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If You Are a Linux User, Make Your Next PC Powered By AMD

Tor, 07/16/2019 - 01:41

While I was searching for a new on-budget laptop to buy, especially after my Lenovo Thinkpad x260 almost died, I did a lot of research specifically about what CPU & GPU vendors to choose, mainly because I use Linux only and I was worried about some rumors of compatibility and other issues.

At the end I chose AMD, and I bought a laptop powered by AMD. My experience with it on Linux has been wonderful so far. This is my story, and why I think that you should go with AMD for your next PC too.

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Octa-core MediaTek i700 SoC offers APU 2.0 for edge AI

Pon, 07/15/2019 - 20:13

MediaTek unveiled an “AI IoT platform i700” SoC for edge AI with 2x 2.2GHz Cortex-A75 cores and 6x 2.0GHz -A55 cores plus a PowerVR GM9446, a 970MHz ISP, and a MediaTek APU 2.0 for AI acceleration.

MediaTek recently announced a powerful octa-core Arm that is intended not for smartphones but for edge AI systems. The AI IoT platform i700 is designed for applications including facial recognition in retail payment authentication, access control for smart buildings, or as a visual-sensor platform for autonomous vehicles in factories and warehousing. Other possibilities are said to include obstacle detection systems in automated forklifts and 3D human pose detection for augmented reality fitness coaching applications.

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Quad-camera rig taps into Jetson AGX Xavier for deep learning

Pon, 07/15/2019 - 17:38

E-con has launched a Linux-driven, AI-enabled “SurveilsQUAD” camera system for the Nvidia Jetson AGX Xavier or TX2 with 4x 2-megapixel cameras with HD or FHD resolution connected via MIPI-CSI-2.

E-con Systems has begun shipping a SurveilsQUAD (e-CAM20_CUXVR) camera system with a V4L2 Linux driver and a sample Linux app with source. Like the robotics focused e-CAM130_CUXVR kit it launched in January, the SurveilsQUAD has four 4-lane MIPI-CSI-2 connected cameras and is designed to work with the Linux-powered Nvidia Jetson AGX Xavier Development Kit.

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Annual Report 2018: LibreOffice development

Pon, 07/15/2019 - 17:33

Throughout the second half of 2018, the developer community worked on a new major release: LibreOffice 6.2. Details about the end-user-facing new features are provided on this page, and in the following video – so in the rest of this blog post, we’ll focus on developer-related changes.

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Programming Leftovers

Pon, 07/15/2019 - 17:28

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Linux Kernel: Chrome OS, Direct Rendering Manger (DRM) and Char/Misc

Pon, 07/15/2019 - 17:24
  • Various Chrome OS Hardware Support Improvements Make It Into Linux 5.3 Mainline

    Various Chrome OS hardware platform support improvements have made it into the Linux 5.3 kernel for those after running other Linux distributions on Chromebooks and the like as well as reducing Google's maintenance burden with traditionally carrying so much material out-of-tree.

  • The Massive DRM Pull Request With AMDGPU Navi Support Sent In For Linux 5.3

    At 479,818 lines of new code and just 36,145 lines of code removed while touching nearly two thousand files, the Direct Rendering Manger (DRM) driver updates for Linux 5.3 are huge. But a big portion of that line count is the addition of AMD Radeon RX 5000 "Navi" support and a good portion of that in turn being auto-generated header files. Navi support is ready for the mainline Linux kernel!

  • Char/Misc Has A Bit Of Changes All Over For Linux 5.3

    The char/misc changes with each succeeding kernel release seem to have less changes to the character device subsystem itself and more just a random collection of changes not fitting in other subsystems / pull requests. With Linux 5.3 comes another smothering of different changes.

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today's howtos

Pon, 07/15/2019 - 17:10

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Spectre Mitigation Performance Impact Benchmarks On AMD Ryzen 3700X / 3900X Against Intel

Pon, 07/15/2019 - 16:41

AMD Zen 2 processors feature hardware-based mitigations for Spectre V2 and Spectre V4 SSBD while remaining immune to the likes of Meltdown and Zombieload. Here are some benchmarks looking at toggling the CPU speculative execution mitigations across various Intel and AMD processors.

