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FSF gives freedom-respecting videoconferencing to all associate members

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  • FSF gives freedom-respecting videoconferencing to all associate members

    The Free Software Foundation (FSF) is now offering all FSF associate members free "as in freedom" videoconferencing as an additional member benefit. Becoming a member now helps you push back against increased societal pressure to use nonfree software to communicate with coworkers, friends, and loved ones during the COVID-19 pandemic, and after.

  • Free Software Foundation announces freedom-respecting videoconferencing for its associate members

    The Free Software Foundation (FSF) today announced free "as in freedom" videoconferencing for its associate members and their communities. This service will help everyone push back against increased societal pressure to use nonfree software to communicate with friends, collaborators, and loved ones during the COVID-19 pandemic, and after.

    The FSF has been raising the alarm about encroachments upon freedom by remote communication tools since social distancing guidelines were issued. The FSF's new videoconferencing service powered by free software comes after several of its recent publications warned users about widely used nonfree applications for remote communication and education, like Zoom.

    "The freedoms to associate and communicate are some of our most important. To have the means to exercise these freedoms online controlled by gatekeepers of despotic software is always dangerous and unacceptable, only more so when we can't safely gather in person," executive director John Sullivan explains. "We are a small nonprofit and can't provide hosting for the entire world, but we want to do our part. By offering feature-rich videoconferencing in freedom to our community of supporters, and sharing how others can do it, too, we demonstrate that it is possible to do this kind of communication in an ethical way."

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Strapi introduces new open-source headless content management system

Čet, 05/28/2020 - 21:08

Strapi, the company behind the most popular open-source headless content management system (CMS), has announced the general availability of its Community Edition after two years of development. The business also announced paid support plans and disclosed plans for an Enterprise Edition, which is already in private beta testing.

What's a headless CMS you ask? Unlike such popular CMSs as WordPress, Joomla, and Drupal, a headless CMS doesn't bother with the website's front-end. Instead, all its focus is on the back-end content repository, which is used for storing and delivering structured content. This content is then made available for display via a RESTful API, typically using JSON or XML.

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today's leftovers

Čet, 05/28/2020 - 19:34
  • A pandemic-era LWN update

    We are living through interesting times that present challenges in a number of areas, including running a business. While we think of LWN primarily as a community resource, it is also a business that is not unaffected by the ongoing pandemic. It is, we figure, a good time for a status update, especially since we have some news to share.
    Never has our 2002 decision to move to a subscription model looked like a better idea. Revenue from advertising has reached a level that is essentially indistinguishable from zero, with little sign that it will improve anytime soon. But we didn't depend on advertising because we work directly for our readers; as long as you all support us, we will be in good shape.

    Subscriptions have definitely fallen off a bit in the last few months, and we've had subscribers dropping off with a note saying that they had lost their job and needed to cut expenses. But the drop-off has not yet reached a point where we are seriously concerned about it; for that, we can only say "thank you!" to all of you for continuing to support us as the world gets weirder. A special thank-you is due to all of you subscribing at the Project Leader or Supporter levels; it really does make a difference.

    [...]

    Back in 1997 when work began on what eventually became LWN, we were driven by a strong sense of optimism about the future of Linux and free software. That optimism has been tested by ups and downs over time, but it has largely been borne out; Linux has been more successful than any of us could have imagined, and LWN is still here at the center of it. And we are still optimistic; we have managed to pull together an outstanding community of readers that will continue to support us for as long as we keep doing good work.

  • An Introduction to the K8s-Infrastructure Working Group

    When Kubernetes was formed in 2014, Google undertook the task of building and maintaining the infrastructure necessary for keeping the project running smoothly. The tools itself were open source, but the Google Cloud Platform project used to run the infrastructure was internal-only, preventing contributors from being able to help out. In August 2018, Google granted the Cloud Native Computing Foundation $9M in credits for the operation of Kubernetes. The sentiment behind this was that a project such as Kubernetes should be both maintained and operated by the community itself rather than by a single vendor.

    A group of community members enthusiastically undertook the task of collaborating on the path forward, realizing that there was a more formal infrastructure necessary. They joined together as a cross-team working group with ownership spanning across multiple Kubernetes SIGs (Architecture, Contributor Experience, Release, and Testing). Aaron Crickenberger worked with the Kubernetes Steering Committee to enable the formation of the working group, co-drafting a charter alongside long-time collaborator Davanum Srinivas, and by 2019 the working group was official.

  • EuroBSDCon 2020 is cancelled.

