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Alpine 3.10.1 released

Pet, 07/12/2019 - 10:08

The Alpine Linux project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of version 3.10.1 of its Alpine Linux operating system.

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Sparky Linux 4.11 LXDE

Pet, 07/12/2019 - 09:40

Today we are looking at Sparky 4.11 LXDE. It comes with the LXDE desktop environment which Lubuntu previously used, but it is no longer in development, the last release was two years ago but it is great to still have a supported Linux Distro which is using it.

The main feature, of this release, is that it changed the repository from Debian Stable to Old-Stable, so still, Debian 9 which tells me that they won't keep it going for long, but it will still be supported for 2 years, like Debian 9.

It uses about 300 MB of ram when idling and Linux Kernel 4.9 which is dated but playing with the distro, the apps can be a bit slow to open up the first time but perfectly workable and for old machines or any machine for which you want to use all the system resources for your work and the minimum for your system.

Direct/video: Sparky Linux 4.11 LXDE Run Through

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What is Silverblue?

Pet, 07/12/2019 - 09:31

Fedora Silverblue is becoming more and more popular inside and outside the Fedora world. So based on feedback from the community, here are answers to some interesting questions about the project. If you do have any other Silverblue related questions, please leave it in the comments section and we will try to answer them in a future article.

Silverblue is a codename for the new generation of the desktop operating system, previously known as Atomic Workstation. The operating system is delivered in images that are created by utilizing the rpm-ostree project. The main benefits of the system are speed, security, atomic updates and immutability.

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Kdenlive 19.04.3 is out

Pet, 07/12/2019 - 09:07

While the team is out for a much deserved summer break the last minor release post-refactoring is out with another huge amount of fixes. The highlights include fixing compositing and speed effect regressions, thumbnail display issues of clips in the timeline and many Windows fixes. With this release we finished polishing the rough edges and now we can focus on adding new features while fixing other small details left. As usual you can get the latest AppImage from our download page.

Speaking of that, the next major release is less than a month away and it already has some cool new features implemented like changing the speed of a clip by ctrl + resize and pressing shift and hover over a thumb of a clip in the Project Bin to preview it. We’ve also bumped the Qt version to 5.12.4 and updated to the latest MLT. You can grab it from here to test it. Also planned is finishing the 3 point editing workflow and improvements to the speed effect. Stay tuned for more info soon.

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Firefox 68 available now in Fedora

Pet, 07/12/2019 - 09:05

Earlier this week, Mozilla released version 68 of the Firefox web browser. Firefox is the default web browser in Fedora, and this update is now available in the official Fedora repositories.

This Firefox release provides a range of bug fixes and enhancements, including:

Better handling when using dark GTK themes (like Adwaita Dark). Previously, running a dark theme may have caused issues where user interface elements on a rendered webpage (like forms) are rendered in the dark theme, on a white background. Firefox 68 resolves these issues. Refer to these two Mozilla bugzilla tickets for more information.
The about:addons special page has two new features to keep you safer when installing extensions and themes in Firefox. First is the ability to report security and stability issues with addons directly in the about:addons page. Additionally, about:addons now has a list of secure and stable extensions and themes that have been vetted by the Recommended Extensions program.

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KDE Applications 19.04 Reaches End of Life, KDE Apps 19.08 Arrives on August 15

Čet, 07/11/2019 - 21:24

Launched on April 18th, 2019, the KDE Applications 19.04 open-source software suite series received a total of three maintenance updates, the last one being released today as KDE Applications 19.04.3, which fixes some remaining issues but also marks the end of life of KDE Applications 19.04.

KDE Applications 19.04.3 brings numerous changes across various of the included applications, but the most important changes are the fact that the Konqueror and Kontact apps no longer crash on exit when QtWebEngine 5.13 is used and the Python importer in the Umbrello UML app now supports parameters with default arguments.

Also: Applications 19.04.3

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Linux 5.3, LWN's Kernel Coverage and the Linux Foundation

Čet, 07/11/2019 - 20:54
  • Linux 5.3 Enables "-Wimplicit-fallthrough" Compiler Flag

    The recent work on enabling "-Wimplicit-fallthrough" behavior for the Linux kernel has culminated in Linux 5.3 with actually being able to universally enable this compiler feature.

    The -Wimplicit-fallthrough flag on GCC7 and newer warns of cases where switch case fall-through behavior could lead to potential bugs / unexpected behavior.

