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Kernel: New Kernel.org Page, Linux 5.3 Previews/Features, and AMD Graphics

Sre, 07/10/2019 - 19:13
  • Active kernel releases

    Many Linux distributions provide their own "longterm maintenance" kernels that may or may not be based on those maintained by kernel developers. These kernel releases are not hosted at kernel.org and kernel developers can provide no support for them.

    It is easy to tell if you are running a distribution kernel. Unless you downloaded, compiled and installed your own version of kernel from kernel.org, you are running a distribution kernel. To find out the version of your kernel, run uname -r:

  • Linux 5.3 Media Driver Updates Bring New Amlogic Meson Video Decoder

    After going through 9+ rounds of revisions for the Amlogic video decode driver, it's now been part of the media subsystem updates for the Linux 5.3 kernel.

    This Amlogic video decode driver supports the GXBB/GXL/GXM chipsets and allows currently MPEG-1/MPEG-2 decoding with future work to tackle MPEG-4, H.264, HEVC, and VP9.

  • Linux 5.3 Crypto Updates Jitter RNG, Adds xxHash

    Herbert Xu sent out the crypto subsystem updates on Monday for the in-development Linux 5.3 kernel.

    Linux 5.3 is bringing an updated Jitter RNG implementation based on the upstream Jitter 2.1.2 spec with various alterations. There is also now support for the SHA204A random number generator, 5-way interleave support for ECB/CBC/CTR for 64-bit ARM, and other fixes.

  • Raspberry Pi CPUFreq Driver & Other Power Management Work For Linux 5.3

    The power management changes for Linux 5.3 merge window don't offer any P-State changes or other prominent Intel changes this cycle but there is some other improvements as well as new CPUFreq drivers for CPU frequency scaling.

    Arguably the biggest Linux 5.3 power management change is the mainline addition of a CPUFreq driver for Raspberry Pi. This CPUFreq driver communicates with the firmware running on the dedicated processor responsible for clock adjustments. This firmware ends up making the final call on whether to honor requests for CPU clock changes based upon thermal and power criteria.

  • AMD Opens Up Its Contrast Adaptive Sharpening Under FidelityFX On GPUOpen

    Following the Radeon RX 5700 series launch, AMD has now open-sourced their Contrast Adaptive Sharpening (CAS) technology under FidelityFX on GPUOpen. 

    Contrast Adaptive Sharpening provides sharpening and optional scaling and is implemented as HLSL and GLSL shaders for Direct3D and Vulkan. CAS is designed to provide better sharpness with fewer artifacts and to increase the quality of temporal anti-aliasing. 

    The GLSL/Vulkan shaders for CAS are obviously relevant to Linux gamers though this initial FidelityFX release appears catered to a Windows workflow. FidelityFX 1.0 / CAS is licensed under the MIT license. 

  • AMDGPU & RadeonSI Linux Drivers See More Navi Optimizations + Fixes

    t's just not the RADV Vulkan driver seeing lots of Navi activity but the AMDGPU DRM kernel driver and RadeonSI OpenGL Mesa driver are also off to the races in improving their newly-enabled Navi / Radeon RX 5700 series support. 

    On the AMDGPU kernel side, AMD longtime Linux developer Alex Deucher sent out a new PR containing some additional fixes for Navi. This pull request is for the now-open Linux 5.3 merge window to polish up this initial GPU enablement for the kernel. 

    The Navi 10 work that's new for AMDGPU is GPU reset abilities in case of hangs, PowerPlay power management fixes, and graphics fixes. Outside of Navi specific work there is also XGMI fixes, HMM API changes, and other fixes. 

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Sculpt OS release 19.07

Sre, 07/10/2019 - 19:04

The most prominent user-visible feature of Sculpt OS 19.07 is the ability of copy and paste text between terminals, graphical applications, and virtual machines. Our unique take on this feature is described in a dedicated article.

Also: Genode's Sculpt OS 19.07 Brings Performance Improvements

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Testing Picture-in-Picture for videos in Firefox 69 Beta and Developer Edition

Sre, 07/10/2019 - 19:00

Have you ever needed to scan a recipe while also watching a cooking video? Or perhaps you wanted to watch a recording of a lecture while also looking at the course slides. Or maybe you wanted to watch somebody stream themselves playing video games while you work.

