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POP!_OS Delivers Outstanding GNOME Experience

Sre, 05/27/2020 - 22:32

System76 regularly updates this distro without requiring constant reinstallation. The developer updates POP!_OS on a rolling release cycle.

The operating system gets updates, security patches and updated releases as they are ready. Rolling releases ensure that you never have to handle ISO installations again with configuring settings to recreate the same look and feel of the current version.

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Librem 5 Timeline Recap

Sre, 05/27/2020 - 22:30

Now is a great time to say “Thank you” to all our supporters, as you will see from the timeline recap video, it takes an immense amount of dedication and support to accomplish great things.

Purism has since 2014 been dedicated to bringing the world new kinds of devices, in 2017 Purism started on the long journey of building a mobile phone hardware with accompanying software, this is the timeline of the Librem 5 journey. The Librem 5 has a built-in ecosystem that corrects the issues that have cropped up in other platforms. We want to build secure products that protect your digital privacy without you needing to change a single setting.

Keep in mind that hardware is hard, changing the world for the better is arduous, and that it takes an entire team of dedicated experts working with a supportive community who persevere through many obstacles to create innovative and unique products. This timeline attempts to enshrine both how difficult the challenge is to make a secure phone from scratch, write a mobile operating system that can run on a laptop, desktop, or mobile device. All of that while maintaining a firm idealistic approach to user freedom, privacy, and security.

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EPaper Tablet Gets Desktop Linux Install

Sre, 05/27/2020 - 19:53

ePaper is an interesting thing, providing a non-backlit viewing experience that is much more akin to reading a book than staring at a screen. The reMarkable tablet is a device designed around just such a display, and [davisr] has been hacking away at the platform. His latest work brings full-fat Linux to the fore.

The work builds upon [davisr]’s earlier work, installing a microSD slot in the tablet to make development easier. Getting Linux running required a custom kernel, but once sorted, working with the reMarkable is easy. apt is available for easy software installs, and the tablet is demonstrated using several different pieces of software, like mtPaint and Xournal.

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Why snap and flatpak are so important to Linux

Sre, 05/27/2020 - 19:44

The internet is a fickle beast. Just when you think a company or community of developers have come out with a bit of technology that could help an operating system or piece of software rise above, that wacky internet sneaks up to say, "Nay, nay!"

I remind myself over and over to not read the comment sections. But I do, and I see the flame wars that once threatened to slice and dice the heart of Linux rise back up. Once upon a time it was vi vs. emacs and GNOME vs. KDE.

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Stable Kernels: 5.6.15, 5.4.43, 4.19.125, 4.14.182, 4.9.225, and 4.4.225

Sre, 05/27/2020 - 19:40
  • Linux 5.6.15

    I'm announcing the release of the 5.6.15 kernel.

    All users of the 5.6 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 5.6.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.6.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 5.4.43
  • Linux 4.19.125
  • Linux 4.14.182
  • Linux 4.9.225
  • Linux 4.4.225

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Linux-powered wireless gateway supplies four surge-protected serial ports

Sre, 05/27/2020 - 17:25

Artila’s compact “IoT Gateway Matrix-704” runs Linux on a Microchip SAMA5D35 and provides GbE and Fast Ethernet, mini-PCIe and micro-SIM slots, a USB port, and 4x isolated, surge protected RS-485 ports.

Artila has introduced several of its Matrix IoT gateways with isolated serial ports, including the Matrix-710 and Matrix-713. Its new Matrix-704 can have its 4x RS-485 ports configured with optional isolation and it also comes standard with surge protection. The Matrix-704 has the same 536MHz, Cortex-A5 Microchip ATSAMA5D35 SoC as the more feature rich Matrix-710 and Matrix-713, as well as the recent Matrix-702, which lacks serial ports.

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today's leftovers

Sre, 05/27/2020 - 17:20
  • Linux Getting Fixed Up For Handling Pointing Sticks On Some Touchpads

    For input devices on some laptops that are a combination of a pointing stick and touchpad, the Linux kernel's multi-touch driver will finally begin handling them correctly.