    It is with great disappointment that we were forced to conclude it is not possible to run the conference as usual. As such, there will be no EuroBSDCon 2020.

    There will be no virtual conference, as we feel we can’t provide much in that area not already provided by BSDCan.

    We hope to resume our conference next year, in Vienna. We will try to announce the relevant dates as soon as possible.

  • Design and Web team summary – 27 May 2020

    The web team here at Canonical run two-week iterations. Here are some of the highlights of our completed work from this iteration.

    [...]

    My name is Bartek (also known as bartaz around the interwebz). I live in Poznań in Poland and I’m a web developer. I’ve been a software developer for over 10 years now, working in front-end related technologies for most of this time. IE6 was still a thing when I started trying to make browsers display what I want them to, jQuery was not a thing yet, and nobody even dreamed of React.

    I joined Canonical four years ago as a front-end developer to work on snap store dashboard and after about a year I moved to the Web and Design Team, where I continued working on snap related projects such as snapcraft.io and build.snapcraft.io. A couple of months ago I moved to Vanilla squad where I develop and enhance our Vanilla framework.

  • OPPO Find X2, X2 Neo, X2 Lite, and Moto G7 Android 10 kernel source code now available

    The foundation of the Android OS is built on top of the Linux kernel, thus Android device makers are obliged to provide the source code (upon request) for any Linux kernel binaries that ship on their devices. Besides the source code release for the retail release software, OEMs should also publish the updated Linux kernel source code for any future software updates in order to comply with the GNU General Public License v2. Motorola, for example, is quite good at releasing Linux kernel source code for all the updates they roll out, and they have now published the kernel source code for the Moto G7’s Android 10 update. OPPO, on the other hand, has shared the initial kernel sources for a bunch of phones from the Find X2 lineup.

  • CTO Talk: Q&A with Seldon’s Clive Cox

    I’m more of a “meeting the Buddha on the road” kind of guy. However, influences along the way have been the usual suspects like Alan Turing and people such as Richard Stallman who promoted open source.

  • IAR Systems delivers embedded software building on Linux

    The build tools for Linux include the highly optimising IAR C/C++ Compiler, IAR Assembler, Linker and library tools, and runtime libraries. The tools are validated to run on the Ubuntu Linux distribution version 18.04.3 and later, and currently supports Arm and Renesas RH850.

  • IAR Systems Releases Embedded Software Building on Linux

    IAR Systems announced its portfolio of embedded development tools has been extended with build tools that support implementations in Linux-based frameworks.

  • Machine vision computer supports 5GBase-T cameras

    Imago’s Linux-ready “VisionBox AGE-X5” computer has an Intel 6th Gen CPU plus 2x 5GbE ports for driving new 5GBase-T cameras. Also onboard: 2x GigE, 4x USB 3.0, DIO, LED controllers, and camera triggers.

    In recent years we have seen a growing number of embedded boards and systems with 2.5GbE and 10GbE ports, but no 5GbE ports that we can recall. However, the networking standard is now ready for the spotlight with the arrival of 5-Gigabit Ethernet bandwidth 5GBase-T cameras from Teledyne Dalsa and Lucid Vision Labs. Imago, which sells a line of VisionBox machine vision systems including the Jetson TX2 based VisionBox Daytona, announced a new VisionBox AGE-X5 model that can be preconfigured with either 5GBase-T camera.

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Programming Leftovers

Čet, 05/28/2020 - 19:25
  • This Week in Rust 340
  • Simplify data visualization in Python with Plotly

    Plotly is a plotting ecosystem that allows you to make plots in Python, as well as JavaScript and R. In this series of articles, I'm focusing on plotting with Python libraries.

  • Perl Hacks, Perl School, and the future of Perl publishing

    Dave Cross, long-time Perl user, trainer, and author, recently released The Best of Perl Hacks, a curated collection of his best posts from his Perl Hacks blog. His imprint, Perl School, has published six e-books, including two that I wrote.

    There’s an unrelated book, Perl Hacks: Tips & Tools For Programming, Debugging, And Surviving, by chromatic, Damian Conway, and Curtis “Ovid” Poe. It’s also very good, but completely separate from Dave’s.

  • Qt for Automation changed to Qt M2M Protocols

    Qt M2M Protocols is now automatically included for free to every new Qt Device Creation subscription. The additional distribution license price has been removed as well.

    Qt Application Development license holders can buy Qt M2M Protocols separately.