We’ve recently shipped a version of Firefox on our Beta and Developer Edition release channels with an experimental feature that aims to make this easier for you to do!

Picture-in-Picture allows you to pop a video out from where it’s being played into a special kind of window that’s always on top. Then you can move that window around or resize it however you need!

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Qubes OS 4.0.2-rc1 has been released!

Sre, 07/10/2019 - 18:40

A point release does not designate a separate, new version of Qubes OS. Rather, it designates its respective major or minor release (in this case, 4.0) inclusive of all updates up to a certain point. Installing Qubes 4.0 and fully updating it results in the same system as installing Qubes 4.0.2.

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4 Process Managers for Node.js Applications in Linux

Sre, 07/10/2019 - 18:37

A Node.js process manager is a useful tool to ensure that a Node.js process or script runs continuously (forever) and can enable it to auto-start at system boot.

It allows you to monitor the running services and it facilitates common system administration tasks (such as restarting on failure, stopping, reloading configurations without downtime, modify environment variables/settings, showing performance metrics and so much more). It also supports application logging, clustering, and load balancing, and so many other useful process management features.

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Ubuntu: What does the future look like post-Unity?

Sre, 07/10/2019 - 18:12

Following Canonical's pivot away from its internally-developed Unity user interface and Mir display server, Ubuntu has enjoyed two relatively low-drama years, as the Linux Desktop market homogenized during its transition back to a customized GNOME desktop. In a review of the most recent release, TechRepublic's Jack Wallen declared that "Ubuntu 19.04 should seriously impress anyone looking for a fast and reliable Linux desktop platform."

Largely, it's been a slow-and-steady pace for Ubuntu since the pivot from Unity to GNOME, though the distribution made headlines for plans to end support for 32-bit support. This prompted Valve, operators of games marketplace Steam, to re-think its approach toward Ubuntu, which it previously characterized as "as the best-supported path for desktop users."

TechRepublic's James Sanders interviewed Will Cooke, director of engineering for Ubuntu Desktop at Canonical, about the distribution's long-term plans for legacy 32-bit support, shipping a desktop in a post-Unity-era Ubuntu, and why Linux should be the first choice for users migrating from Windows 7 prior to the end of support.

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Address Space Isolation and the Linux Kernel

Sre, 07/10/2019 - 18:08

Mike Rapoport from IBM launched a bid to implement address space isolation in the Linux kernel. Address space isolation emanates from the idea of virtual memory—where the system maps all its hardware devices' memory addresses into a clean virtual space so that they all appear to be one smooth range of available RAM. A system that implements virtual memory also can create isolated address spaces that are available only to part of the system or to certain processes.

The idea, as Mike expressed it, is that if hostile users find themselves in an isolated address space, even if they find bugs in the kernel that might be exploited to gain control of the system, the system they would gain control over would be just that tiny area of RAM to which they had access. So they might be able to mess up their own local user, but not any other users on the system, nor would they be able to gain access to root level infrastructure.

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Stable kernels 5.1.17, 4.19.58, 4.14.133, 4.9.185, and 4.4.185

Sre, 07/10/2019 - 18:04
  • Linux 5.1.17

    I'm announcing the release of the 5.1.17 kernel.

    All users of the 5.1 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 5.1.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.1.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 4.19.58
  • Linux 4.14.133
  • Linux 4.9.185
  • Linux 4.4.185

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KMyMoney 5.0.5 released

Sre, 07/10/2019 - 17:57

The KMyMoney development team today announces the immediate availability of version 5.0.5 of its open source Personal Finance Manager.

After three months it is now ready: KMyMoney 5.0.5 comes with some important bugfixes. As usual, problems have been reported by our users and the development team worked hard to fix them in the meantime. The result of this effort is the brand new KMyMoney 5.0.5 release.

Despite even more testing we understand that some bugs may have slipped past our best efforts. If you find one of them, please forgive us, and be sure to report it, either to the mailing list or on bugs.kde.org.

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Games: Flux Caves, UnderMine, Tactics V: Obsidian Brigade, and Elsinore

Sre, 07/10/2019 - 17:50
  • 3D puzzle game "Flux Caves" fully released, now has Linux support again

    When trying out Flux Caves myself back in March, I was quite impressed with the demo. It recently released in full and as of today, the Linux version is live everywhere.