    At least for Synaptics and Elan devices that offer a combination of a pointing stick and touchpad, the Linux kernel has been ignoring the input events from the pointing stick. But with Linux 5.8 that will change in properly handling the combo multi-touch devices via the hid-multitouch driver and this change is set to be back-ported as well to the various Linux kernel stable series being supported.

  • Mesa 20.1 Features Include Big Improvements For Open-Source Intel, Radeon Graphics Drivers

    The release of Mesa 20.1 is imminent as the latest quarterly feature update to this collection of open-source OpenGL/Vulkan drivers predominantly in use by Linux systems. Here is a look at the many exciting improvements with Mesa 20.1.

  • Hybrid cloud and multi-cloud: what is the difference?

    Hybrid cloud and multi-cloud are two exclusive terms that are often confused. While the hybrid cloud represents a model for extending private cloud infrastructure with one of the existing public clouds, a multi-cloud refers to an environment where multiple clouds are used at the same time, regardless of their type. Thus, while the hybrid cloud represents a very specific use case, multi-cloud is a more generic term and usually better reflects reality.

    Although both architectures are relatively simple to implement from the infrastructure point of view, the more important question is about workloads orchestration in such environments. In the following blog, I describe the differences between hybrid clouds and the multi-cloud and discuss the advantages of orchestrating workloads in a multi-cloud environment with Juju.

    [...]

    In turn, multi-cloud simply refers to using multiple clouds at the same time, regardless of their type. There is no dedicated infrastructure that facilitates it. There is no dedicated link, single IdM system, unified LMA stack or an integrated network. Just instead of a single cloud, an organisation uses at least two clouds at the same time.

    The goal behind the multi-cloud approach is to reduce the risk of relying on a single cloud service provider. Workloads can be distributed across multiple clouds which improves independence and helps to avoid ‘vendor lock-in’. Furthermore, as the multi-cloud is usually a geographically-distributed environment, this helps to improve high availability of applications and their resiliency against failures. Finally, the multi-cloud approach combines the best advantages of various cloud platforms. For example, running databases on virtual machines (VMs) while hosting frontend applications inside of containers. Thus, workload orchestration remains the most prominent challenge in this case.

  • Kubernetes for Data Science: meet Kubeflow

    Data science has exploded as a practice in the past decade and has become an undisputed driver of innovation.

    The forcing factors behind the rising interest in Machine Learning, a not so new concept, have consolidated and created an unparalleled capacity for Deep Learning, a subset of Artificial Neural Networks with many hidden layers, to thrive in the years to come.

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OSS Leftovers

Sre, 05/27/2020 - 17:16
  • Annual Report 2019: Native Language Projects – events around the world

    Canadian LibreOffice supporter Marc Paré set up LibreWaterloo, to “have a local presence on the Canadian scene with respect to the LibreOffice project and software. We would like to connect with local LibreOffice coders and users, and “to have fun” should be one of the pillars and principles we strive for.”

    He continues: “I spoke at a meeting of the KW Non-Profit Sys Admin (KWNPSA) where I am a co-coordinator, and I announced the creation of the new LibreWaterloo community group. There, I did a two hour presentation on the status of The Document Foundation, along with LibreOffice and the benefits of starting a group. There were approximately 15 people at the meeting, and a couple of people came to trouble-shoot their software; however, the meeting was not to trouble-shoot issues, but to discuss if there was an interest from the Sys Admin group.”

    Marc set up an organizing committee of three people to start with, and has plans for more events and localisation in Canada’s indigenous languages.