  • Using Visual Studio Code for Qt Applications – Part Two

    In the last blog post we saw an essential, C++ oriented, Visual Studio Code setup. That was enough to get going right away, but we can still definitely do more and better. Here I’ll show you how to get a complete setup for your qmake and CMake projects, all this while also wearing a Qt hat (on top of my C++ hat) and having a deeper look at the Qt side.

    Build qmake Qt projects

    Qmake is not integrated with Visual Studio Code the way CMake is, so setting up a qmake project for build is slightly more convoluted than doing the same with CMake. This means we’ll have to define our own build tasks. We’re going to do this in two stages: build steps definition and build steps combination, leveraging the fact that Visual Studio Code implements task dependencies and ordered sequential execution of dependencies.

  • Where Did Software Go Wrong?

    Computers were supposed to be “a bicycle for our minds”, machines that operated faster than the speed of thought. And if the computer was a bicycle for the mind, then the plural form of computer, Internet, was a “new home of Mind.” The Internet was a fantastic assemblage of all the world’s knowledge, and it was a bastion of freedom that would make time, space, and geopolitics irrelevant. Ignorance, authoritarianism, and scarcity would be relics of the meatspace past.

    Things didn’t quite turn out that way. The magic disappeared and our optimism has since faded. Our websites are slow and insecure; our startups are creepy and unprofitable; our president Tweets hate speech; we don’t trust our social media apps, webcams, or voting machines. And in the era of coronavirus quarantining, we’re realizing just how inadequate the Internet turned out to be as a home of Mind. Where did it all go wrong?

  • good idea bad implementation crosstalk

    Unfortunately products like the latter seem quite common. Most things in my house are still rather dumb because regrettably few products are actually the same thing, but smarter. Instead smart devices are inevitably some inscrutable machine intelligence physically manifested in my house. So no thanks. Battle lines drawn, everybody pick a side, good idea or bad implementation, and fight!

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Ryzen 9 3900X/3950X vs. Core i9 10900K In 380+ Benchmarks

Čet, 05/28/2020 - 18:59

Following our initial Core i5 10600K and Core i9 10900K Linux benchmarks last week, here is a much larger comparison I have been working on since then in looking specifically at the Ryzen 9 3900X and 3950X against the Core i9 10900K. It's the largest to date with nearly 400 benchmarks being tested, most of them real-world test cases.

The past number of days I have been running this Core i9 10900K vs. Ryzen 9 3900X vs. Ryzen 9 3950X comparison with 381 benchmarks out of 138 distinct applications/workloads on both systems. With this round of benchmarking the Gigabyte Z490 AORUS MASTER and ASUS ROG CROSSHAIR VIII HERO were at play with 2 x 8GB DDR4-3600 Corsair memory, Samsung 970 EVO NVMe SSD, and Radeon RX 5700 XT graphics. Benchmarking was run off Ubuntu 20.04 LTS while upgrading to the Linux 5.7 Git kernel for the very latest kernel bits. All other Ubuntu 20.04 packages were at their respective defaults.

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Compact 8K video encoder runs Linux on Kaby Lake

Čet, 05/28/2020 - 18:55

Advantech has launched a “VEGA-8300E 8K Broadcast Video Encoder” and streaming appliance for 8Kp60, 10-bit 4:2:2 HEVC real-time encoding. The system runs Ubuntu on a 7th Gen Kaby Lake CPU and offers 2x hot-swappable SATA bays.

We realize that most of you are not in the market for an 8K video encoder, but we occasionally like to check in on the high-end video world where Linux is steadily making inroads. Normally Advantech’s VEGA-8300E 8K Broadcast Video Encoder would have been showcased at the NAB Show, which has been cancelled due to the pandemic. (Some NAB content is available on the online NAB Show Express.) We heard about the VEGA-8300E from an Advantech announcement on Businesswire that revealed the product has won a 2020 Best of Show Special Edition Award presented by TV Technology.

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Happy birthday Audacity: 20 years

Čet, 05/28/2020 - 18:45

Here is a next update for my ‘Digital Audio Workstation’ (DAW) software collection.

Today, 28th of May 2020, the Audacity multi-track audio recorder turns 20 years old! This is a nice moment to also release the Slackware packages (only targeting -current, sorry) for their latest and greatest, Audacity 2.4.1 which was released a week ago as a quick bug-fix to the long-awaited 2.4.0.

Along with this new Audacity release, I also have new packages for wxGTK3 (3.0.5.1) which you’ll need for Audacity to show its graphical user interface...

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What Makes a System76 Computer?