    Unlike some puzzle games, the aim of Flux Caves is not to make you sweat or get frustrated. It's supposed to be a more peaceful experience with a slightly open-world for you to run around in. There's no losing, no dying, just you and the puzzles.

  • Ready your pickaxe for "UnderMine", releasing with Linux support on August 20th

    Confirmed to be coming to Linux at the Early Access release on August 20th, UnderMine looks like a fantastic action-adventure roguelike.

  • Tactics V: Obsidian Brigade, a retro-style tactical turn-based RPG coming next month to Linux

    Here's another new game for you to keep an eye on, it's called Tactics V: Obsidian Brigade and it's arriving with Linux support on August 15th.

    In development by From Nothing Game Studios (previously made GravBlocks), it's inspired by the likes of Final Fantasy Tactics and other console tactical RPGs from the 1990s.

  • Time-looping adventure game "Elsinore" is releasing soon with Linux support

    After a successful crowdfunding campaign back in 2015, Elsinore a time-looping adventure game set in the world of Shakespeare's Hamlet is releasing with Linux support on July 22nd.

    This was previously mentioned on GamingOnLinux a few times, in our older crowdfunding roundup articles "The Funding Crowd". Some of you might actually remember it, I certainly didn't but I'm putting that right now by making sure everyone knows, as it does sound very interesting.

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Understanding Your Disk Space Through ‘df’ Command in Linux

Sre, 07/10/2019 - 14:39

The df command is used for checking disk space in Linux. Learn some of the most common usage of the df command in Linux.

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today's leftovers

Sre, 07/10/2019 - 11:52
  • IBM Completes The $34 Billion Red Hat Acquisition

    International Business Machines Corporation (IBM) has completed its acquisition of Red Hat for $34 billion, thus making it the world’s second-biggest technology acquisition ever. IBM has been struggling to adopt cloud-related technologies. With this deal, IBM will try to go after the market leaders like Amazon, Microsoft, and Google.

  • Radeon ROCm 2.6 Released - Without Navi Support But Adds BFloat16 & Other Features

    ROCm 2.6 was released overnight and when initially seeing this new Radeon Open Compute support come right after the Radeon RX 5700/5700XT launch, I was hopeful it would bring Navi support but sadly there are no signs of it in this release. But at least ROCm 2.6 is bringing other features.

    Radeon ROCm 2.6 brings various information reporting improvements, the first official release of rocThrust and hipCUB, MIGraphX 0.3 for reading models frozen from Tensorflow, MIOpen 2.0 with Bfloat16 support and other features, BFloat 16 for rocBLAS/Tensible, AMD Infinity Fabric Link support, RCCL2 support, rocFFT improvements, ROCm SMI fixes, and other enhancements.

  • Seems that the Linux version of Supraland will not be heading to GOG

    Supraland released for Linux on Steam on July 2nd and it just released on GOG today but it seems the Linux version will not be heading to GOG.

    What is Supraland? It's a very highly rated first-person action and puzzle game, inspired by the likes of Zelda, Metroid and Portal. It's popular, with an "Overwhelmingly Positive" rating on Steam from over two thousands user reviews and from my time spent in the demo, I can see why as it was pretty sweet.

  • Beware of some of the Qt 5.13 deprecation porting hints

    QComboBox::currentIndexChanged(QString) used to have (i.e. in Qt 5.13.0) a deprecation warning that said "Use currentTextChanged() instead".

    That has recently been reverted since both are not totally equivalent, sure, you can probably "port" from one to the other, but the "use" wording to me seems like a "this is the same" and they are not.

  • Sprint 3: Calendar management dialog, cleanups and bugfixes

    The calendar is a fresh new take on the previous one; the individual online accounts rows were removed in favor of delegating it all to GNOME Settings’ Online Accounts panel, navigation is easier and simpler, adding new calendars is a more intuitive operation, and it’s possible to toggle calendars right from the first page.

    I’m pretty happy with the rework itself, and splitting it in pages and a controller was definitely the right choice. It allowed implementing the same functionality in a much more well organized way.

  • Refreshed BL Helium ISOs with installation-time bugfix available

    After a non-security-critical installation-time bug was found due to expired repository signing keys in the old BL Helium installation ISOs, we just published a new set of Helium install ISOs that have been fixed. The ISO image files are available for direct download or via BitTorrent at the usual place.

