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KDevelop 5.3

Sre, 11/14/2018 - 15:07
  • KDevelop 5.3 released

    A little less than a year after the release of KDevelop 5.2 and a little more than 20 years after KDevelop's first official release, we are happy to announce the availability of KDevelop 5.3 today. Below is a summary of the significant changes.

    We plan to do a 5.3.1 stabilization release soon, should any major issues show up.

  • KDevelop 5.3 Released With Better C++, Python & PHP Support

    KDevelop 5.3 brings the Clazy analyzer that makes use of Clang, many improvements to C++ support, a whole lot of PHP language support improvements, and the Python language support has seen some fixes as well as the ability to inject environment profile variables into the debug process environment. KDevelop 5.3 has also seen improvements for its support on BSD, Haiku, and other operating systems.

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Security Leftovers

Sre, 11/14/2018 - 11:01

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Servers Leftovers (Mostly OpenStack-Related)

Sre, 11/14/2018 - 10:58
  • OpenStack Expands With New Projects, Canonical’s CEO Is Not Thrilled About It

    For those who have been paying attention (and SDxCentral has been), the OpenStack Foundation has been expanding its scope beyond the basic compute, storage, and networking sub-projects of its cloud infrastructure software. Today at the OpenStack Summit in Berlin the group made it official, announcing that it will host new open source projects with a new governance framework.

    The OpenStack Foundation board approved the governance framework to incubate new pilot projects that are relevant to the open infrastructure community. As part of this new framework, the first four pilot projects are Kata Containers, Airship, Zuul, and StarlingX. All of these projects have been previously announced.

  • Open source is growing up – and here’s how

    If you’re among those who still think that open source is just for hobbyists and academics, think again. Open source is mature now, both as a concept and as tools for building enterprise IT, and we have two major shifts in understanding to thank for that.

    The first key change is that there’s a much more mature understanding now of how the layers of IT architecture relate to each other – of what fits where, in other words. Instead of trying to do too much, adding in every feature or capability that might be related, open source projects have become more focused.

    For example, instead of misunderstanding them as rivals, we can now see OpenStack and Kubernetes for what they are. The former is an infrastructure layer, upon which you can run platform layers such as the latter.

  • Open-source and cloud-native, Kubernetes paves the way for new companies to bring DevOps to data

    With less than two months left, 2018 is poised to go down in tech history as the coming of age for open-source software.

    Need evidence? Over the past 10 months, notable open-source enterprises MuleSoft Inc., Magento Inc., GitHub Inc. and Red Hat Inc. have been purchased for a combined $50 billion.

    Yet before jumping on the open-source bandwagon, observers would be wise to keep in mind that these technologies still depend on a sizable community of contributors to keep innovation fresh, and monetization of many open-source projects remains a struggle. So what is all the fuss about?

  • Red Hat OpenStack Platform 14 coming soon with tighter Kubernetes integration

    Today, Red Hat has announced Red Hat OpenStack Platform 14, saying it will become available in the coming weeks. The firm says that the latest version, which is built on the OpenStack “Rocky” community release, more tightly integrates with the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform which gives admins full control over their Kubernetes environments.

  • Red Hat commits to Openstack for 'at least' 10 years

    While Red Hat understandably wouldn't discuss anything to do with the IBM mega-acquisition - for regulatory reasons - director of product management James Labocki and senior director for product management at Openstack Nick Barcet confirmed Red Hat's commitment to Openstack for at least the next "10 years".

    The open source giant today announced Openstack Platform 14, which Barcet said aimed to make Openstack a better platform to run container orchestration system Kubernetes on, while also helping to better manage the deployment of Red Hat's container platform OpenShift on bare metal, as well as easing the integration of OpenShift and Openstack at the networking and storage layer. This, says Barcet, is a landmark move for Red Hat because it is part of a new strategy to focus on its whole portfolio as a single entity rather than individual products.