For this round of testing are some mitigation comparison tests on the Core i7 8700K, Core i9 9900K, Core i9 7960X, Ryzen 7 2700X, Ryzen 9 2950X, Ryzen 9 2990WX, Ryzen 7 3700X, and Ryzen 9 3900X. On each processor, the tests were done when booting the Linux 5.2 kernel with the default/out-of-the-box mitigations for Spectre/Meltdown/Foreshadow/Zombieload (all CPU speculative execution mitigations to date) and then again when making use of the "mitigations=off" kernel parameter for disabling these run-time-toggleable mitigations. Basically the tests are the equivalent of mitigations=off vs. mitigations=auto (default) comparison.

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Q4OS 3.8 Centaurus, stable

Pon, 07/15/2019 - 16:39

We are proud to announce the immediate availability of the brand new stable Q4OS 3.8 version, codenamed 'Centaurus'. This is a long-term support LTS release, to be supported for at least five years with security patches and software updates.

The primary Q4OS aim is stability. As we want to provide as stable as possible operating system for companies as well as for individuals, once installed and configured, Q4OS will work reliably in a long standing way, getting security fixes and updates. Adopting a new feature into the core system could be committed in a highly exceptional cases only. We treat such possible cases as best as possible, doing testing and investigating consequences carefully before such a change.

Q4OS Centaurus is based on Debian Buster 10 and Plasma 5.14, optionally Trinity 14.0.6, desktop environment, and it's available for 64bit and 32bit/i686pae computers, as well as for older i386 systems without PAE extension. We are working hard to bring it for ARM devices too.

Also: Q4OS 3.8 Released As A Traditional Desktop Linux Distribution Built Atop Debian 10.0

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I2Som PanGu, an STM32MP1 powered Raspberry Pi Linux alternative that costs ~US$72.50

Pon, 07/15/2019 - 16:30

The 105.5 x 70 mm SBC is based on the STMicroelectronics STM32MP1, a dual-core MPU that integrates two ARM Cortex A7 cores, along with a Cortex M4 chip. I2Som has included 512 MB RAM too, which it complements with 4 GB of eMMC flash storage. You could expand upon this with a microSD card though, should 4 GB not be enough for your needs.

The PanGu also has several USB ports, HDMI, a parallel port and a MIPI DSI. Moreover, the board has a 3.5 mm stereo headphone jack, an 80-pin board-to-board connector and a 30-pin 2.0 mm pin with support for ADC, CAN, FMC, GPIO, I2C, SDIO, SPI, TIM, UART and USB. The PanGu has an Ethernet port too.

The board runs Debian Jesse and Yocto Linux, with Stephen Vicinanza of CNX Software stressing that it offers features that are "lighter, more robust and have the developer in mind with multilanguage capabilities" than other comparable SBCs. I2Som has a wiki for the board, although this is currently only available in Chinese. You can order the PanGu from Taobao for 499 RMB (~US$72.50).

Also: Solectrix SX Mobile Device Kit Runs Linux or Android on NXP i.MX8M Mini Processor

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Best Linux Distro for Windows 7 Refugees: Manjaro KDE

Pon, 07/15/2019 - 16:21

Manjaro is based off of Arch Linux, but I like to describe it to people as the “Ubuntu of Arch” for its user-friendly design choices and its particular attention to helping new Linux users to learn what they are doing. Another great perk of the Arch foundation underneath Manjaro is the use of the Arch Linux Wiki.

The Arch wiki is easily one of the largest resources of help, information, and know-how for all Linux users— regardless of distribution, many of the articles found can be applied.

Back in the spring of 2017 I wrote a series of articles discussing various Desktop Environments for Linux systems, such as Cinnamon and KDE just to name a couple, and overall for Windows users who have decided to take the plunge, I’m recommending KDE.

Regardless of distribution, KDE is filled with eye candy, is highly-customizable, one of the most powerful file-browsers available (Dolphin), and is deeply documented with a long-standing history (KDE was created in 1996).

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Games: Epic Games, Taste of Power, RetroArch, Space Rabbits in Space, CoreCtrl, NOTES, Streets of Rogue, Code This Game's Author

Pon, 07/15/2019 - 15:59
  • Epic Games' Tim Sweeney talks Linux and gaming some more, says Linux is "great"

    Tim Sweeney, the Founder and CEO of Epic Games took to Twitter again recently to answer some questions about Linux and gaming.

    Why? Well, it seems the previously incorrect reports about Easy Anti-Cheat dropping Linux support like to reappear and people end up spreading it around. Even though it has since been clarified, people still end up spreading it.