    This issue only affected brand-new installations. If you already worked around the issue as suggested in our previous announcement, you don't have to do anything. Existing users of BL also do not need to do anything.

    Thanks to all users who reported the issue.

  • Android Microconference Accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the Android Microconference has been accepted into the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference! Android has a long history at Linux Plumbers and has continually made progress as a direct result of these meetings. This year’s focus will be a fairly ambitious goal to create a Generic Kernel Image (GKI) (or one kernel to rule them all!). Having a GKI will allow silicon vendors to be independent of the Linux kernel running on the device. As such, kernels could be easily upgraded without requiring any rework of the initial hardware porting efforts. This microconference will also address areas that have been discussed in the past.

  • GNR 85 – Twenty Minutes Boat Ride on a Paddle Steamer

    Dave kicks things off with a report from FOSS Talk Live 2019. Fab couldn’t make it but says he’s planning to go to this year’s OggCamp. We than discuss the news that Larian is doing Baldur’s Gate III.

    Naturally, we must also talk about Magic The Gathering, because it is the best game ever made. The new Core Set comes out this week!

  • Thank you for advancing free software: Read FSF spring news in the latest Bulletin

    Thirty-five volunteers joined FSF staff over the course of three days to get all the Bulletins stuffed in envelopes and mailed out. This was a great opportunity to catch up on free software issues with some of our most dedicated free software enthusiasts here in Boston. We are grateful to have such a strong core of supporters that keep the movement growing, and thanks to your generous contribution, we will be even stronger.

    Please be vocal about your support for free software. Read and share the Bulletin articles online using the #ISupportFreeSoftware hashtag, use our fundraiser support images, and talk to your community about why you support the FSF. It makes a difference.

    Throughout our spring fundraiser, we have been enjoying both the public posts from supporters using the hashtag on social media, as well as answers to the "What inspired you to join today?" question we ask new members. Here are some of our favorites.

  • June 2019: Photos from Brno

    Free Software Foundation president Richard Stallman (RMS) was in Brno, Czech Republic on June 6, 2019, to give two speeches.

    In the morning, he took part in the URBIS Smart City Fair, at the Brno Fair Grounds, giving his speech "Computing, freedom, and privacy."1

  • You can tinker with this conference badge

    The SMD Challenge was born from an insight into the human condition, as its creators explain:

    "Making LEDs blink is what people think make Makers happy, but they are wrong. Makers want to be miserable. They like to make mistakes and to have to try things over and over again. That which does not kill us, makes us stronger. This project will make you strong!"

    The SMD challenge is a badge you make yourself. This project starts with a relatively easy to solder resistor and LED. It then moves into increasingly tiny resistors and LEDs. Coming in both "Regular Edition" and "Misery Edition," the SMD challenge is designed to challenge—and break—all but the most determined solderers.

    If you do manage to make it all the way to the end (and can document your success), you can enter the prestigious 0201 Club. If you prefer to experience the misery (and success) secondhand, the club also features links showing many of the successful attempts.

  • UK ISPs Vilify Mozilla For Trying To Secure The Internet

    Over the years, UK ISPs have been forced by the government to censor an increasing array of "controversial" content, including copyrighted material and "terrorist content." In fits and spurts, the UK has also increasingly tried to censor pornography, despite that being a decidedly impossible affair. Like most global censorship efforts, these information blockades often rely on Domain Name Server (DNS) level blacklists by UK ISPs.

    Historically, like much of the internet, DNS hasn't been all that secure. That's why Mozilla recently announced it would begin testing something called "DNS over HTTPS," a significant security upgrade to DNS that encrypts and obscures your domain requests, making it difficult to see which websites a user is visiting. Obviously, this puts a bit of a wrinkle in the government, ISP, or other organizational efforts to use DNS records to block and filter content or track user activity.

  • [Microsoft] GitHub Bans Open Source DeepNude App And Other Projects Based On It

    GitHub has removed code that is based on DeepNude — an app that uses AI to digitally undress pictures of women and create fake nudes.

    While the maker of DeepNude has already shut down the project and made it illegal to use or possess copies of the app, multiple repositories based on the DeepNude algorithm have cropped up on GitHub and also on other platforms.

  • 'Deep Fake' Legislation Is On The Way, Threatening Free Speech Protections

    The proliferation of deep fake videos is going to start having an effect on First Amendment protections. Hint: it's not going to make these protections any stronger.