  • Kaloom Collaborates with Red Hat to Deliver a Virtual Central Office Solution for Multivendor NFV Deployments

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Mozilla: How AV1 and Firefox Sync Were Made

Sre, 11/14/2018 - 10:54
  • Mozilla shares how AV1, the new the open source royalty-free video codec, works

    Last month, Nathan Egge, a Senior Research Engineer at Mozilla explained technical details behind AV1 in depth at the Mile High Video Workshop in Denver. AV1 is a new open source royalty-free video codec that promises to help companies and individuals transmit high-quality video over the internet efficiently.

    AV1 is developed by the Alliance for Open Media (AOMedia), an association of firms from the semiconductor industry, video on demand providers, and web browser developers, founded in 2015. Mozilla joined AOMedia as a founding member.

    AV1 was created for a broad set of industry use cases such as video on demand/streaming, video conferencing, screen sharing, video game streaming, and broadcast. It is widely supported and adopted and gives at least 30% better than current generation video codecs.

  • Private by Design: How we built Firefox Sync

    Firefox Sync lets you share your bookmarks, browsing history, passwords and other browser data between different devices, and send tabs from one device to another. It’s a feature that millions of our users take advantage of to streamline their lives and how they interact with the web.

    But on an Internet where sharing your data with a provider is the norm, we think it’s important to highlight the privacy aspects of Firefox Sync.

    Firefox Sync by default protects all your synced data so Mozilla can’t read it. We built Sync this way because we put user privacy first. In this post, we take a closer look at some of the technical design choices we made and why.

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Linux Foundation: Ceph and OPNFV Gambia

Sre, 11/14/2018 - 10:29
  • The Ceph Foundation has been launched by the Linux Foundation to support the open source storage project

    At Ceph Day Berlin, yesterday (November 12) the Linux Foundation announced the launch of the Ceph Foundation. A total of 31 organizations have come together to launch the Ceph Foundation including industries like ARM, Intel, Harvard and many more. The foundation aims to bring industry members together to support the Ceph open source community.

    [...]

    The Ceph Foundation will provide an open, collaborative, and neutral home for project stakeholders to coordinate their development and community investments in the Ceph ecosystem.

  • Linux Foundation Launches Open Source Ceph Storage Group

    Open source storage gets a boost today as the Linux Foundation launches the Ceph Foundation with more than 30 members including China Mobile, DigitalOcean, Intel, OVH, and Red Hat.

    The Ceph project is a unified distributed storage system providing applications with object, block, and file system interfaces. It was co-founded more than a decade ago by Sage Weil, who is now chief architect at Red Hat for Ceph, and University of California, Santa Cruz professor Carlos Maltzahn. A whole team of storage engineers now manage and maintain the open source code.

  • OPNFV Gambia — Doing what we do best while advancing cloud native

    Today, the OPNFV community is pleased to announce the availability of Gambia, our seventh platform release! I am extremely proud of the way the community rallied together to make this happen and provide the industry with another integrated reference platform for accelerating their NFV deployments.

    At a high level, Gambia represents our first step towards continuous delivery (CD) and deepens our work in cloud native, while also advancing our core capabilities in testing and integration, and the development of carrier-grade features by working upstream. As an open source pioneer in NFV, it’s amazing to see the evolution of the project to meet the needs of a quickly changing technology landscape.

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Linux-Ready Devices With Intel (Back Door/ME) Chips

Sre, 11/14/2018 - 10:23
  • Rugged, low-cost Bay Trail SBC runs Linux

    VersaLogic released a rugged, PC/104-Plus form-factor “SandCat” SBC with a dual-core Intel Bay Trail SoC, -40 to 85℃ support, plus SATA, GbE, and mini-PCIe and more, starting at $370 in volume.

    VersaLogic has spun a simpler, more affordable alternative to its BayCat single board computer, which similarly offers a Linux supported Intel Bay Trail SoC in a PC/104-Plus form-factor board. The rugged new SandCat is limited to a dual-core, 1.33GHz Atom E3825, and offers a somewhat reduced feature set, but launches at less than half the price of the dual-core version of the BayCat, selling at $370 in volume.