  • Real-time strategy game "Taste of Power" leaving Early Access next month with Linux support

    Taste of Power, a real-time strategy game from developer OneOcean is gearing up for a full release on August 27th. It's been in Early Access now for around seven months, so hopefully they've managed to polish it up.

  • RetroArch, the front-end app for emulators and more is heading to Steam

    RetroArch, a popular front-end application for running emulators, game engines and much more is now officially coming to Steam.

    This FOSS application is pretty popular, along with the Libretro API enabling you to get a rather pretty-looking PS3-styled interface to deal with all sorts, although as I understand most just use it for emulators.

  • The Linux version of "Space Rabbits in Space" now appears to be live

    Space Rabbits in Space, a 2d parkour skill-based platformer has now officially released for Linux on Steam. Developed by Ventilator Shark, a small independent game studio based in Zagreb, Croatia.

    A game I mentioned back in February, after speaking to the developer they did confirm it was coming they just didn't know exactly when. With no announcement I can find, the Linux version went live a few days ago!

  • CoreCtrl, a new FOSS Linux tool to help you control your PC with application profiles

    Quite an interesting one this, CoreCtrl from developer Juan Palacios aims to be a "game changer" in letting you setup your hardware to do things automatically when a program is launched and more. The developer tagged us on Twitter about it and it does seem pretty sweet.

  • NOTES, a small puzzle game based on connecting musical notes

    Here's a sweet recent release for fans of small puzzle games. Miro Jankura recently released NOTES on Steam and looks like a nice relaxing puzzler.

    It released only recently, on July 11th with same-day Linux support. While it's based on musical notes, the developer does say no musical knowledge is required.

  • The developer of Streets of Rogue recently commented about supporting Linux

    With Streets of Rogue having left Early Access recently, I'm sure plenty were wondering how it's done on Linux. Turns out the developer, Matt Dabrowski, actually made some interesting comments about it.

    Curiously, the comment from Dabrowski turned up at a place I didn't quite expect. A dubious website offering free download links to various games, where it seems Dabrowski turned up to warn people away from it and instead try the older version on itch.io to get a feel for it.

  • Mike Driscoll: PyDev of the Week: Meg Ray

    This week we welcome Meg Ray (@teach_python) as our PyDev of the Week! Meg teaches programming to other teachers and has developed Python-related curriculum. Meg is also the author of Code This Game, a book which will be coming out in August 2019. Let’s take some time to get to know her better!

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today's leftovers

Pon, 07/15/2019 - 09:33
  • A Modern Open Source Project Management Platform

    Project management is a discipline that has been through many incarnations, spawning an entire industry of businesses and tools. The challenge is to build a platform that is sufficiently powerful and adaptable to fit the workflow of your teams, while remaining opinionated enough to be useful. It also helps to have an open and extensible platform that can be customized as needed. In this episode Pablo Ruiz Múzquiz explains the motivation for creating the open source tool Taiga, how it compares to the other options in the market, and how you can use it for your own projects. He also discusses the challenges inherent to project management tools, his philosophies on what makes a project successful, and how to manage your team workflows to be most effective. It was helpful learning from Pablo's long experience in the software industry and managing teams of various sizes.

  • GNU World Order 13x29
  • RetroArch Emulation Platform Is Coming To Steam On July 30

    There will be no difference in the functionality of the RetroArch when it launches on Steam in two weeks from now. The Steam version will not have Steamworks SDK functionality or additional Steam features at the time of the launch.

    After the launch, the company will explore options to incorporate Steam’s functionality into the emulator platform.

    Moreover, the open source company has said that it will initially launch the Windows version. macOS and Linux versions will be released later.

  • Linux Weekly Roundup #34

    Hello and welcome to this week's Linux Roundup.  Thank you so much for your time.

    We had another good week of Linux Releases.

    Sparky Linux 4.11, Linux Mint 19.2 Beta (well kind of, please read below how their release process works), Feren OS 19.07 and Feren OS Next Beta has been released.

    Other distros I have been looking at this week is Clear Linux with Gnome 3.32 and Artix Linux 20190609.

    About the Linux Mint release method, when all the development is done, the ISO is being tested by a Linux Mint team and Clem, the main guy of Linux Mint will approve all the ISOs when he feels they are ready, when all of the ISOs are approved, the ISOs are being pushed into all the Linux Mint Download Mirrors, after all the mirrors are being updated, Linux Mint writes their release notes.  
    We are currently at the point where all the ISOs has been approved and already being pushed into the Download Mirrors.

