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Events: Plasma Sprint, PyCon, SciPy and All Systems Go!

Tor, 07/16/2019 - 07:10
  • Plasma sprint, 2019 edition; personal updates

    In June, I had a great time at a series of KDE events held in the offices of Slimbook, makers of fantastic Neon-powered laptops, at the outskirts of Valencia, Spain. Following on from a two-day KDE e.V. board of directors meeting, the main event was the 2019 edition of the Plasma development sprint. The location proved to be quite ideal for everything. Slimbook graciously provided us with two lovely adjacent meeting rooms for Plasma and the co-located KDE Usability & Productivity sprint, allowing the groups to mix and seperate as our topics demanded - a well-conceived spatial analog for the tight relationship and overlap between the two.

    [...]

    In KDE e.V. news, briefly we stole one of the sprint rooms for a convenient gathering of most of our Financial Working Group, reviewing the implementation of the annual budget plan of the organization. We also had a chance to work with the Usability goal crew (have you heard about KDE goals yet?) on a plan for the use of their remaining budget -- it's going to be exciting.

    As a closing note, it was fantastic to see many new faces at this year's sprint. It's hard to believe for how many attendees it was their first KDE sprint ever, as it couldn't have been more comfortable to have them on board. It's great to see our team grow.

  • Real Python at PyCon US 2019
  • Quansight presence at SciPy'19

    Yesterday the SciPy'19 conference ended. It was a lot of fun, and very productive. You can really feel that there's a lot of energy in the community, and that it's growing and maturing. This post is just a quick update to summarize Quansight's presence and contributions, as well as some of the more interesting things I noticed.

  • ASG! 2019 CfP Re-Opened!

    Due to popular request we have re-opened the Call for Participation (CFP) for All Systems Go! 2019 for one day. It will close again TODAY, on 15 of July 2019, midnight Central European Summit Time! If you missed the deadline so far, we’d like to invite you to submit your proposals for consideration to the CFP submission site quickly! (And yes, this is the last extension, there's not going to be any more extensions.)

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GNOME: GSOC, GNOME Foundation, GLib

Tor, 07/16/2019 - 07:09
  • Gaurav Agrawal: GSOC Progress by Mid July

    July Marked the beginning of II GSOC coding month. This month our goal is to make the diff bar model as accurate and intuitive as possible.

    One of the biggest thing which I learnt so far is how to contribute on upstream repositories on which our project depends.

    In our case this was with Libgit2, we discovered a bug in Libgit2 while doing our project, and Albfan made this a perfect example to show me how to contribute on upstream, how to raise bugs and how to do discussions for getting it solved.

  • Jean-François Fortin Tam: Available for hire, 2019 edition

    Sometime after the end of my second term on the GNOME Foundation, I was contacted by a mysterious computer vendor that ships a vanilla GNOME on their laptops, Purism.

  • Array copying and extending in GLib 2.61.2

    A slightly more in-depth post in the mini-series this time, about various new functions which Emmanuel Fleury has landed in GLib 2.61.2 (which is due to be released soon), based on some old but not-quite-finished patches from others.

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Programming: Python, Vim, Go and More

Tor, 07/16/2019 - 07:05
  • How to integrate jenkins with webhook
  • Serving Gifs With Discord Bot - Reading Time: 12 Mins
  • Python Snippet 1: More Uses For Else
  • Python Celery Guide
  • Python String Find()
  • PyCharm 2019.2 Beta #2

    It hasn’t been long since we published PyCharm 2019.2 Beta, and now we’re ready to share with you the second Beta build! The final release date is getting closer and closer, and while you wait, give PyCharm 2019.2 Beta #2 a go! Get the PyCharm 2019.2 Beta build from our website and try all the latest functionality.

  • Vimrc Tutorial

    In this article, we’re going to dive deep into the vimrc file of Vim. Once you’re inside the vimscript, it’s easy to mess things up. That’s why this rule of thumb will always be helpful in your journey with Vim. Don’t put any line in vimrc that you don’t understand.