Čet, 05/28/2020 - 18:43

In homage to the revolutionary age of 1776, System76 revolutionizes open source technology and declares independence from our proprietary rulers. But what are the key ingredients that go into making a computer so revolutionary? The following delicious details outline the qualities we value in all of our computers. Note: Licking your screen is not an effective way to taste the deliciousness of this blog post.

System76 users depend on heavy computational power to get their work done, and in some cases require a literal heavy computer. Our hardware is designed to support top-line processors and graphics cards, allowing you to consistently plow through your workload. We’re not going to call on a sedan to do a bulldozer’s job.

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ZFS focus on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS: ZSys general principle on state management

Čet, 05/28/2020 - 18:39

After our previous general presentation of ZSys, it’s “”“time”“” to deep dive to one of its main predominant feature: state management!

A little technical detour first. as this question will necessarily arise, especially from those familiar with ZFS concepts.

We have purposively chosen the “state” terminology to prevent system administrators and in general, all those familiar with ZFS to confuse if with snapshot datasets.

Basically a state is a set of datasets, all frozen in time (apart from the current state), which regrouped together forms a system “state” that you can chose to reboot on.

Those group of datasets can be either made of snapshot datasets (read only) (which is what most of advanced ZFS users will expect), but it can also be filesystem datasets (read write), made of filesystem datasets clone of the current state datasets. You can boot to any of those.

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Apache Subversion 1.14.0

Čet, 05/28/2020 - 18:33

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KDE Applications, Wireshark, IceWM update in Tumbleweed

Čet, 05/28/2020 - 18:08

The last week has produced a total of three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots bringing the total amount of snapshots for the month to 18.

All 18 snapshots have recorded a stable rating above 91, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer. With 14 of them, recording a rating of 99 and the last two snapshots trending at a 99 rating.

The most recent 202000526 snapshot provided the 3.2.4 release of Wireshark. The new version fixed a Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures where it was possible to make Wireshark crash by injecting a malformed packet onto the wire or by convincing someone to read a malformed packet trace file. Linux Kernel 5.6.14 re-established support for RTL8401 chip version. DNS server and client utilities package bind 9.16.3 fixed to security problems and added engine support for OpenSSL Edwards-curve Digital Signature Algorithm implementation. Document viewer evince 3.36.1 updated translations, fixed an incorrect markup in the Czech User Interface and updated the French help image. SSL VPN client package openconnect 8.10 installed a bash completion script and fixed a potential buffer overflow with security communications library GnuTLS. GNOME’s 0.30.10 image organizer shotwell, which was the subject of a recently settled a patient lawsuit, modified web publishing authentication to comply with Google’s requirements.

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Raspberry Pi: Learning AI, Ad-Blocker, Open-Source Display Driver and Raspbian Renamed as Raspberry Pi OS

Čet, 05/28/2020 - 17:58
  • Learning AI at school — a peek into the black box
  • Turn Your Raspberry Pi into an Ad-Blocker

    While there are plenty of ad-blockers that can banish adverts from your laptop or computer, these rarely work on other devices, such as smartphones and tablets. This article will show you how to transform your Raspberry Pi into a network-wide ad blocker, using Pi-Hole. Once completed, you’ll be able to block ads across your laptop, computer, smartphone, tablet, and any other device that’s connected to your network.

  • BCM2711 / Raspberry Pi 4 Support Still Being Worked On For Open-Source Display Driver

    With the upcoming Linux 5.8 kernel merge window one of the features you still won't find in the mainline kernel is the VC4 DRM kernel driver supporting the Broadcom BCM2711 SoC and in turn the Raspberry Pi 4 open-source display support.

    Going back to February have been the VC4 DRM patches for the BCM2711 / Raspberry Pi 4. Sent out today is the third iteration of those patches albeit too late for seeing it hit DRM-Next in time for Linux 5.8.

  • Raspbian Renamed as Raspberry Pi OS, New 64-Bit Beta Available Now

    With the launch of the 8GB Raspberry Pi 4 computer, the Raspberry Pi Foundation also unveiled today the renaming of their Debian-based Raspbian Linux operating system as Raspberry Pi OS.

    Developed in-house by the Raspberry Fi Foundation as the primary operating system for the popular Raspberry Pi single-board computers, Raspbian is based on the well-known Debian GNU/Linux operating system and uses a modified LXDE desktop environment called PIXEL or simply the Raspberry Pi Desktop.