    "Deep fake" may be easier to define than "fake news," but that doesn't mean there won't be collateral damage. The issue isn't a new one. Faking reality has been around nearly as long as reality itself. Cheap tools that make this anyone's game is the only thing new. Before we had deep fakes, we had Photoshop and its imitators.

    Video used to be the last bulwark of truth. It couldn't be faked easily. But this too has been abused for years. Editing video to make it show what the editor wants it to show is a tactic that has been used for years. Now, however, tools make it possible to put new words in peoples' mouths, as was demonstrated to devastating satirical effect when a video of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg was tricked out to make it appear as though Zuckerberg was promising to swallow every user's data and privacy.

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Audio/Video: LINUX Unplugged, Linux Mint 19.2 Tina Backgrounds Slideshow and Mageia 7 Overview

Sre, 07/10/2019 - 11:51

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Programming Leftovers

Sre, 07/10/2019 - 11:45
  • How to teach software engineering students about the enterprise

    In this opinion article, you will find a set of suggestions for the inclusion of enterprise technology into software engineering courses. This piece goes through the difficulties that students face and proposes simplifications successfully used in the past. The continual advancement of enterprise technologies leads to a simplifying of the inclusion process in education.

    In the coming years, one can expect that industry demand for experts who know the technology used in enterprise development processes and production systems will increase. Academic institutions are here to prepare experts and leaders for industry, and thus they should know the technologies being used.

    It has been ten years since I taught my first software engineering course. Since then, I have taught this course every year. Many software engineering courses put emphasis on analysis and design from the abstract perspective, involving UML models and notations, and letting students develop software projects on their own.

  • Writing tests for Rust HTTP source | GSoC 2019

    My GSoC mentor, Sebastian Dröge coded the skeleton of the test with a basic unit test case for HTTP source plugin (aka reqwesthttpsrc). Here is the link to the merge request. The test was to check whether we receive the data correctly which is sent by the server. Here we make a hyper HTTP server which respond with "Hello World". Then we use our plugin to receive the data and we compare both. Also the interesting thing here is the Custom test harness which can be used to initialize a HTTP server with required behavior and our HTTP element with required properties set. We can use this to create the desired Harness for the any test case.

  • Wing Tips: Extending Wing with Python (Part 4 of 4)

    In this issue of Wing Tips we continue to look at how to extend Wing's functionality, by taking a closer look at at the scripting API and writing up a more complex script.

    If you haven't read the previous installments of this series, you may want to take a look at Part 1 where we introduced Wing's scripting framework and set up auto-completion for the scripting API, Part 2 where we used Wing to debug itself for easier extension script development, and Part 3 where we looked at how to collect arguments from the user.

  • Rust: How do we teach "Implementing traits in no_std for generics using lifetimes" without sutdents going mad?
  • A Brief Introduction To Markov Chains | Markov Chains In Python
  • How I learned Python Programming RAPIDLY!
  • Stop using indices!

    A very common things I see among my newer Python students is that often try to access values by index within loops. Part of this is down to experience in other programming languages, where this kind of pattern is common, but there are also situations where they just don't realise there's a better way. In this post, I want to show off some of those better ways so you can write more Pythonic loops, and ditch indices in favour of descriptive variable names.

  • This Week in Rust 294
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Week 6
  • How Tara AI Is Helping Developers Build Better Software Faster
  • 32-bit life support: Cross-compiling with GCC

    If you're a developer creating binary packages, like an RPM, DEB, Flatpak, or Snap, you have to compile code for a variety of different target platforms. Typical targets include 32-bit and 64-bit x86 and ARM. You could do your builds on different physical or virtual machines, but that means maintaining several systems. Instead, you can use the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) to cross-compile, producing binaries for several different architectures from a single build machine.

    Assume you have a simple dice-rolling game that you want to cross-compile. Something written in C is relatively easy on most systems, so to add complexity for the sake of realism, I wrote this example in C++, so the program depends on something not present in C (iostream, specifically).