  • CPU atomics and orderings explained

    Sometimes the question comes up about how CPU memory orderings work, and what they do. I hope this post explains it in a really accessible way.

  • You can't say Go without Google – specifically, our little logo, Chocolate Factory insists

    Back in 2009, Google chose to name its latest programming language Go, a decision that is still giving it a migraine

    It could have called it "Google Go" to avoid confusion with Frank McCabe's Go! programming language. Despite criticism, it didn't do so. After almost a year of online grumbling, Google software engineer Russ Cox, in 2010, closed GitHub Issue #9, dismissing the complaints as "unfortunate."

    And the headaches over the thing's name still won't go away (no pun intended.) Last week, Google rebuffed a request to remove its logo from the Go website, golang.org, a change supported by some developers who feel Google takes Go developers for granted.

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Games: Kubernetes Within the Context of Video Games, Please, RetroArch

Tor, 07/16/2019 - 06:42
  • Kubernetes: The Video Game

    Grant Shipley was recently in China for KubeCon, where he gave a keynote talk explaining the Kubernetes ecosystem within the context of Video Games. It’s a fun way to examine the entire world of Kubernetes, from end to end, while also enabling Grant to make Mavis Beacon and Commodore 64 references. Take a gander!

  • Please, a tense ten-minute experience has a Linux build available

    Got a few minutes to burn? Why not try out the short experimental experience that Please offers. Developed by somewhat, it delivers something quite surreal and freaky.

  • Achievement Unlocked: RetroArch is Coming to Steam

    Fans of retro (and not so retro) gaming will be pleased to hear that RetroArch is coming to Steam.

    Not familiar with RetroArch? It’s a user-friendly GUI that makes use of the libretro API. That API allows developers to create, among other things, modular ‘libretro’ cores that act as game emulators for systems like the SNES, Mega Drive and Game Boy.

    The famed front-end for the popular Libretro API will be available to install on Steam for Windows from July 30. Linux and macOS versions will follow.

    The libretro cores that power RetroArch can be used with other compatible frontends (like GNOME Games app) but RetroArch is arguably the best one.

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IBM, Red Hat and Fedora

Tor, 07/16/2019 - 06:33
  • IBM Takes A Hands Off Approach With Red Hat

    IBM has been around long enough in the IT racket that it doesn’t have any trouble maintaining distinct portfolios of products that have overlapping and often incompatible functions. The System/3, which debuted in 1969, is only five years older than the System/360, which laid the foundation and set the pace for corporate computing when it launched in 1964. Both styles of machines continue to exist today as the IBM i on Power Systems platform and the System z.

    With the $34 billion acquisition of Red Hat, which closed last week, neither of those two legacy products are under threat and IBM does not seem to be inclined whatsoever in ceasing development of the legacy operating system and middleware stacks embodied in the IBM i and System z lines.

    As Arvind Krishna, senior vice president in charge of IBM’s cloud and cognitive software products, put it bluntly in a call after the deal closed, IBM’s customers expect for Big Blue to maintain its own operating systems, middleware, storage, databases, and security software in the IBM i, AIX, and System z lines, and that is precisely what Big Blue is going to do. Krisha estimated that there is only about 5 percent overlap in products between Big Blue and Red Hat – something we talked about at length when the deal was announced last October – and added that in many enterprise accounts that use both Red Hat and IBM platforms, companies invest in both sets of software for different purposes – perhaps using JBoss in one case and WebSphere in another, for instance.

  • Tech cos go for Edtech tie-ups to get that ready workforce

    Companies like Wipro, Accenture, IBM and others are tying up with edtech partners like upGrad, Simplilearn and Udacity to have a ready-trained workforce they can deploy on projects. Additional benefits include minimal training cost incurred post recruitment and a lesser churn as learners develop more ownership in their roles.

    The edtech firms provide campus recruits the required platform, content, assignments and project work in their last semester of college to ensure they are prepared with programming skills and emerging digital skills before they join.