  • Porfirio A. Páiz - porfiriopaiz: repos

    Rawhide is the name given to the current development version of Fedora. It consists of a package repository called "rawhide" and contains the latest build of all Fedora packages updated on a daily basis. Each day, an attempt is made to create a full set of 'deliverables' (installation images and so on), and all that compose successfully are included in the Rawhide tree for that day.

    It is possible to install its repository files and just temporarily enable it for just a single transaction, let us say, to simple install or upgrade a single package and its dependencies, maybe, to give a try to its new version that is not currently available on any of the stable and maintained versions of Fedora.

    This is useful when a bug was fixed on Rawhide but it has not landed yet on the stable branch of Fedora and the urge for it cannot wait.

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Kernel, LF and Graphics

Pon, 07/15/2019 - 09:31
  • Linux's UBIFS File-System Picks Up Support For Zstd Compression

    The UBIFS file-system for usage on un-managed flash memory devices now has support for Zstd compression.

    Zstd file-system compression was added to UBIFS as providing a means of being faster than the existing LZO compression, including for embedded Arm hardware, while still offering a good compression rate. This new UBIFS Zstd compression can be enabled via the UBIFS_FS_ZSTD Kconfig switch for building the UBIFS module with this Zstd support.

  • EdgeX Foundry’s Edinburgh release provides framework for IoT

    The internet of things gets a lot of flak for its fragmentation, but attempts are being made to rectify the situation. Case in point: The EdgeX Foundry on Thursday announced the availability of its Edinburgh release, created for IoT use cases across vertical markets.

    It’s not going to completely eliminate fragmentation—that would be an impractical challenge to mount. But whereas a few years ago everybody was trying to do edge and IoT implementations in a proprietary manner, “I would say open source is ready for prime time from an edge perspective,” said Arpit Joshipura, general manager, Networking, Edge and IoT with the Linux Foundation, in an interview.

  • Vulkan 1.1.115 Released With Another Batch Of Corrections

    Vulkan has been sticking to its weekly release regiment this summer. While recent weekly updates have introduced new Vulkan extensions, with today's Vulkan 1.1.115 release there are not any new extensions in tow.

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Software: KDE and GNOME Applications, Proprietary Software

Pon, 07/15/2019 - 09:28
  • Kate LSP Client Continued

    The new LSP client by Mark Nauwelaerts made nice progress since the LSP client restart post last week.

    [...]

    Both are aimed to improve the support of the Rust LSP server. As you can see, they got already reviewed and merged.

  • Pitivi Video Editor Gets Better Thanks to Google Summer of Code

    The Pitivi video editor is getting some (arguably overdue) love and attention as part of this year’s Google Summer of Code (GSoC).

    New features, interface adjustments, and improved clip editing are among the changes the open-source non-linear video editing app is in line to pick up.

    Two recent updates from GSoC 2019 students reveal a bit more about the enhancements that are underway.

    Millan Castro reports on his ‘first month working in Pitivi‘. His goal: ‘implement an interval time system”.

  • Microsoft Office 365: Banned in German schools over privacy fears
  • FreeOffice July Update Adds MS Office 2019 Support, Classic Interface Option

    A major update to FreeOffice by SoftMaker, a gratis set of productivity apps modelled after Microsoft Office, is now available to download.

    Dubbed the “anniversary update”, the latest version of this office suite intros compatibility with the latest Microsoft Office file formats.

    All three apps in the family, TextMaker, PlanMaker and Presentations, are said to be fully compatible with the latest Microsoft Office file formats, allowing users to open, edit and save in native Office formats like .docx.

    The suite now lets users choose an interface layout, with the standard “Ribbon” interface mode and a more traditional menu-based UI available.

  • Microsoft Office Clone ‘SoftMaker Office 2018’ Sees Summer Update

    Do keep in mind that SoftMaker Office 2018 is not free software so you will need to buy a subscription or make a one-off purchase to use it longterm.

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OSS Leftovers

Pon, 07/15/2019 - 09:23
  • CBA discloses NetBank's open source components

    One update explained that NetBank had started to make use of Google Safetynet, a service billed as “a set of services and APIs that help protect your app against security threats, including device tampering, bad URLs, potentially harmful apps, and fake users.”