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Security Leftovers

Sre, 07/10/2019 - 11:40
  • Matthew Garrett: Bug bounties and NDAs are an option, not the standard

    Zoom had a vulnerability that allowed users on MacOS to be connected to a video conference with their webcam active simply by visiting an appropriately crafted page. Zoom's response has largely been to argue that:

    a) There's a setting you can toggle to disable the webcam being on by default, so this isn't a big deal,
    b ) When Safari added a security feature requiring that users explicitly agree to launch Zoom, this created a poor user experience and so they were justified in working around this (and so introducing the vulnerability), and,
    c) The submitter asked whether Zoom would pay them for disclosing the bug, and when Zoom said they'd only do so if the submitter signed an NDA, they declined.

    (a) and (b ) are clearly ludicrous arguments, but (c) is the interesting one. Zoom go on to mention that they disagreed with the severity of the issue, and in the end decided not to change how their software worked. If the submitter had agreed to the terms of the NDA, then Zoom's decision that this was a low severity issue would have led to them being given a small amount of money and never being allowed to talk about the vulnerability. Since Zoom apparently have no intention of fixing it, we'd presumably never have heard about it. Users would have been less informed, and the world would have been a less secure place.

    [...]

    If your bug bounty requires people sign an NDA, you should think about why. If it's so you can control disclosure and delay things beyond 90 days (and potentially never disclose at all), look at whether the amount of money you're offering for that is anywhere near commensurate with the value the submitter could otherwise gain from the information and compare that to the reputational damage you'll take from people deciding that it's not worth it and just disclosing unilaterally. And, seriously, never ask for an NDA before you're committing to a specific $ amount - it's never reasonable to ask that someone sign away their rights without knowing exactly what they're getting in return.

  • Microsoft July 2019 Patch Tuesday fixes zero-day exploited by Russian hackers [Ed: Let's blame Russia instead of NSA back doors put there by Microsoft. More trash from CBS tabloid ZDNet.]

    Since the Microsoft Patch Tuesday is also the day when other vendors also release security patches, it's also worth mentioning that Adobe and SAP have also published their respective security updates earlier today.

  • William Brown: I no longer recommend FreeIPA

    The FreeIPA project focused on Kerberos and SSSD, with enough other parts glued on to look like a complete IDM project. Now that’s fine, but it means that concerns in other parts of the project are largely ignored. It creates design decisions that are not scalable or robust.

    Due to these decisions IPA has stability issues and scaling issues that other products do not.

    To be clear: security systems like IDM or LDAP can never go down. That’s not acceptable.

  • Ubuntu Source code is Safe in the Canonical GitHub account hacking!

    The canonical Security is once again under questionable notice. The forum has been hacked thrice on different occasions. In July 2013, details of 1.82 Million users were stolen by hackers followed by the second hacking where 2 million users data were stolen in July 2016 and in July 2019, the Github account of Canonical limited has been hacked.

    This company works behind the distribution of Ubuntu Linux and was hacked on July 6th, 2019. The Security team accepted that the Canonical owned account on Github was compromised on credentials and was used to create disturbance and issues among other activities. Though the company has removed the account from the organization in Github, it is still working on checking out the breach. The company believes that the source code or PII was affected in any way.

  • Azure Sphere OS Built on a Compact, Secured Linux

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Write a Novel with Open Source Tool

Sre, 07/10/2019 - 11:33

If you are looking for an open source tool to help you write your next novel, bibisco, ManusKript, and Plume Creator can help you get started.

Aspiring writers have no shortage of software that is supposed to help them along the road to a finished manuscript. Whether they are writing a short story or a multi-volume series, this software promises to organize them by providing software and revisable outlines, as well as a supposedly distraction-free full-screen mode and databases for characters, settings, objects, and drafts. On Windows and Mac, the leading software is Scrivener. However, since a Linux version of Scrivener has yet to reach general release, open source alternatives have sprung up like bibisco, Manuskript, and Plume Creator, each with its own approach to writing and outlining.

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Tails 3.15 is out

Sre, 07/10/2019 - 11:17

This release fixes many security vulnerabilities. You should upgrade as soon as possible.

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Septor 2019.4

Sre, 07/10/2019 - 11:14

Tor Browser is fully installed (8.5.4)
System upgrade from Debian Buster repos as of July 9, 2019
Update Linux kernel to 4.19.0-5
Update apt to 1.8.2
Update dpkg to 1.19.7
Update Thunderbird to 60.7.2-1
Update Hexchat to 2.13.2-4
Update youtube-dl to 2019.07.02
ISO Image Writer replaces Rosa Image Writer

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