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 improves performance for modern workloads

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8 can provide significant performance improvements over RHEL 7 across a range of modern workloads. To put this in context, we used RHEL 7.6 to execute multiple benchmarks with Intel's 2nd generation of Intel Xeon Scalable processors, and our hardware partners set 35 new world record performance results using the same OS version. This post will highlight RHEL 8 performance gains over RHEL 7.

    How did we get here? The performance engineering team at Red Hat collaborates with software partners and hardware OEMs to measure and optimize performance across workloads that range from high-end databases, NoSQL databases packaged in RHEL, Java applications, and third party databases and applications from Oracle, Microsoft SQL Server, SAS, and SAP HANA ERP applications.

    We run multiple benchmarks and measure the performance of CPU, memory, disk I/O and networking. Testing includes the filesystems we ship with Red Hat Enterprise Linux, such as XFS, Ext4, GFS2, Gluster and Ceph.

  • Federation V2 is now KubeFed

    Some time ago we talked about how Federation V2 on Red Hat OpenShift 3.11 enables users to spread their applications and services across multiple locales or clusters. As a fast moving project, lots of changes happened since our last blog post. Among those changes, Federation V2 has been renamed to KubeFed and we have released OpenShift 4.

    In today’s blog post we are going to look at KubeFed from an OpenShift 4 perspective, as well as show you a stateful demo application deployed across multiple clusters connected with KubeFed.

    There are still some unknowns around KubeFed; specifically in storage and networking. We are evaluating different solutions because we want to we deliver a top-notch product to manage your clusters across multiple regions/clouds in a clear and user-friendly way. Stay tuned for more information to come!

  • Duplicity 0.8.01

    Duplicity 0.8.01 is now in rawhide. The big change here is that it now uses Python 3. I’ve tested it in my own environment, both on it’s own and with deja-dup, and both work.

    Please test and file bugs. I expect there will be more, but with Python 2 reaching EOL soon, it’s important to move everything we can to Python 3.

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Security: FOSS Updates, WhatsApp and Telegram, Windows as Malware and Respect to Fernando Corbató

Tor, 07/16/2019 - 06:30
  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (firefox), Debian (libspring-java, ruby-mini-magick, and thunderbird), Fedora (fossil, python-django, snapd-glib, and thunderbird), openSUSE (helm and monitoring-plugins), Red Hat (cyrus-imapd, thunderbird, and vim), Scientific Linux (vim), Slackware (bzip2), SUSE (bubblewrap, bzip2, expat, glib2, kernel, php7, python3, and tomcat), and Ubuntu (exiv2, firefox, and flightcrew).

  • WhatsApp, Telegram Vulnerable To ‘Media File Jacking’: Change Your Settings Now!

    Instant messaging apps like WhatsApp and Telegram keep your messages encrypted in transit, but once a media file reaches your phone, the same cannot be guaranteed.

    Researchers from Symantec have demonstrated how a vulnerability in WhatsApp and Telegram can be exploited by hackers to hijack the media files that are sent through these services.

  • Windows 7 & security-only telemetry - What gives?

    Sometimes, it is hard to separate fact from emotion when it comes to technology. This does not help the end user, because when people come searching for solutions to genuine concerns like this, they first have to filter through outbursts of pent-up frustration as a result of many years of salesy bullshit.

    From the technological point of view, there's nothing new here. However, the fact you now get non-security nonsense with security means you can't really trust updates from Microsoft anymore. So if anything, this will majestically backfire. People don't like being pushed, and I'm amazed with the repeated attempts to do so, again and again.

  • Fernando Corbató, Early Operating System Pioneer And Password Inventor, Dies At 93

    Corbató and his fellow researchers at MIT made possible much of what we now think of as computing.

  • Professor Emeritus Fernando Corbató, MIT computing pioneer, dies at 93

    Longtime MIT professor developed early “time-sharing” operating systems and is widely credited as the creator of the world's first computer password.