    “The Google Safetynet feature does not involve CommBank sharing data with Google, but rather, the Android device shares some data with Google in order to provide an assessment of the device security, which we then use to detect certain types of fraud and cybercrime," a CBA spokesperson told iTnews.

    The second update to NetBank added open source licences, which the bank's spokesperson said was “a decision to acknowledge the use of third party components within our apps, where appropriate”.

    The spokesperson added that “this transparency, if anything, benefits security.”

    “We take security seriously,” the spokesperson added.

    “Every version of the CommBank app, including the open source components, is rigorously scrutinised and scanned by our engineering and cyber security teams for any potential vulnerabilities, and to ensure it is safe to use."

  • InAccel releases open-source Logistic Regression IP core for FPGAs

    Machine learning algorithms are extremely computationally intensive and time consuming when they must be trained on large amounts of data. Typical processors are not optimized for machine learning applications and therefore offer limited performance. Therefore, both academia an industry is focused on the development of specialized architectures for the efficient acceleration of machine learning applications.

  • Eradani Bridges The Gap Between Legacy And Open Source

    In this publication, legacy is not a dirty word or even remotely pejorative. Rather, “legacy” is just a shorthand way of delineating between applications that encapsulate decades of the evolution of a business and the transactions it processes, and all of the other new stuff that this business is also doing and perhaps coding with newer tools and programming languages.

    A new company, called Eradani, has been founded by some experts in both the IBM i world and the open source world with the express purpose of building a technical bridge so these two different cultures can see a unified, hybrid system without knowing all of the details of both sides of that system. This is a lot easier than having heated arguments about how things should be done or whose software stack is better or worse.

    Eradani, which is named after the sun around which the planet Vulcan orbits in the Star Trek science fiction series and which is actually a constellation in the southern hemisphere with several stars bearing that name (but spelled Eridani), was founded by Dan Magid, who was most recently in charge of the modernization labs and sales specialists teams at Rocket Software. Magid came to Rocket Software back in 2011, when that software conglomerate acquired software change management tool maker Aldon Software, where Magid was its long-time chief executive officer. Aldon was co-founded by Albert Magid, his father, and Don Parr back in 1979 in the wake of the System/38 launch, so the Magid family has deep, deep roots in the IBM i world. (Aldon had previously sold itself to private equity firm in 2007.)

  • Open source plays leading role in getting driverless cars on the road

    pen source is playing an increasingly important role in the race to develop fully-functional, totally driverless cars capable of handling all traffic conditions – and investors are lining up to support these efforts.

    Last week, Japan-based open source company Tier IV announced it had raised a further $100 million to facilitate commercialisation of self-driving technology for what it called `private, depopulated and urban’ areas. This brings the amount of money investors have pumped into the company to around $230million.

    However, Tier IV, which was spun out of Japan’s Nagoya University by Shinpei Kato and which counts Yamaha Motor Corporation among its backers, is not the only open source company in the self-driving vehicle starting line-up.

  • AV Mapping Startup Carmera Joins Baidu's Open-Source Apollo Platform

    The company also maintains Baidu Apollo, an open-source software platform launched in 2017 that allows software developers, researchers, and the company’s 130 enterprise partners, including Nvidia (NASDAQ: NVDA), Ford (NYSE: F), Velodyne Lidar, and Toyota (NYSE: TM), to build their own AV systems. The Apollo technology stack has more than 12,000 GitHub developers, and earlier this month, Baidu released Apollo 5.0, the latest version. Other mobility players maintain open-source development platforms—Nvidia, for example—but they aren’t as comprehensive as Apollo.

  • NEC Embraces Open Source Frameworks for SX-Aurora Vector Computing

    In this video from ISC 2019, Dr. Erich Focht from NEC Deutschland GmbH describes how the company is embracing open source frameworks for the SX-Aurora TSUBASA Vector Supercomputer.

    NEC recently opened the Vector Engine Data Acceleration Center (VEDAC) at its Silicon Valley facility. VEDAC is focused on fostering big data innovations using NEC’s emerging technologies while tapping into Silicon Valley’s rich ecosystem.

  • Four misconceptions about open source technology - Acquia

    Despite widespread adoption around the globe, open source technology continues to generate questions about its security and performance.

    Detractors question whether it’s a suitable basis for enterprise projects and platforms; their scepticism due, in no small part, to a series of myths and misconceptions which surround the technology.