  • EXT4 For Linux 5.3 Gets Fixes & Faster Case-Insensitive Lookups

    The EXT4 file-system updates have already landed for the Linux 5.3 kernel merge window that opened this week.

    For Linux 5.3, EXT4 maintainer Ted Ts'o sent in primarily a hearty serving of fixes. There are fixes from coverity warnings being addressed to typos and other items for this mature and widely-used Linux file-system.

  • Providing wider access to bpf()

    The bpf() system call allows user space to load a BPF program into the kernel for execution, manipulate BPF maps, and carry out a number of other BPF-related functions. BPF programs are verified and sandboxed, but they are still running in a privileged context and, depending on the type of program loaded, are capable of creating various types of mayhem. As a result, most BPF operations, including the loading of almost all types of BPF program, are restricted to processes with the CAP_SYS_ADMIN capability — those running as root, as a general rule. BPF programs are useful in many contexts, though, so there has long been interest in making access to bpf() more widely available. One step in that direction has been posted by Song Liu; it works by adding a novel security-policy mechanism to the kernel.
    This approach is easy enough to describe. A new special device, /dev/bpf is added, with the core idea that any process that has the permission to open this file will be allowed "to access most of sys_bpf() features" — though what comprises "most" is never really spelled out. A non-root process that wants to perform a BPF operation, such as creating a map or loading a program, will start by opening this file. It then must perform an ioctl() call (BPF_DEV_IOCTL_GET_PERM) to actually enable its ability to call bpf(). That ability can be turned off again with the BPF_DEV_IOCTL_PUT_PERM ioctl() command.

    Internally to the kernel, this mechanism works by adding a new field (bpf_flags) to the task_struct structure. When BPF access is enabled, a bit is set in that field. If this patch goes forward, that detail is likely to change since, as Daniel Borkmann pointed out, adding an unsigned long to that structure for a single bit of information is unlikely to be popular; some other location for that bit will be found.

  • The io.weight I/O-bandwidth controller

    Part of the kernel's job is to arbitrate access to the available hardware resources and ensure that every process gets its fair share, with "its fair share" being defined by policies specified by the administrator. One resource that must be managed this way is I/O bandwidth to storage devices; if due care is not taken, an I/O-hungry process can easily saturate a device, starving out others. The kernel has had a few I/O-bandwidth controllers over the years, but the results have never been entirely satisfactory. But there is a new controller on the block that might just get the job done.
    There are a number of challenges facing an I/O-bandwidth controller. Some processes may need a guarantee that they will get at least a minimum amount of the available bandwidth to a given device. More commonly in recent times, though, the focus has shifted to latency: a process should be able to count on completing an I/O request within a bounded period of time. The controller should be able to provide those guarantees while still driving the underlying device at something close to its maximum rate. And, of course, hardware varies widely, so the controller must be able to adapt its operation to each specific device.

    The earliest I/O-bandwidth controller allows the administrator to set maximum bandwidth limits for each control group. That controller, though, will throttle I/O even if the device is otherwise idle, causing the loss of I/O bandwidth. The more recent io.latency controller is focused on I/O latency, but as Tejun Heo, the author of the new controller, notes in the patch series, this controller really only protects the lowest-latency group, penalizing all others if need be to meet that group's requirements. He set out to create a mechanism that would allow more control over how I/O bandwidth is allocated to groups.

  • TurboSched: the return of small-task packing

    CPU scheduling is a difficult task in the best of times; it is not trivial to pick the next process to run while maintaining fairness, minimizing energy use, and using the available CPUs to their fullest potential. The advent of increasingly complex system architectures is not making things easier; scheduling on asymmetric systems (such as the big.LITTLE architecture) is a case in point. The "turbo" mode provided by some recent processors is another. The TurboSched patch set from Parth Shah is an attempt to improve the scheduler's ability to get the best performance from such processors.
    Those of us who have been in this field for far too long will, when seeing "turbo mode", think back to the "turbo button" that appeared on personal computers in the 1980s. Pushing it would clock the processor beyond its original breathtaking 4.77MHz rate to something even faster — a rate that certain applications were unprepared for, which is why the "go slower" mode was provided at all. Modern turbo mode is a different thing, though, and it's not just a matter of a missing front-panel button. In short, it allows a processor to be overclocked above its rated maximum frequency for a period of time when the load on the rest of system overall allows it.