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AMD's Linux Graphics Driver Patches

Tor, 07/16/2019 - 06:15
  • AMD resolves Destiny 2, Linux crashes via AGESA update

    AMD has confirmed that a bug causing Destiny 2 and selected Linux distributions to fail to run on its latest Zen 2-based Ryzen 3000 series processors will need a microcode update to resolve - but claims it has distributed the necessary code to its motherboard partners already.

    AMD's third-generation Ryzen processors, based on the company's Zen 2 microarchitecture, are undeniably impressive - but users of some software packages have been reporting incompatibility issues. For gamers, the headline was Destiny 2 refusing to run when running on any system with a Ryzen 3000 series processor installed; for Linux users, an incompatibility between the chips and selected versions of the systemd init system and related software suite. In both cases, the issue was the same: a complete inability to use the software without reverting to older hardware.

  • AMD Sends Out Linux Graphics Driver Patches For "Arcturus" As New Vega Derived GPU

    Remember last September when that AMD Arcturus codename dropped in our forums for what at first appeared to be a successor to Navi but later clarified to be used as a Linux driver enablement codename? Well, the Linux kernel driver patches for this "Arcturus" GPU have just been posted.

    This Radeon Arcturus support comes just a few weeks after the Radeon RX 5000 "Navi" Linux driver support was posted. But indeed this "Arcturus" part isn't based on Navi but rather a new swing on Vega based on Vega 20 in part. And we haven't heard of "Arcturus" at any recent AMD events nor from leaks on the more Windows focused sites.

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Linux kernel announces a patch to allow 0.0.0.0/8 as a valid address range

Tor, 07/16/2019 - 06:13

Last month, the team behind Linux kernel announced a patch that allows 0.0.0.0/8 as a valid address range. This patch allows for these 16m new IPv4 addresses to appear within a box or on the wire. The aim is to use this 0/8 as a global unicast as this address was never used except the 0.0.0.0.

In a post written by Dave Taht, Director of the Make-Wifi-Fast, and committed by David Stephen Miller, an American software developer working on the Linux kernel mentions that the use of 0.0.0.0/8 has been prohibited since the early internet due to two issues.

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Coming up in Linux 5.3: ASUS TUF Gaming Laptop Support, Speed Select Technology (SST)

Tor, 07/16/2019 - 05:50
  • Linux 5.3's ASUS WMI Driver Add ASUS TUF Gaming Laptop Support & More

    The x86 platform driver updates were sent in and already merged for the ongoing Linux 5.3 kernel. It's the x86 platform driver updates that bring the recently mentioned Intel Speed Select Technology for Linux driver but there is also more.

    Beyond the interesting Intel Speed Select support, the ASUS WMI driver has gone through a refactoring in order to support ASUS' TUF Gaming laptops. In the process, there's even been a regression fix for once popular Eee PC laptop models where their backlight were stuck permanently off.

  • Intel Speed Select Technology Comes To Linux With The 5.3 Kernel

    With the in-development Linux 5.3 kernel is now support for Intel Speed Select Technology (SST) that was introduced as part of Cascade Lake processors. Speed Select Technology allows optimizing the system with per-core performance configurations to prioritize certain workloads while lowering the performance envelope for other cores.

    With the Linux 5.3 kernel there is now an Intel Speed Select Technology driver with these granular power/performance controls. With Cascade Lake and newer, these power and performance profiles can be configured from the OS and done dynamically based upon the real-time needs.

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Canonical/Ubuntu: ASUS, Weekly Newsletter and Octave Snaps

Tor, 07/16/2019 - 05:44
  • ASUS ROG CROSSHAIR VIII HERO Testing On Ubuntu 18.04 Linux

    For those in the market for an AMD X570 high-end motherboard for use with the new Zen 2 processors, the ASUS ROG CROSSHAIR VIII HERO was one of the boards sent out as part of the reviewer's kit and it's been working out quite well.