  • Mark Rotteveel and documentation team migrated the first documents to asciidoc
  • Open-Source and Closed-Source Monitoring Tools Compared (2020 Edition)

    Some benefits of using free and open-source software include decreased software costs, increased security and stability, protecting privacy, education, and giving users more control over their own hardware. Today, free and open-source software is everywhere. For instance, operating systems such as Linux and descendants of BSD are in widespread use and are powering millions of servers. Free-software licenses and open-source licenses are also used by many software packages. Furthermore, the free-software movement and the open-source software movement are online social movements that are accessory to the widespread adoption of free and open-source software.

  • India’s Aarogya Setu App Goes Open Source

    India has finally released the source code of its coronavirus tracking app, Aarogya Setu, on GitHub, nearly two months after its launch coupled with several privacy-related concerns.

  • Aarogya Setu goes open-source: What it means for the end user
  • Aarogya Setu becomes open source: What does it mean?

    As an answer to that today the government of India has made the Android version of the Aarogya Setu app open source, which means developers will be able to inspect the source code of the app and modify for changes. The source code of the Android version is already available for review and collaboration. All developers and researchers can visit this link to participate: https://github.com/nic-delhi/AarogyaSetu_Android.git

    The government has announced that the iOS version of the application will be released as open-source within the next two weeks and the server code will also be released subsequently. The government has also said that nearly 98 per cent users of Aarogya Setu app use an Android phone. The app is available for both iOS and Android users.

  • Government of India makes Aarogya Setu app open source; here is what it means

    Alderson isn’t the only one to have raised alarm over privacy issues in the Aarogya Setu app. New Delhi-based Software Freedom Law Centre has alleged that the app collects sensitive user data such as a user’s gender and travel history, The Internet Freedom Foundation (IFF) has also alleged that Aarogya Setu lacks transparency.

  • India’s contact tracing app is going open source [Ed: India gives Microsoft control over mass surveillance tool]

    The source code will be published on GitHub at midnight Tuesday.

  • Google Open-Sources AI for Using Tabular Data to Answer Natural Language Questions

    Google open-sourced Table Parser (TAPAS), a deep-learning system that can answer natural-language questions from tabular data. TAPAS was trained on 6.2 million tables extracted from Wikipedia and matches or exceeds state-of-the-art performance on several benchmarks.

    Co-creator Thomas Müller gave an overview of the work in a recent blog post. Given a table of numeric data, such as sports results or financial statistics, TAPAS is designed to answer natural-language questions about facts that can be inferred from the table; for example, given a list of sports championships, TAPAS might be able to answer "which team has won the most championships?" In contrast to previous solutions to this problem, which convert natural-language queries into software query languages such as SQL, which then run on the data table, TAPAS learns to operate directly on the data and outperforms the previous models on common question-answering benchmarks: by more than 12 points on Microsoft's Sequential Question Answering (SQA) and more than 4 points on Stanford's WikiTableQuestions (WTQ).

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Cinnamon 4.6 Arrives with Fractional Scaling, Nemo Improvements, and More

Sre, 05/27/2020 - 17:09

Announced earlier this year in January, the Cinnamon 4.6 desktop environment saw the light of day a couple of weeks ago. While there’s no official announcement for this major release, I did some digging to highlight the most important changes.

Probably the biggest new feature of Cinnamon 4.6 is support for fractional scaling on HiDPI/4K displays. The feature was finally implemented in the Display Settings panel under the Zoom Level drop-down.

Users will be able to choose values between 100% and 200%, such as 125%, 150%, 175%, for each of the connected monitors. Also in the Display Settings panel there’s now the ability to change the frequency of monitors.

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Open Source YouTube Alternative PeerTube Needs Your Support to Launch Version 3

Sre, 05/27/2020 - 17:01

PeerTube (developed by Framasoft) is a free and open-source decentralized alternative to YouTube somewhat like LBRY. As the name suggests, it relies on peer-to-peer connections to operate the video hosting services.

You can also choose to self-host your instance and also have access to videos from other instances (a federated network, just like Mastodon).

It is being actively developed for a few years now. And, to take it up a notch, they have decided to launch a crowdfunding campaign for the next major release.