  • Rugged DIN-rail PC taps Skylake-U

    Aaeon has launched a Linux-friendly DIN-rail “Boxer-6750” DIN-rail computer with a dual-core Intel 6th Gen CPU, dual displays, extended temp and vibration resistance, plus 2x GbE, 2x USB 3.0, and 4x serial ports.

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Server: HelpSystems Gets Into JAMS for Scheduling, Red Hat's Reality of OpenStack, and Impact of IBM-Red Hat Merger

Sre, 11/14/2018 - 10:18
  • HelpSystems Gets Into JAMS for Scheduling

    HelpSystems yesterday announced the acquisition of MVP Systems Software, the Connecticut-based developer of the JAMS workload management and scheduling software. While JAMS supported IBM i, HelpSystems will count on the product to deliver capabilities primarily in the open systems realm, with cloud possibilities looming in the future.

    The acquisition came together as the result of mutual respect that HelpSystems and MVP Systems Software had for each other, says Kate Bolseth, general manager of cross platform products at HelpSystems.

  • What's the reality of OpenStack and public cloud?

    My colleague, Margaret Dawson, spends a lot of time talking with customers. And in those conversations, questions about cloud and OpenStack invariably come up. She shared this message a while back, during her keynote at the OpenStack Summit in Vancouver, and it still resonates. While public cloud looms large in many companies’ plans, OpenStack’s future looks bright in the hybrid cloud reality we see today -- and tomorrow.

    “Most of you, especially if you’ve been working on OpenStack for a while, hear ‘Game’s over. Why are we even still doing this? AWS has won, so let’s just put everything in the public cloud and call it a day.”

  • Impact of IBM-Red Hat Merger

    Recently, there have been numerous machine learning, and AI algorithms developed to achieve the desired output in a dynamic, efficient, and effective manner. However, in a real-time scenario, an individual algorithm has its own advantages and is restricted to certain limitations. These limitations can be minimized by integrating different algorithms to achieve the desired task. By capturing the insights into the integral approach, IBM has announced its acquisition of Red Hat technologies to enhance its cloud-based business services to its clients.

    In the past year, nearly a quarter of IBM overall revenue was achieved through the cloud service platform. But with an increase in competitors, the company was overshadowed by other cloud rivals such as Microsoft and Amazon. Ginni Rometty, CEO of IBM, stated that at present, only 20 percent of the companies are renting cloud services to cut costs; over 80 percent are still unlocking their business values and can shift their business applications to the hybrid cloud in the near future for data extraction and optimization.

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Debian Packages To Eliminate Vendor-Specific Patches, Affecting Downstreams Like Ubuntu

Sre, 11/14/2018 - 10:04

Debian packages have supported the concept of vendor-specific patches whereby when DPKG unpacks a source package on different operating systems / distributions (such as Debian vs. Ubuntu), different patches could be selectively applied. Ubuntu is one of the main benefactors of this feature while effective immediately these vendor-specific patches to source packages will be treated as a bug and will be unpermitted following the Debian 10 "Buster" release.

This vendor-specific patch behavior for DPKG is mainly to help downstreams of Debian such as Ubuntu (not to be confused with vendor-specific hardware patches, etc). This vendor-specific patching has been used where say Ubuntu wishes to make some customizations to a Debian package that are minor in nature or basic alterations, they could land the changes in upstream Debian as a vendor-specific patch that would then be applied to the source package when building on Ubuntu... But keeping the package unpatched on Debian, or vice-versa. It reduces the maintenance burden for those wanting to selectively make basic changes to a package without having to maintain multiple largely redundant packages.

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Ubuntu Founder Mark Shuttleworth Has No Plans Of Selling Canonical

Sre, 11/14/2018 - 09:57

A couple of weeks ago IBM announced its plan to buy Red Hat for $34 billion. Following that, experts started speculating that rival companies like Canonical and Suse would sell as well.