    The ASUS ROG CROSSHAIR VIII HERO is quite feature packed with dual M.2 drives, USB 3.2 Gen2, active chipset heatsink, 2.5 Gbps Ethernet and Gigabit Ethernet (requires kernel patches for the 2.5G controller), and plenty of other connectivity. This motherboard does cost a pretty penny though at around $380 USD.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 587
  • Latest Gnu Octave Available to Install via Snap in Ubuntu

    Gnu Octave finally offers official Snap package for Linux desktops, so far in beta, which means you can now easily install the latest Octave via Ubuntu Software and always keep updated.

    Octave snap is a containerized software package comes with run-time libraries bundled and auto-updates itself once a new version package is published.

  • Octave turns to snaps to reduce dependency on Linux distribution maintainers

    Octave is a numerical computing environment largely compatible with MATLAB. As free software, Octave runs on GNU/Linux, macOS, BSD, and Windows. At the 2019 Snapcraft Summit, Mike Miller and Jordi Gutiérrez Hermoso of the Octave team worked on creating an Octave snap in stable and beta versions for the Snap Store.

    As Mike and Jordi explained, “Octave is currently packaged for most of the major distributions, but sometimes it’s older than we would like.” The goal of the Octave snap was to allow users to easily access the current stable release of the software, independently of Linux distribution release cycles. A snap would also let them release Octave on distributions not covered so far.

    Before starting with snaps, Octave depended on distribution maintainers, including those of CentOS, Debian, Fedora, and Ubuntu, for its binary packaging. With snaps, the situation has improved. The Octave team can now push out a release as soon as it ready for users eager to get it now, while other more conservative users wait for more traditional packages from their distribution. Mike and Jordi envisioned this to be the biggest benefit of coming to the Summit and creating an Octave snap.

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Epic Games Awards Open Source 3D Creation Tool Blender With $1.2 Million

Tor, 07/16/2019 - 05:35

While Epic Games has been in a number of articles and video regarding their practices in the gaming space, it’s nice to see a positive spin for the company. Today, Epic Games has announced that they have donated $1.2 million in cash towards the Blender Project. A free and open source creation tool that is used by a number of developers, which allows them to create 3D graphics animation and even entire games.

This award is part of the Epic MegaGrants Initiative which Epic Games has committed $100 million. This program was created to help game developers, students, professionals, and creators. By providing funding, the Epic MegaGrants goal is to help foster a positive gaming and creative landscape.

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Feren OS 19.07

Tor, 07/16/2019 - 05:32

Today we are looking at Feren OS 19.07. It is based on Linux Mint 19.1, so indirectly Ubuntu 18.04, which is supported until April 2023. It comes with Cinnamon and Nemo 4.0 and Linux Kernel 4.15. It uses about 1GB of ram when idling.

Feren Os is a highly customized version of Linux Mint, which is semi-rolling, it is as rolling as a Ubuntu LTS distro can be, yet it is a very stable and reliable, as well as beautiful and by each release just getting better and better.

Direct/video: Feren OS 19.07 Run Through

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Audiocasts/Shows: Open Source Security Podcast, Full Circle Weekly News and This Week in Linux

Tor, 07/16/2019 - 02:33
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 154 - Chat with the authors of the book "The Fifth Domain"

    Josh and Kurt talk to the authors of a new book The Fifth Domain. Dick Clarke and Rob Knake join us to discuss the book, cybersecurity, US policy, how we got where we are today and what the future holds for cybersecurity.

  • Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Weekly News #139
  • Episode 74 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, AMD releases BIOS fix for the Linux booting issue, IBM closes on the landmark acquisition of Red Hat, and Ubuntu announces that Ubuntu LTS users will be getting the latest nvidia drivers much more easily. In App News, Mozilla releases Firefox 68 and Mozilla responds to some weird news around an organization calling them an “Internet Villain”. Also in App News, we’ll take a look at some news regarding GNOME Software possibly dropping support for Snaps, and new releases from Syncthing (Dropbox replacement) & Kdenlive (video editor). Later in the show we’ll check out some Hardware News for the new Pi-top 4 and do some follow ups on topics we discussed in previous episodes including one topic where I need to make a correction to a mistake I made regarding IDE in the 5.2 Linux kernel. Then we’ll round out the show with some Linux Gaming news! All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

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Cheat.sh Shows Cheat Sheets On The Command Line Or In Your Code Editor

Tor, 07/16/2019 - 02:30

cheat.sh provides access to community-driven cheat sheets and snippets for Linux/UNIX commands and many programming languages, using various interfaces.

