factor in selecting a cloud provider.

  • After banning working cryptography and raiding whistleblowers, Australia's spies ban speakers from national infosec conference

    This year, AISA opted to co-organise its annual conference with the Australian Cyber Security Centre, a creature of the same spy agencies that led the crackdown on whistleblowers in June.

    But the ACSC has a very different set of priorities to AISA, which is why it insisted on the cancellation of multiple invited talks at the show, including Thomas Drake, a celebrated NSA whistleblower who was scheduled to give a talk on "the golden age of surveillance, both government and corporate"; and the University of Melbourne's Dr Suelette Dreyfus whose cancelled lecture was on "anonymous whistleblowing technologies like SecureDrop and how they reduce corruption in countries where that is a problem."

    Both speakers have posted their slides, and Bruce Schneier, who gave a keynote at the conference, opened his talk by reading the URLs aloud.

    But the censorship doesn't stop there: ACSC also demanded that invited speaker Ted Ringrose (partner at the Ringrose Siganto law firm) remove criticism in his speech on Australia's ban on working cryptography, going so far as to edit his slides to remove "bias." (Ringrose refused and was allowed to give his original talk as planned).

  • U.S. and U.K. agencies warn consumers to update VPN technologies from Fortinet, Pulse Secure and Palo Alto Networks.

    State-sponsored advanced persistent threat (APT) groups are using flaws in outdated VPN technologies from Palo Alto Networks, Fortinet and Pulse Secure to carry out cyber attacks on targets in the United States and overseas, warned U.S. and U.K. officials.

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Chromium in Ubuntu – deb to snap transition

Čet, 10/10/2019 - 15:17

Chromium is a very popular web browser, the fully open source counterpart to Google Chrome. On Ubuntu, Chromium is not the default browser, and the package resides in the ‘universe’ section of the archive. Universe contains community-maintained software packages. Despite that, the Ubuntu Desktop Team is committed to packaging and maintaining Chromium because a significant number of users rely on it.

Maintaining a single release of Chromium is a significant time investment for the Ubuntu Desktop Team working with the Ubuntu Security team to deliver updates to each stable release. As the teams support numerous stable releases of Ubuntu, the amount of work is compounded.

Comparing this workload to other Linux distributions which have a single supported rolling release misses the nuance of supporting multiple Long Term Support (LTS) and non-LTS releases.

Google releases a new major version of Chromium every six weeks, with typically several minor versions to address security vulnerabilities in between. Every new stable version has to be built for each supported Ubuntu release − 16.04, 18.04, 19.04 and the upcoming 19.10 − and for all supported architectures (amd64, i386, armhf, arm64).

Additionally, ensuring Chromium even builds (let alone runs) on older releases such as 16.04 can be challenging, as the upstream project often uses new compiler features that are not available on older releases.

In contrast, a snap needs to be built only once per architecture, and will run on all systems that support snapd. This covers all supported Ubuntu releases including 14.04 with Extended Security Maintenance (ESM), as well as other distributions like Debian, Fedora, Mint, and Manjaro.

Also: [Older] Packaging Domoticz for Debian, Ubuntu, Raspbian and Fedora

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Linux Foundation and FSF Announcements

Čet, 10/10/2019 - 15:11
  • The Zephyr Project Welcomes Eclipse IoT and Oticon As Members to Create a Safe and Secure RTOS

    The Zephyr™ Project, an open source project at the Linux Foundation that aims to build a secure and flexible real-time operating system (RTOS) for the Internet of Things (IoT) announces its growing ecosystem with the addition of Eclipse IoT and the move up for long-time member Oticon to Platinum member. Additionally, the project announces the release of Zephyr 2.0.0 and that several popular developer boards are now shipping with Zephyr including Nordic Semiconductor’s Nordic Thingy91 and Adafruit’s Actinius Icarus.

    In today’s technology landscape, fragmentation is the biggest challenge. Developers have a wide range of choices for platforms, boards and components and many of those don’t and can’t connect with each other. Zephyr offers a small memory footprint and a secure and flexible RTOS that extends functionality of IoT devices. It is a customizable, embedded open source platform that can be built for multiple hardware architectures with safety and security.

  • Zephyr RTOS 2.0 Release Highlights

    Last month, the Zephyr Project announced the release of Zephyr RTOS 2.0 and we are excited to share the details with you! Zephyr 2.0 is the first release of Zephyr RTOS after the 1.14 release with Long-Term support in April 2019. It is also a huge step up from the 1.14 release, bringing a wide list of new features, significant enhancements in existing features, as well as a large list of new HW platforms and development boards.

  • LibrePlanet 2020 IRC CFS Office Hours

    The LibrePlanet call for sessions is open now and will be open until November 20 and we want to hear from you!

    Speaking at a conference, and even submitting a proposal, can be intimidating or hard. Luckily, some great, experienced speakers are volunteering their time to help out during the CFS Office Hours.