However, Canonical’s founder, Mark Shuttleworth, doesn’t seem to have any plans of selling the company — at least not in the near future. In an encounter with TechCrunch, he said, “I value my independence.”

One of the reasons behind this decision is that he doesn’t really need the money. But another big reason for not selling is his vision for Canonical and Ubuntu, which he would like to see through personally.

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A Journey on Budgie Desktop #2: Raven

Sre, 11/14/2018 - 09:50

Raven, the Super+A menu, is the special right panel on Budgie Desktop Environment. It's represented by a white door icon with a left arrow on it beside the power icon on the top panel. It's interesting as it's fun to show/hide in end-user's perspective. It's unique, compared to same right-side panel concepts on BlankOn and deepin, it has own name Raven while being very minimal yet usable. See more below. This is the continuation after the first part talked about the Top Panel. Enjoy and please wait the next part about Applets!

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Ubuntu 19.04 Development Starts Off With Python 3.7, Merged Usr Directories

Sre, 11/14/2018 - 09:03

Ubuntu 19.04 "Disco Dingo" development is now officially underway.

Following the initial sync from Debian unstable, Ubuntu developer Matthias Klose announced this morning that "Disco Dingo is now open for development."

The initial prominent changes in the archive include landing Python 3.7 as the default Python3 version after Ubuntu 18.10 shipped with Python 3.6, removal of OpenSSL 1.0 with intending to only ship OpenSSL 1.1.1 LTS, and upgrading to Perl 5.28.

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New in Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Sre, 11/14/2018 - 08:59
  • PHP 7.2, Node.js 10, NGINX 1.14 and others now GA for RHEL

    These versions are available on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 (Devtools or RHSCL channel) for x86_64, s390x, aarch64, and ppc64le. Read more details about each component in the “New Components details” section.

  • GCC 8.2 now GA for Red Hat Enterprise Linux

    We are pleased to announce general availability of Red Hat Developer Toolset 8 beta for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7.

    [...]

    Like other tools, these are installable via yum from the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 or 7 Devtools or RHSCL channel. For more details, see the “New Features” section below.

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Google Shows Off New Android Dev Tools

Sre, 11/14/2018 - 08:40

After years of teasing and speculation, it finally looks as though foldable screen smartphones are headed to market. Google's dev announcement followed closely on the heels of Samsung's announcement at its own developer conference of a folding phone/tablet prototype with Infinity Flex Display.

The Android tools will take advantage of the new display technology, which literally bends and folds, noted Stephanie Cuthbertson, director of product management at Google. The technology is based on two variations of screen design: two-screen devices and one-screen devices.

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More Empty Promises From Microsoft

Sre, 11/14/2018 - 08:31

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Games: Crusader Kings II: Holy Fury, Humble Dystopian Bundle, Steam Play, DreamHack Atlanta 2018 and Wine

Sre, 11/14/2018 - 07:14
  • Crusader Kings II: Holy Fury smites its way to release, some thoughts

    Dealing with all things related to faith and righteous violence, the latest expansion to the venerable medieval strategy title has spiced things up considerably.

  • The Humble Dystopian Bundle is out with some nice Linux games included

    For those of you after some fresh games, The Humble Dystopian Bundle is out and it includes a couple good Linux titles.

    For the PWYW (Pay what you want) tier you will get Beholder and Orwell: Keeping an Eye On You. If you pay more than the current average then Orwell: Ignorance is Strength is yours.

  • Valve has expanded the Steam Play whitelist to include DARK SOULS III and plenty more

    There I am, in bed about to fall asleep when my phone lights up as I forgot to put it on silent. Thankfully so, as it turns out Valve just expanded the Steam Play whitelist and that's always a bit exciting.

    What is the whitelist? These are titles that Valve are confident enough that work out of the box with no additional configuration required. You don't need to turn any extra options on, they should just be click and play like any other Linux game on Steam.