    In an era in which cyber-crime and hacking attacks are so frequent, they’ve ceased to be newsworthy, some of these concerns spring from a genuine fear that open source means open to all comers.

    Others have their roots in inertia and the deep comfort of the familiar. Many IT managers would prefer to stick with the tried and true – proprietary technologies whose performance is known and for which they’re happy to be accountable, rather than the unknown quantity which is open source.

  • Google Releases Open Source Cryptographic Tool

    Google has made available an open-source cryptographic tool called Private Join and Compute. The tool uses secure multi-party computation (MPC) to augment the core PSI protocol.

    The product combines two cryptographic techniques - private set intersection and homomorphic encryption. Private set intersection is a technique that finds common identifiers in two sets of data without either data owner needing to show the other owner the underlying data. Google uses an oblivious variant which only marks encrypted identifiers without learning any of the identifiers.

  • Haiku monthly activity report - 06/2019

    We are now in beta phase, and besides the usual bugfixes, it's time to start investigating performance bottlenecks in Haiku. Waddlesplash has been hard at work in that area this month, starting with tuning of the newly integrated rpmalloc allocator.

    He also started benchmarking the uses of the allocator and found various opportunities to save memory, and use dedicated object caches instead of the generic malloc allocator, helping reduce memory fragmentation. The first patches have just started to land (in packagefs), there will likely be more. Ideally beta2 will be able to boot and install with 256MB of RAM or maybe even less thanks to this work.

    Meanwhile, waddlesplash is also auditing the code and starting to work towards making APIs more restricted (allowing some things only for the root user, for example), in order to provide some more privilege separation. Haiku has so far been largely a single user system, and did not worry too much about the usual attack vectors for an UNIX system. But modern computers are often online and we should try to keep our user's data reasonably safe. We have a long way to go, but we have to start with something.

  • Maintaining Independent Infrastructure

    One thing I end up embarassing myself about sometimes in the Ubuntu Podcast telegram chatter is that I end up buying and selling tiny amounts of shares on the US stock markets. All I can say is that I got spooked by the 35 day "government shutdown" at the start of the calendar year when I was stuck working without pay as a federal civil servant. Granted I did get back pay but the Human Capital Office at work is still fiddling with things even now in terms of getting payroll records and other matters fixed. I generally buy shares in companies that pay dividends and then I take the dividends as cash. At work we refer to that as "unearned income" especially as it is taxed at a rate different from the one applied to my wages.

    My portfolio is somewhat weird. I am rather heavily invested in shipping whether it happens to be oil tankers or dry bulk cargo ships. In contrast I have almost nothing invested in technology companies. There aren't many "open source" companies available on the open stock market and the ones out there either I can't afford to buy a single share of or they violate my portfolio rule that stocks held must pay a divided of some sort. Too many companies in the computer tech world appear to make money but don't send any profits back to shareholders as their dividends are stuck at USD$0.00.

  • Mozilla figures out how users can avoid online ads and sites can still make money

    I've written for websites that depended on every single impression and click generated by viewers. Some viewers complained about ads and some stayed silent. However, the owner of the site knew that without those advertisements the site would go dark.

    And so, I go about my daily life without the help of ad blockers—assuming that, at some point in time, someone would come up with a way to make both sides of the coin happy.

    That time has finally come. And it should be of no surprise that those behind the solution are from within the open source community—specifically, Mozilla (which may or may not be in conjunction with a new venture, namely Scroll).

    How are they solving this little conundrum (that has perplexed the masses for years)? With a new service they're calling Ad-free Internet. Just what is this new service? It's as equally brilliant as it is simple (and surprising that no one else has realized this solution already).

  • Online Data Science Learning with Tech’s Biggest Names Through edX

    The main advantage of attending a prestigious name-brand data science certification program is the reputation of that esteemed organization that it carries with it. Other than providing tech students and rookies with better opportunities to find an entry-level job at that company (such as Microsoft), it’s a great badge for the more experienced professionals as well.

    However, there are several high-level courses available, such as the ones through edX at IBM, Microsoft, MIT, UC San Diego and Harvard. Each one is different, and tailored to fit the needs of a variety of different professionals at many levels. In this article, we will take a look at these different programs, summarize their most important characteristics, the skills you’re going to acquire (as well as those you need before taking the course), and why you should choose one of them over another.

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