    Turbo mode can thus increase the CPU cycles available to a given process, but there is a reason why the CPU's rated maximum frequency is lower than what turbo mode provides. The high-speed mode can only be sustained as long as the CPU temperature does not get too high and, crucially (for the scheduler), the overall power load on the system must not be too high. That, in turn, implies that some CPUs must be powered down; if all CPUs are running, there will not be enough power available for any of those CPUs to go into the turbo mode. This mode, thus, is only usable for certain types of workloads and will not be usable (or beneficial) for many others.

  • EdgeX Foundry Announces Production Ready Release Providing Open Platform for IoT Edge Computing to a Growing Global Ecosystem

    EdgeX Foundry, a project under the LF Edge umbrella organization within the Linux Foundation that aims to establish an open, interoperable framework for edge IoT computing independent of hardware, silicon, application cloud, or operating system, today announced the availability of its “Edinburgh” release. Created collaboratively by a global ecosystem, EdgeX Foundry’s new release is a key enabler of digital transformation for IoT use cases and is a platform for real-world applications both for developers and end users across many vertical markets. EdgeX community members have created a range of complementary products and services, including commercial support, training and customer pilot programs and plug-in enhancements for device connectivity, applications, data and system management and security.

    Launched in April 2017, and now part of the LF Edge umbrella, EdgeX Foundry is an open source, loosely-coupled microservices framework that provides the choice to plug and play from a growing ecosystem of available third party offerings or to augment proprietary innovations. With a focus on the IoT Edge, EdgeX simplifies the process to design, develop and deploy solutions across industrial, enterprise, and consumer applications.

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Proprietary Software and Security Failures

Čet, 07/11/2019 - 20:52
  • Apple has pushed a silent Mac update to remove hidden Zoom web server

    Apple has released a silent update for Mac users removing a vulnerable component in Zoom, the popular video conferencing app, which allowed websites to automatically add a user to a video call without their permission.

    The Cupertino, Calif.-based tech giant told TechCrunch that the update — now released — removes the hidden web server, which Zoom quietly installed on users’ Macs when they installed the app.

  • Microsoft denies it will move production out of China

    Nikkei had also previously reported in June that Apple is similarly considering moving between 15% and 30% of all iPhone production out of China and has asked its major suppliers to weigh up the costs.

  • Microsoft's reseller chief explains why it's angering some of its partners by taking away a key perk: 'We can't afford to run every single partner's organization for free anymore'

    Gavriella Schuster, corporate vice president and One Commercial Partner channel chief at Microsoft, says that while it cost the company practically nothing to provide partners with traditional software, it would be a significant expense for the company to provide cloud services like Office 365 for free.

  • KRP: At least 1,000 devices compromised in data breach in Lahti

    KRP on Tuesday revealed that its pre-trial investigation shows that the unauthorised access detected in the city’s data systems earlier this summer was an organised attack rather than an error by an individual user.

    The attacker or attackers managed to cause damage by actively spreading a malware, compromising at least a thousand devices.

  • GnuPG 2.2.17 released to mitigate attacks on keyservers

    gpg: Ignore all key-signatures received from keyservers. This change is required to mitigate a DoS due to keys flooded with faked key-signatures. The old behaviour can be achieved by adding keyserver-options no-self-sigs-only,no-import-clean to your gpg.conf. [#4607]

  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (dosbox and openjpeg2), Oracle (dbus and kernel), Scientific Linux (dbus), Slackware (mozilla), and SUSE (fence-agents, libqb, postgresql10, and sqlite3).

  • What Is Zero Trust Architecture?

    Zero Trust architecture might be popular now, but that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s for you. If you find your needs are met by your current security, you may not want to switch. That said, keep in mind that waiting until you have a security breach isn’t an ideal way to evaluate your security.

  • OpenPGP certificate flooding

    A problem with the way that OpenPGP public-key certificates are handled by key servers and applications is wreaking some havoc, but not just for those who own the certificates (and keys)—anyone who has those keys on their keyring and does regular updates will be affected. It is effectively a denial of service attack, but one that propagates differently than most others. The mechanism of this "certificate flooding" is one that is normally used to add attestations to the key owner's identity (also known as "signing the key"), but because of the way most key servers work, it can be used to fill a certificate with "spam"—with far-reaching effects.

    The problems have been known for many years, but they were graphically illustrated by attacks on the keys of two well-known members of the OpenPGP community, Daniel Kahn Gillmor ("dkg") and Robert J. Hansen ("rjh"), in late June. Gillmor first reported the attack on his blog. It turned out that someone had added multiple bogus certifications (or attestations) to his public key in the SKS key server pool; an additional 55,000 certifications were added, bloating his key to 17MB in size. Hansen's key got spammed even worse, with nearly 150,000 certifications—the maximum number that the OpenPGP protocol will support.