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GNOME Devs Make Major Improvements to the Apps Grid

Sre, 05/27/2020 - 16:57

Since GNOME 3.38 is on house to ship in Ubuntu 20.10 (barring any tradition-flattening calamities …Which, given how things are going atm, is a distinct possibility) these are changes which you and I, as Ubuntu users, will likely benefit from come October.

So what’s cooking?

First up: the Applications screen drops the “Frequents” button that sira at the bottom of the grid. The apps grid is now just a single, vertically scrolling pane of application icons arranged in alphabetical order by default.

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GraalVM 20.1, OpenJ9 0.20, OpenJDK Java Benchmarks

Sre, 05/27/2020 - 16:54

Given the release last week of GraalVM 20.1 as well as last month's release of Eclipse OpenJ9 0.20, here are some fresh JVM benchmarks up against multiple OpenJDK releases.

For this fresh round of Linux benchmarking are numbers off the latest OpenJDK 8, OpenJDK 11, OpenJDK 14.0.1, OpenJDK 15 EA24, GraalVM 20.1 CE Java 8, GraalVM 20.1 CE Java 11, OpenJ9 0.20 Java 8, and OpenJ9 0.20 Java 11 for reference purposes. Note while Oracle made some OpenJDK 15 Java performance improvements stemming from our earlier testing, those changes don't appear to have been incorporated yet into OpenJDK 15 EA24. As usual, all of this testing was done with each configuration in its out-of-the-box/default settings.

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Licensing: Qt Online Installer 3.2.3 Released

Sre, 05/27/2020 - 16:53
  • Qt Online Installer 3.2.3 Released

    We are happy to announce Qt Online Installer / Maintenance Tool 3.2.3 has been released.

    We have fixed a few translation issues. Please read the details in ChangeLog.

    The page, introducing Qt Open Source usage, has been slightly modified. The goal has been to clarify the Qt Open Source usage.

  • Qt Updates Its Online Installer To Clarify Open-Source Obligations

    Following yesterday's release of Qt 5.15 LTS as the last series before Qt 6.0, The Qt Company has now released a new Qt Online Installer.

    Qt Online Installer 3.2.3 is out with a few translation fixes and they have reworked their "Qt Open Source usage" page. The page lays out the open-source usage obligations for the toolkit under the GPLv2/GPLv3/LGPLv3. The page also allows users to buy Qt or choose the right license and lays out the various obligations when using the open-source version.

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OpenSSH 8.3 released (and ssh-rsa deprecation notice)

Sre, 05/27/2020 - 16:51

OpenSSH 8.3 has just been released. It will be available from the mirrors listed at https://www.openssh.com/ shortly. OpenSSH is a 100% complete SSH protocol 2.0 implementation and includes sftp client and server support. Once again, we would like to thank the OpenSSH community for their continued support of the project, especially those who contributed code or patches, reported bugs, tested snapshots or donated to the project. More information on donations may be found at: https://www.openssh.com/donations.html

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The best Linux games

Sre, 05/27/2020 - 16:37

Although there has been a change in the gaming industry for several years, Windows is and remains the undisputed top dog among gaming operating systems. Nevertheless, more and more titles are available for Linux: With Steam, Ubuntu and GOG, users now have a decent game collection available . These include numerous free online games and iconic retro games.

The best place to go for Linux games is certainly the Steam platform . More than 13,000 games are currently available. In addition to numerous indie games, well-known AAA titles can also be found.

On the Ubuntu Software Center you can find free and paid Linux games . The focus is more on the category of arcade and board games. However, the key is in the store, because the Steam client can be downloaded there to access the well-known Steam games that are also available for Windows. To be able to use the center, however, you must create a user account. Alternatively, Steam Linux download is available from the Internet.