  • Talk to us about open source gaming at DreamHack Atlanta 2018

    Red Hat is excited to sponsor our first esports event, DreamHack Atlanta on November 16-18, 2018. DreamHack is the world’s premier esports festival that celebrates the lifestyle of the gamer, and Red Hat will be there to sponsor a number of activities and provide a technical support booth for attendees who want to talk about gaming on open source platforms.

    Wait, Red Hat and esports? How do those go together?

    The majority of Internet infrastructure runs on Linux. The game servers, the streaming media servers, websites, and other infrastructure that powers online gaming? Much of that is powered by Linux. And Indie games are making a huge push to open source as well. We want to support that, because more open source is always a good thing!

  • Wine 3.0.4 Is En Route With New Icons, Dozens Of Bug Fixes

    Wine 4.0 should be out in early 2019 as the next major stable release of this increasingly used software for running Windows games and applications on Linux and other operating systems. For those not riding the bi-weekly development releases that lead up to the eventual Wine 4.0, Wine 3.0.4 is coming in the days ahead as the latest stable point revision.

    Wine stable point releases tend to be focused just on maintenance/bug/regression fixes, but Wine 3.0.4 will be a bit visibly different in that many Shell32 icons are added to this update. Dozens of Shell32 icons from the Zip and Jaz drive icons to 314k floppy drive icons to the start menu are bundled in Wine 3.0.4.

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The Best Linux Distros For Beginners

Sre, 11/14/2018 - 06:42

Everyone needs to start somewhere, and Linux is no different. Even though it became a meme, telling newcomers to install Gentoo isn’t very productive, and it harms the community as a whole.

There are distributions that work to make themselves accessible to people of every skill level and technical aptitude. They’re often called "Beginner distributions", but they aren’t just for beginners. Actually, any one of these choices would be great for everyone, but they’re also the best places for newbies to start.

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Security: Updates, Protecting the Digital Supply Chain, and Steam DRM Failure

Sre, 11/14/2018 - 06:28
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Protecting the Digital Supply Chain

    You first learn about the importance of the supply chain as a child. You discover a shiny object on the ground and as you reach down to pick it up your parent says “Don’t touch that! You don’t know where it’s been!” But why does it matter whether you know where it’s been? When your parents know where something came from, they can trust that it’s clean and safe for you to play with. When they don’t, their imagination runs wild with all of the disgusting bacteria and viruses that might taint it.

    The food supply chain is important. Food is sealed not just so that it will keep longer, but also so that you can trust that no one has tampered with it between the time it left the supplier to the time it goes in your grocery bag. Some food goes even further and provides a tamper-evident seal that makes it obvious if someone else opened it before you. Again, the concern isn’t just about food freshness, or even someone stealing food from a package, it’s about the supplier protecting you from a malicious person who might go as far as poisoning the food.

    The supply chain ultimately comes down to trust and your ability to audit that trust. You trust the grocery and the supplier to protect the food you buy, but you still check the expiry date and whether it’s been opened before you buy it. The grocery then trusts and audits their suppliers and so on down the line until you get to a farm that produces the raw materials that go into your food. Of course it doesn’t stop there. In the case of organic farming, the farmer is also audited for the processes they use to fertilize and remove pests in their crops, and in the case of livestock this even extends to the supply chain behind the food the livestock eats.

  • I found a security hole in Steam that gave me every game's license keys and all I got was this... oh nice: $20,000

    A bloke has told how he discovered a bug in Valve's Steam marketplace that could have been exploited by thieves to steal game license keys and play pirated titles.

    Researcher Artem Moskowsky told The Register earlier this week that he stumbled across the vulnerability – which earned him a $20,000 bug bounty for reporting it – by accident while looking over the Steam partner portal. That's the site developers use to manage the games they make available for download from Steam.

  • Hacker Receives $20,000 From Valve For Discovering Steam Bug That Generates Free Steam Keys

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