    The idea behind these certifications is to support the "web of trust". If user Alice believes that a particular key for user Bob is valid (because, for example, they sat down over beers and verified that), Alice can so attest by adding a certification to Bob's key. Now if other users who trust Alice come across Bob's key, they can be reasonably sure that the key is Bob's because Alice (cryptographically) said so. That is the essence of the web of trust, though in practice, it is often not really used to do that kind of verification outside of highly technical communities. In addition, anyone can add a certification, whether they know the identity of the key holder or not.

  • FinSpy Malware ‘Returns’ To Steal Data On Both Android And iOS

    As per the researchers, the spyware was again active in 2018 and the latest activity was spotted in Myanmar in June 2019. These implants are capable of collecting personal information such as SMS, Emails, Calendars, Device Locations, Multimedia and even messages from some popular social media apps.

    If you are an iOS user, then the implant is only observed to work on jailbroken devices. If an iOS device is already jailbroken then this spyware can be remotely installed via different mediums like messaging, email, etc. However, the implants have not been observed on the latest version of iOS.

  • New FinSpy iOS and Android implants revealed ITW

    FinSpy is spyware made by the German company Gamma Group. Through its UK-based subsidiary Gamma International Gamma Group sells FinSpy to government and law enforcement organizations all over the world. FinSpy is used to collect a variety of private user information on various platforms. Its implants for desktop devices were first described in 2011 by Wikileaks and mobile implants were discovered in 2012. Since then Kaspersky has continuously monitored the development of this malware and the emergence of new versions in the wild. According to our telemetry, several dozen unique mobile devices have been infected over the past year, with recent activity recorded in Myanmar in June 2019. Late in 2018, experts at Kaspersky looked at the functionally latest versions of FinSpy implants for iOS and Android, built in mid-2018. Mobile implants for iOS and Android have almost the same functionality. They are capable of collecting personal information such as contacts, SMS/MMS messages, emails, calendars, GPS location, photos, files in memory, phone call recordings and data from the most popular messengers.

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today's howtos

Čet, 07/11/2019 - 20:50

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Fedora: Google Code-in, Python and NeuroFedora

Čet, 07/11/2019 - 20:48
  • Fedora Community Blog: GCI 2018 mentor’s summit @ Google headquarters

    Google Code-in is a contest to introduce students (ages 13-17) to open source software development. Since 2010, 8,108 students from 107 countries have completed over 40,100 open source tasks Because Google Code-in is often the first experience many students have with open source, the contest is designed to make it easy for students to jump right in. I was one of the mentors in this first time for Fedora program. We had 125 students participating in Fedora and the top 3 students completed 26, 25 and 22 tasks each.

    Every year Google invites the Grand-Prize winners and their parents, and a mentor to it’s headquarters in San Francisco, California for a 4 days trip. I was offered the opportunity to go and represent Fedora in the summit and meet these 2 brilliant folks in person. This report covers activities and other things that happened there.

  • Fedora mulls its "python" version

    There is no doubt that the transition from Python 2 to Python 3 has been a difficult one, but Linux distributions have been particularly hard hit. For many people, that transition is largely over; Python 2 will be retired at the end of this year, at least by the core development team. But distributions will have to support Python 2 for quite a while after that. As part of any transition, the version that gets run from the python binary (or symbolic link) is something that needs to be worked out. Fedora is currently discussing what to do about that for Fedora 31.

    Fedora program manager Ben Cotton posted a proposal to make python invoke Python 3 in Fedora 31 to the Fedora devel mailing list. The proposal, titled "Python means Python 3", is also on the Fedora wiki. The idea is that wherever "python" is used it will refer to version 3, including when it is installed by DNF (i.e. dnf install python) or when Python packages are installed, so installing "python-requests" will install the Python 3 version of the Requests library. In addition, a wide array of associated tools (e.g. pip, pylint, idle, and flask) will also use the Python 3 versions.

    The "Requests" link above does point to a potential problem area, however. It shows that Requests for Python 3 III is not fully finished, with an expected release sometime "before PyCon 2020" (mid-April 2020), which is well after the expected October 2019 release of Fedora 31. The distribution already has a python3-requests package, though, so that will be picked up as python-requests in Fedora 31 if this proposal is adopted. There may be other packages out there where Python 3 support is not complete but, at this point, most of the major libraries have converted.