It can be used in a web browser, from the command line (using curl, or its dedicated command line client for Linux or Windows), and as a plugin for Vim, Emacs, Visual Studio Code, Sublime Text and IntelliJ Idea, so you can search and insert a code snippet without leaving the code editor / the command line.

For its cheat sheets, the tool makes use of community-driven sources like TLDR pages, Learn X in Y minutes, StackOverflow and others, as well as its own repository.

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OSI and Linux Foundation: Takeover by Proprietary Software Giants With Back Doors

Tor, 07/16/2019 - 02:26
  • Thierry Carrez: Open source in 2019, Part 3/3

    As mentioned in part 2, since open source was coined in 1998, software companies have evolved ways to retain control while producing open source software, and in that process stripped users of some of the traditional benefits associated with F/OSS. But those companies were still abiding to the terms of the open source licenses, giving users a clear base set of freedoms and rights.
    Over the past year, a number of those companies have decided that they wanted even more control, in particular control of any revenue associated with the open source software. They proposed new licenses, removing established freedoms and rights in order to be able to assert that level of control. The open source definition defines those minimal freedoms and rights that any open source software should have, so the Open Source Initiative (OSI), as steadfast guardians of that definition, rightfully resisted those attempts.
    Those companies quickly switched to attacking OSI's legitimacy, pitching "Open Source" more as a broad category than a clear set of freedoms and rights. And they created new licenses, with deceptive naming ("community", "commons", "public"...) in an effort to blur the lines and retain some of the open source definition aura for their now-proprietary software.
    The solution is not in redefining open source, or claiming it's no longer relevant. Open source is not a business model, or a constantly evolving way to produce software. It is a base set of user freedoms and rights expressed in the license the software is published under. Like all standards, its value resides in its permanence.

  • Juniper Networks Extends Commitment to Open Source Software and Communities through Open Source Initiative Sponsorship.

    The Open Source Initiative ® (OSI), the founding organization of the Open Source Software movement and steward of the Open Source Definition, announced today corporate sponsorship by Juniper Networks, the longstanding proponent of open source software and open standards, and industry leader in automated, scalable, and secure networks. Juniper Networks firmly believes open source and open standards foster greater innovation, and for years has actively participated in a variety of open source communities and key standards bodies, including FreeBSD Foundation, Linux Foundation, Cloud Native Computing Foundation, and OpenStack Foundation. In addition to their support of open source foundations, the networking company has released or contributed to many free and open source projects such as OpenStack, Ansible, Salt, PyEZ, wistar, OpenNTI, Tungsten Fabric, along with dozens of others.

  • Microsoft, Salesforce and the Ethereum Foundation Join Open-source Hyperledger Blockchain Project [Ed: Microsoft gives more money to Jim Zemlin and his PAC/foundation]

    Microsoft’s involvement in blockchain goes back several years as they have been building out capabilities in Azure for organizations requiring blockchain-as-a-service capabilities. These investments include Project Bletchley, R3/Corda/Quorum protocol support and Microsoft-Truffle partnership to name a few.

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Tizonia – powerful open source cloud music player for the Linux terminal

Tor, 07/16/2019 - 02:23

The Linux platform has matured into an excellent way of listening to streaming music services. There are clients available for most of the popular music streaming services. But what if you want a single app that covers the very popular ones without straying away from the Linux terminal. Step forward Tizonia.

Tizonia offers access to some excellent streaming music services — all from the command line. The software supports popular services such as YouTube, Spotify, Google Play Music, SoundCloud, Chromecast, and more.