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Security and FUD

Sre, 05/27/2020 - 16:31
  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (sqlite3), Fedora (libarchive and netdata), openSUSE (dom4j, dovecot23, gcc9, and memcached), Red Hat (devtoolset-9-gcc, httpd24-httpd and httpd24-mod_md, ipmitool, kernel, kpatch-patch, openvswitch, openvswitch2.11, openvswitch2.13, rh-haproxy18-haproxy, and ruby), and SUSE (freetds, jasper, libxslt, and sysstat).

  • Patterns of Compromise: The EasyJet Data Breach

    It has been a withering time for the airlines, whose unused planes moulder in a gruelling waiting game of survival. The receivers are smacking their lips; administration has become a reality for many. Governments across the globe dispute what measures to ease in response to the coronavirus pandemic; travel has been largely suspended; and the hope is that some viable form will resume at some point soon.

  • Google Authenticator enables device-transfers, no back up/export options

    You’ve probably seen calls to “secure your account” with a second-factor authentication (2FA) app all over the web. Online services promote it as a way to improve the security of your online account. After you’ve enabled 2FA, you need to know your username and password as well as a one-time use token (a four–six digit code) generated by your 2FA app.

    When you enable 2FA with an online service, it “installs” a secret into your 2FA app — often by scanning a QR-variety matrix barcode. The client app can then generate a one-time use login token derived from the shared secret. You type in that token when you log in to the service. The service can generate its own token following the same process and compare the two login tokens. If a bad actor intercepts the token, it can only be used once and will be worthless in the future.

  • Smart cars vulnerable to hack that could enable 'remote control'
  • New fuzzing tool finds 26 USB bugs in Linux, Windows, macOS, and FreeBSD [Ed: It's clear that ZDNet is still hyping up and propping up this false narrative wherein Linux is worst at security and Microsoft has no back doors.]

    This allowed the research team to test USBFuzz not only on Linux, where most fuzzer programs work, but also other operating systems.

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Screencasts and Audiocasts: Redcore Linux 2004 KDE Run Through, LINUX Unplugged and Linux in the Ham Shack

Sre, 05/27/2020 - 16:28

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Red Hat and IBM: fabric8 Maven, Cheesy Marketing and Java/Quarkus

Sre, 05/27/2020 - 16:06
  • How the fabric8 Maven plug-in deploys Java applications to OpenShift

    The fabric8 Maven plug-in, often abbreviated FMP, can be added to a Maven Java project and takes care of the administrative tasks involved in deploying the application to a Red Hat OpenShift cluster.

  • EMEA: Asiakastieto Unlocks Open Banking Innovation with Red Hat
  • COVID-19, climate change, and the urgent need for innovation

    We are facing a time of unprecedented crisis. While the COVID-19 pandemic puts lives and livelihoods at immediate risk, climate change is an existential threat for humanity. Global challenges such as these are colossal tests of leadership and demand global answers. As the UN Secretary General put it, “We are in this together — we will get through this together.” To effectively address these unfolding human crises, we must put human rights at the heart of the response. We need to reaffirm our common values of humanity and solidarity. And we need to think outside the box. To that extent, leveraging technology for good is essential, as it now allows us to adapt at levels previously unthinkable.

    Innovation in key areas of technology including cloud computing, AI, and open source means it is now easier than ever to quickly pivot towards addressing the most pressing issues we face. A great example is the Call for Code challenge, which quickly pivoted to take on COVID-19 when the global impact of this pandemic became apparent. Within six weeks, the solutions that emerged addressed everything from how we can keep a physical distance when queuing at stores to helping small businesses re-emerge stronger after a crisis. Many of these are already being considered for deployment opportunities.

  • Bringing Java into the Kubernetes-native future with Quarkus

    By now, you may have seen this funny word floating around the Java development community: Quarkus. And, you may have seen the latest Red Hat news around it, that we are excited to welcome Quarkus as an official Red Hat Runtime.

    But, what does this mean, and why should you be excited about Quarkus? This post will dive into what it means to take Java into the modern, distributed, Kubernetes-first, cloud-native application development world we are in today, and why it is so important.

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