  • NeuroFedora poster at CNS*2019

    With CNS*2019 around the corner, we worked on getting the NeuroFedora poster ready for the poster presentation session. Our poster is P96, on the first poster session on the 14th of July.

    [...]

    Unfortunately, this time, no one from the team is able to attend the conference, but if you are there and want to learn more about NeuroFedora, please get in touch with us using any of our communication channels.

    To everyone that will be in Barcelona for the conference, we hope you have a fruitful one, and of course, we hope you are able to make some time to rest at the beach too.

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OSS Leftovers

Čet, 07/11/2019 - 20:46
  • A Diatribe Concerning My Experiences With Gopher

    This is an article that will collect my opinions concerning Gopher experiences and practices, primarily those I dislike, with regards to conventions I've encountered and whatnot. I'll update this article as I have more to write of and feel the want.

  • A Look at the Open-Source Tools Behind Today’s State-of-the-Art Visual Effects

    Today, Software Defined Visualization (SDVis) is the ultimate in the world of visualization, allowing the best-of-the-best to emerge. It’s hardly a secret in the world of scientific visualization, digital animation, and computer graphics (CG). Go to any hit movie these days, and the results of SDVis will be present to help make the incredible believable.

  • Arturo Borrero González: Netfilter workshop 2019 Malaga summary

    This week we had the annual Netfilter Workshop. This time the venue was in Malaga (Spain). We had the hotel right in the Malaga downtown and the meeting room was in University ETSII Malaga. We had plenty of talks, sessions, discussions and debates, and I will try to summarice in this post what it was about.

    Florian Westphal, Linux kernel hacker, Netfilter coreteam member and engineer from Red Hat, started with a talk related the some works being done in the core of the Netfilter code in the kernel to convert packet processing to lists. He shared an overview of current problems and challenges. Processing in a list rather than per packet seems to have several benefits: code can be smarter and faster, so this seems like a good improvement. On the other hand, Florian thinks some of the pain to refactor all the code may not worth it. Other approaches may be considered to introduce even more fast forwarding paths (apart from the flow table mechanisms for example which is already available).

    Florian also followed up with the next topic: testing. We are starting to have a lot of duplicated code to do testing. Suggestion by Pablo is to introduce some dedicated tools to ease in maintenance and testing itself. Special mentions to nfqueue and tproxy, 2 mechanisms that requires quite a bit of code to be well tested (and could be hard to setup anyway).

    [...]

    After lunch, Pablo followed up with a status update on hardware flow offload capabilities for nftables. He started with an overview of the current status of ethtool_rx and tc offloads, capabilities and limitations. It should be possible for most commodity hardware to support some variable amount of offload capabilities, but apparently the code was not in very good shape. The new flow block API should improve this situation, while also giving support for nftables offload. Related article in LWN: https://lwn.net/Articles/793080/

    Next talk was by Phil, engineer at Red Hat. He commented on user-defined strings in nftables, which presents some challenges. Some debate happened, mostly to get to an agreement on how to proceed.

  • QMO: Firefox Nightly 70 Testday, July 19th

    We are happy to let you know that Friday, July 19th, we are organizing Firefox Nightly 70 Testday. We’ll be focusing our testing on: Fission.

  • This free open-source tool can help game developers make procedural ivy [Ed: Mono is a problem]

    This is a tool specifically for games being made in Unity, an engine which has been used to make plenty of games people don't associate with it—games like Hearthstone, Cities: Skylines, Wasteland 2, Beat Saber, and Cuphead, for instance, were all made in Unity.

  • Popular licenses in OpenAPI

    Note: Before you start complaining, I realise this is probably a very sub-optimal solution code-wise, but it worked for me. In my defence, I did open up my copy of the Sed & Awk Pocket Reference before my eyes went all glassy and I hacked up the following ugly method. Also note that the shell scripts are in Fish shell and may not work directly in a 100% POSIX shell.

    First, I needed to get a data set to work on. Hat-tip to Mike Ralphson for pointing me to APIs Guru as a good resource. I analysed their APIs-guru/openapi-directory repository1, where in the APIs folder they keep a big collection of public APIs. Most of them following the OpenAPI (previously Swagger) specification.