    In an attempt to make Raspbian more popular and bump its adoption amongst the ever-growing Raspberry Pi community, the Raspberry Pi Foundation has decided to change the name of their GNU/Linux distribution after more than five years to Raspberry Pi OS.

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Games: Northgard, Steam Cloud Gaming, Raspberry Pi 4, Drox Operative 2, Dungeons of Clay, Onsen Master

Čet, 05/28/2020 - 17:10
  • Viking strategy game Northgard gets a map editor, Steam Workshop support

    Northgard, the excellent real-time strategy game about warring viking tribes from Shiro Games just got another huge free update to expand what's possible with it.

    With the all-new Map Editor you can create, alter, and transform custom battlefields. Various parts of maps can be changed like placing resources, strategic structures, terrain elevation and more. It's a full built-in tool that's going to be a map makers dream for Northgard. Shiro said you can externally modify other parts of the game too like unit data and scripting to make entirely new parts like victory conditions. This also comes with Steam Workshop support for easy sharing and downloading.

  • Steam Cloud Gaming confirmed with Steam Cloud Play

    According to new Steam documents, Valve will be launching Steam Cloud Gaming soon with a Beta of Steam Cloud Play.

    It will require developers to opt in, and they're required to support Cloud Saves (or another online save method), otherwise gamers will lose their data. Developers will continue to be paid the same way, since users still need to buy the games on Steam.

    Before you get too excited though, the documents say the first service connecting with it will be NVIDIA GeForce NOW. For Linux gamers then, it means next to nothing since NVIDIA have been silent on any plans for Linux support with it. However, it's clearly early on and Valve are still building features and adding to their server capacity.

  • Build a Raspberry Pi 4 Retro-Gaming Console with RetroPie (Complete Guide)

    I love Linux, and I love retro-gaming, and in this video I show you how to create your very own retro-gaming console with RetroPie on the powerful new Raspberry Pi 4.

  • Drox Operative 2 gets an action-packed trailer

    Coming soon is Drox Operative 2 from Soldak Entertainment, a starship action RPG with warring alien races, fierce space battles, a dynamic, evolving galaxy.

    It was supposed to be releasing yesterday, May 27 but with delays to the Steam review process everything has been a bit delayed. On top of that, Soldak had their build rejected initially according to a blog post due to some minor issues that needing sorting. Drox Operative 2 might release this week, next week or later. Sometime soon, whenever Valve get to approvals again.

  • Dungeons of Clay has a wild style and a lot of action

    The latest game from ShotX Studio has been announced with Dungeons of Clay, an ever-changing action-platformer dungeon crawler and it looks great.

    Explore the ever-changing dungeons in the surreal world made of clay. Unlock the hidden secrets, overcome the dangers, defeat dreadful creatures and reap the treasures to acquire almighty power.

    [...]

    It's coming to Linux, just like their previous titles...

  • Onsen Master is a hot spring customer management game

    You've built cities, managed theme parks and run across kitchens to prepare dishes but have you managed a hot spring before? I sure haven't and Onsen Master looks and sounds amusing.

    With gameplay that seems to resemble the idea of Overcooked that looks like it could be a lot of fun, as you rush around to prepare ingredients to heal up your visitors across the fantasy island of Izajima. You're tasked with reconnecting "the communities that surround each onsen, and discover the supernatural world that they've long since been disconnected from".

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What Is Flatpak And How To Install Flatpak Apps On Ubuntu And Other Linux

Čet, 05/28/2020 - 12:22

Package management is one of the important features of any Linux distro that eases the method of Linux apps installation and maintenance. Different Linux distros follow different methods to package and distribute software.

But the same feature sometimes becomes a stumbling block for some people switching to different Linux distributions. They find it hard to understand the new package manager and fail to install the applications. To resolve such issues with multiple package managers, Linux distro has evolved to produce universal package management systems such as Snap, Appimage, and Flatpak.

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4 Linux distributions for gaming

Čet, 05/28/2020 - 12:05

Gaming on Linux got a thorough kickstart in 2013 when Valve announced that their own SteamOS would be written on top of Linux. Since then, Linux users could realistically expect to play high-grade games that, in the past, required the purchase of a Windows computer or gaming console. The experience got off to a modest start, with just a few brave companies like CD Projekt Red, Deep Silver, Valve itself, and others putting the Linux penguin icon in their compatibility list, but eventually, even Gearbox and Square Enix were releasing their biggest titles on Linux. Today, Valve's Proton project helps ensure that even titles with no formal Linux release still work on SteamOS and other Linux distributions.

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