  • Meet the FSF staff in Raleigh, NC on October 15

    Executive director John Sullivan, licensing and compliance manager Donald R. Robertson, III, copyright and licensing associate Craig Topham, and program manager Zoë Kooyman, will all be in Raleigh, NC on October 15th, in anticipation of this year's licensing seminar on GPL Enforcement and Legal Ethics.

    We look forward to hosting this informal meetup to show our appreciation for your support of the FSF's work. We'll share some bites and drinks while giving you the opportunity to meet other FSF associate members and supporters while learning about what the FSF is currently working on. We are curious to hear your thoughts, and would love to answer any questions you may have.

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KDE and openSUSE, YaST Development Sprint

Čet, 10/10/2019 - 14:54
  • KDE and openSUSE: Plasma 5.17, Qt 5.14 and more

    The Beta version of Plasma 5.17 was released with many new features and improvements such as per-screen fractional scaling on Wayland, a new User Interface (UI) for configuring permissions of Thunderbolt devices and network statistics in KSysGuard. The latter requires some more privileges than usual for a user application, so is currently being looked at by the SUSE security team.

    openQA found a few bugs already, like GIMP looking more “colorful” than usual and some applications mixing Kirigami and Qt Widgets breaking some keyboard shortcuts. Both of those were addressed meanwhile and will be fixed in the final release of 5.17.

    If you haven’t tested the Plasma 5.17 Beta yet, there’s still some time left! If you come across a problem in the software, please head over to the KDE bug tracker; if instead you find an issue that is openSUSE specific, go over to the openSUSE bugzilla.

  • Highlights of YaST Development Sprint 86

    Now that you had a chance to look at our post about Advanced Encryption Options (especially if you are an s390 user), it is time to check what happened during the last YaST development sprint, which finished last Monday.

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KDE Wayland Goal and Krita's Magnetic Lasso

Čet, 10/10/2019 - 14:52
  • Wayland goal - Call for Action

    KDE community has elected to finalize the transition to Wayland and embrace the future of desktop.

    This entails making Plasma running smoothly under Wayland, but also making sure KDE Apps can run without bugs and missing features. It also means that we want to help the wider Wayland community to fill missing features and fix bugs.

    I call App users and developers to try out their favorite app in Wayland and report the issue that may arise. and add wayland as keyword to the bug to keep track on those bugs.

  • [Krita] To be Merged in master

    So, finally it seems like, after crossing the deadline by a couple months, Magnetic Lasso is going to get merged, as Boud told me. Lets see how many more weeks it takes, so presumably it is complete feature wise but who knows from where a bug might pop up. This post is mainly for documenting how the Magnetic Lasso works, since I am too good to make an entry in the manual.

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Audiocasts/Shows: Xfce 4.14 Desktop, TLLTS and Jupiter Shows

Čet, 10/10/2019 - 14:45
  • What’s New in Xfce 4.14 Desktop

    After 4 years and 5 months of development, Xfce 4.14 was finally released. a release that it is probably included in the software repositories of almost all Linux-based operating systems. The goal for Xfce 4.14, as the developers explain, was to port all of the core components to the latest GTK3 and GDBus open-source technologies, instead of the old GTK2 and D-Bus Glib.

    Window manager Xfce 4.14, now support VSync to reduce display flickering. It also now supports HiDPI, NVIDIA proprietary/closed source drivers, XInput2. XFCE 4.14 also introduces a new default theme.

    A new default theme is present as well in Xfce 4.14, and the Thunar file manager now features a completely revamped pathbar, BluRay support for the volume manager, support for larger thumbnails, improved keyboard navigation, and support for a “folder.jpg” file to alter the folder’s icon.

    XFCE 4.14 Panel got support for RandR’s primary monitor feature, improved window grouping in the tasklist plugin (better UX, visual group indicator etc), a per-panel “icon-size” setting, a new default clock format. Users can also now change the orientation of the icons on the desktop, as well as to preview Fujifilm RAF images in the file manager.

  • Home Network Under $200 | Self-Hosted 3

    How far can you get with a Raspberry Pi 4? We go all in and find out.

    Plus our favorite travel router with WireGuard built in, and Chris kicks off Project Off-Grid. Meanwhile, Alex adopts proprietary software.

  • Lack Rack, Jack | BSD Now 319

    Causing ZFS corruption for fun, NetBSD Assembly Programming Tutorial, The IKEA Lack Rack for Servers, a new OmniOS Community Edition LTS has been published, List Block Devices on FreeBSD lsblk(8) Style, Project Trident 19.10 available, and more.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 828
  • 2019-10-09 | Linux Headlines

    SUSE drops OpenStack Cloud, OpenLibra looks to piggyback on Facebook's cryptocurrency, OpenSSH adds in-RAM protections and Essential teases flashy new phone.

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