  • Infinite work is less work The first task of last week's Perl Weekly Challenge was to print the first ten strong and weak primes. A prime pn is "strong" if it's larger than the average of its two neighbouring primes (i.e. pn > (pn-1+pn+1)/2). A prime is "weak" if it's smaller than the average of its two neighbours. Of course, this challenge would be trivial if we happened to have a list of all the prime numbers. Then we'd just filter out the first ten that are strong, and the first ten that are weak. In fact, it would be even easier if we happened to have a list of all the strong primes, and a list of all the weak ones. Then we'd just print the first ten of each. But there are an infinite number of primes and of weak primes (and possibly of strong primes too, though that's still only conjectured), so building a complete list of the various subspecies of primes is impractical in most programming languages.

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German data protection organization: use of Office 365 in schools is illegal

Čet, 07/11/2019 - 19:30

The data protection officer of the German federal state of Hessen has warned that the cloud-based Office 365 solution is not a compliant solution for use in schools when student information is being stored on it. This fits with earlier, similar conclusions by the Swedish and Dutch governments – US cloud solutions are not GDPR compliant.

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KDE Plasma 5.16.3 Desktop Environment Released with More Than 30 Improvements

Čet, 07/11/2019 - 19:16

KDE Plasma 5.16.3 comes two weeks after the KDE Plasma 5.16.2 update with more than 30 changes across various core components and apps, including Plasma Workspace, Plasma Desktop, Plasma Audio Volume Control, Plasma Networkmanager (plasma-nm), KWin, Plasma Discover, DrKonqi, KWayland-integration, plasma-browser-integration, plasma-integration, and kde-cli-tools.

"Today KDE releases a bugfix update to KDE Plasma 5, versioned 5.16.3. Plasma 5.16 was released in June with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience. This release adds a fortnight's worth of new translations and fixes from KDE's contributors. The bugfixes are typically small but important," reads the release announcement.

Also: Plasma 5.16.3

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The Performance Impact To AMD Zen 2 Compiler Tuning On GCC 9 + Znver2

Čet, 07/11/2019 - 19:12

One of the areas that I always have "fun" benchmarking for new CPU launches is looking at the compiler performance. Following the recent Ryzen 3000 series launch I carried out some initial benchmarks looking at the current Zen 2 performance using the newest GCC 9 stable series with its "znver2" optimizations. Here is a look at how the Znver2 optimizations work out when running some benchmarks on the optimized binaries with a Ryzen 9 3900X running Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

AMD developers introduced the initial Znver2 support into the GNU Compiler Collection last November and thus is part of the GCC 9 stable release that debuted in May. This was their initial cut support for the updated Zen microarchitecture but sadly hasn't seen any enhancements since that initial commit. The Znver2 target does bring some alterations to the cost tables and enables the CLWB / RDPID / WBNOINVD instructions. But as we found out during the Ryzen 3000 briefings, there are more instructions new to Zen 2 besides those like RDPRU, so unfortunately this support while appreciated isn't yet fully complete and likely missing various optimizations considering there haven't been any updates since November. Sadly any improvements made now to their GCC Znver2 support won't see users until the GCC 10 release in Q2'2020 and thus not making it into the likes of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS and other distributions.

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Raspberry Pi 4: Hardware first impressions

Čet, 07/11/2019 - 19:08

The Raspberry Pi 4 was announced - and available - about two weeks ago. That's about six months earlier than was generally expected; Eben Upton explains how this came to be in the linked announcement. Like many Raspberry Pi users, I got very excited when I saw the announcement, so I went directly to the Pi-Shop.ch web page, and was pleased to find that it was already available there - so I ordered one right away.

It arrived the next day, but when I opened the box I was confronted with the harsh reality that I had gone charging into this latest adventure without actually bothering to put my brain into gear first.

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What is the Open Document Format (ODF), and how is it developed?

Čet, 07/11/2019 - 17:43

Open Document Format is LibreOffice’s native file format. (If you have a file with a .odt, .ods, .odp or .odg extension, then it’s an Open Document Text, Spreadsheet or Presentation file or Graphic respectively.)

ODF is developed by OASIS, then submitted to ISO (the International Organization for Standardization), and then adopted as a standard. There is also a working group at ISO, which by the way also works on OOXML – which can then ask questions about development, and so on.

For ODF we are now working on version 1.3. We had a “feature freeze” last summer. We have come so far that everything we wanted to have in it is available in the “editor version”. Now we’re going to fine-tune it, then we’ll be back in summer – so that was a whole year. Then comes the coordination process at OASIS, so it usually takes two years until a new version of the standard is ready.

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