Tizonia is innovative software. It doesn’t use FFmpeg, libav, gstreamer or libvlc for playback. Instead, the software’s multimedia framework is based on OpenMAX IL 1.2. OpenMAX (Open Media Acceleration) is a non-proprietary and royalty-free cross-platform set of C-language programming interfaces. It provides abstractions for routines that are especially useful for processing of audio, video, and still images.

Tizonia is C/C++ software which integrates online services with Python connectors/proxies. This means it should be fairly easy to integrate new services, assuming a Python-based API is accessible.

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What Is AppImage in Linux?

Tor, 07/16/2019 - 02:21

On a Linux distro, you should always install new software with the aid of your package manager when possible. It keeps things clean, and all files are tracked by the manager and can be easily removed later. This also helps avoid potential trouble when you later upgrade your distribution. But since your distribution might not have the software you need, or some might be too old, you sometimes have to resort to alternatives. Out of all these alternatives, though, only choose to download third party “.deb” or “.rpm” files as a last resort.

What Is AppImage?

On Windows, you can download a ZIP archive, extract the contents to a directory, and run the application within, without having to install it. This is called a portable app because you can copy it to a USB stick and then run it on any computer that uses the Windows operating system.

An AppImage, though technically constructed in a different way, works the same from the user’s perspective. You download one file and run the program on your Linux operating system without having to install anything. Furthermore, you can also copy this on a USB stick, and it will run on Debian, Ubuntu, Arch Linux, openSUSE, Fedora, or any other Linux distribution.

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5 Business Tools for Start-ups Running on Linux in 2019

Tor, 07/16/2019 - 02:07

There is no denying that Linux offers more flexibility and security than Microsoft Windows. However, if you use a Linux system for your business, then there is no need to compromise on productivity. The following are some of the most amazing business tools for Linux OS that you can use to enhance business operations and reduce costs:

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D9VK 0.13f

Tor, 07/16/2019 - 01:54
  • D9VK for translating D3D9 to Vulkan for Wine has another new version out, 0.13f - "Hypnofrog"

    Developer Joshua Ashton is certainly keeping busy, with another brand new release of D9VK now available.

    As a reminder: D9VK is based on DXVK. While DXVK focuses on translating D3D11 and D3D10 into Vulkan for use in Wine, D9VK focuses on D3D9. Eventually, they should hopefully merge into one awesome project.

    Version 0.13f - "Hypnofrog" is coming in less than a week after the last release, yet still manages to sound interesting given that's not a lot of time. There's some "New General API Stuff", "New Fixed Function Support", "New Shader Support" and bug fixes for "D3D9" and "DXSO (Shader Fixes)".

    Most of the changelog is highly technical language for those of you who understand graphics APIs. The main takeaway, as always, is that each new release should bring more compatibility with Windows games in Wine that use DirectX 9. Since D9VK uses Vulkan, it should perform better than vanilla Wine.

  • D9VK 0.13f Brings Extra Features For Direct3D 9 Over Vulkan

    It was just earlier this month that D9VK 0.13 was released with new features while now a "0.13f" Hypnofrog release is available in pre-release form.

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LXD 3.15 has been released

Tor, 07/16/2019 - 01:48

The LXD team is very excited to announce the release of LXD 3.15!

This release both includes a number of major new features as well as some significant internal rework of various parts of LXD.

One big highlight is the transition to the dqlite 1.0 branch which will bring us more performance and reliability, both for our cluster users and for standalone installations. This rework moves a lot of the low-level database/replication logic to dedicated C libraries and significantly reduces the amount of back and forth going on between C and Go.

On the networking front, this release features a lot of improvements, adding support for IPv4/IPv6 filtering on bridges, MAC and VLAN filtering on SR-IOV devices and much improved DHCP server management.

We’re also debuting a new version of our resources API which will now provide details on network devices and storage disks on top of extending our existing CPU, memory and GPU reporting.

And that’s all before looking into the many other performance improvements, smaller features and bugfixes that went into this release.

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