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Programming: Apache's Kafka, LLVM's Clang and Google's Go

tuxmachines.org - staro 2 ur 14 min
  • Building Apache Kafka Streams applications using Red Hat AMQ Streams: Part 2

    The Apache Kafka project includes a Streams Domain-Specific Language (DSL) built on top of the lower-level Stream Processor API. This DSL provides developers with simple abstractions for performing data processing operations. However, how one builds a stream processing pipeline in a containerized environment with Kafka isn’t clear. This second article in a two-part series uses the basics from the previous article to build an example application using Red Hat AMQ Streams.

    Now let’s create a multi-stage pipeline operating on real-world data and consume and visualize the data.

  • Clang "Interface Stubs" Merged For Offering Interface Libraries To ELF Shared Objects

    In addition to Clang-Scan-Deps being merged a few days ago, another new feature for LLVM's Clang is called the Clang Interface Stubs and brings a concept from Windows/macOS over to Linux/ELF systems.

    Clang Interface Stubs allows generating stub files/libraries containing the mininal information needed to build against that library. The Clang Interface Stubs can be used for limiting access to a library's internal systems or breaking up build dependencies thanks to the minimal approach.

  • Five Tech Companies Discuss Golang Advantages

    Since it first appeared at Google in 2009, thousands of developers (and entire businesses) have adopted the open-source coding language Go for key software-based products and services. Designed to mimic core features of C, Go’s authors sought to maximize brevity and simplicity. Today, the language’s clarity and lack of ambiguity around its syntax makes it a favorite with developers.

    We spoke with technologists at five tech companies about what they’ve built in Go, and why they chose it for those particular tools and services.

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Fedora: ppc64le, release-monitoring.org and GNOME Sessions

tuxmachines.org - staro 2 ur 16 min
  • Why it's useful to use a deskop on ppc64le

    I want provide a short example what I've met in the past weeks when dog-fooding a ppc64le Fedora desktop environment on my OpenPOWER based Talos II. We have experienced segfaults coming from a smashed stack in some desktop components, although no one using the mainstream arches noticed them. The toolchain guys will be able to explain why eg. x86_64 is immune (or just lucky), but the problems were real issues in the projects' source code. The common denominator was an incorrect callback signature for GTK+ based apps, the callbacks expected different parameters than were passed by their callers. And this kind of inconsistency can't be found during compile time. IMHO it opens possibilities for some static analysis before producing the binaries by looking at the signal definitions in GTK+ and what functions/callbacks are then attached to them in the projects. Or for some AI that will analyze the crashes and look for the common pattern and recommend a solution. And what's the conclusion - as usually, heterogenity helps to improve quality

  • Stories from the amazing world of release-monitoring.org #6

    In the dungeons bellow the-new-hotness island was impenetrable darkness. It looks like somebody tried to destroy every source of light. Only my own levitating fireball was shedding some light around. Damage was still visible on walls and furniture, but most of it is now repaired to function properly. I’m glad that you are here with me, otherwise it will be a scary experience. But you probably want to hear what happened.

  • How to Configure Xorg as Default GNOME Session in Fedora

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Games: Overcooked! 2, Stimulating Simulator Sale, PyGamer and Atari VCS

tuxmachines.org - staro 3 ur 6 min
  • Overcooked! 2 - Night of the Hangry Horde extends one of the best co-op games even further

    Overcooked! 2, an absolutely brilliant game to play in co-op just recently got even bigger with the Night of the Hangry Horde DLC now available. You can either buy it directly or if you have the Season Pass, it's another that's included.

    Sounds like quite an amusing DLC, as it comes with a new Horde Mode which actually looks pretty good. More than just a silly name, it introduces some new game mechanics as you try to repel waves of undead ingredients across eight levels. On top of that there's twelve additional levels, nine new kitchens, and four new chefs to pick from.

  • The Stimulating Simulator Sale at the Humble Store is live, some good Linux games are in

    Here's a sale to start your week with! The Stimulating Simulator Sale is now live on the Humble Store until June 21st.

    As expected, there's a rather varied selection as what makes a "Simulator" seems to have a pretty broad definition and some are pushing it a bit.

  • PyGamer open source handheld gaming starter kit $59.95

    Expanding their PyGamer offerings, Adafruit has now made available the PyGamer Starter Kit priced at $59.95 providing everything you need to create your very own fully functional open source pocket handheld games console that can run CircuitPython, MakeCode Arcade or Arduino games you write yourself. Equipped with a 1.8″ 160×128 color TFT display with dimmable backlight, dual-potentiometer analog stick and buttons.

    On the rear of the device Adafruit have also thoughtfully included a full Feather-compatible header socket set, enabling those interested to plug-in any FeatherWing to expand the capabilities of the PyGamer. There are also 3 STEMMA connectors – two 3-pin with ADC/PWM capability and one 4-pin that connects to I2C which can also be used for Grove sensors. Checkout the PyGamer Starter Kit in the video below.

  • Atari VCS Linux-powered gaming console now available for pre-order for $249

    At the E3 Expo, the largest video game trade event in the world, which took place recently in Los Angeles, US, Atari made a big announcement concerning advances of the Atari VCS. For those new to Atari VCS, it is a home gaming and entertainment system.

    Gamers can enjoy Atari’s world of all-new and classic games, including Atari games, streaming multimedia and personal apps; or can easily make their own.

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V Mississippiju nastaja robotska tovarna raket

Slo-Tech - staro 3 ur 29 min
V Mississippiju nastaja robotska tovarna raket

vir: Ars TechnicaArs Technica - Ameriško zasebno raketno podjetje Relativity Space je od Nase najelo prostore v raketni bazi Stennis Space Center v Mississippiju, v katerih postavljajo visoko robotizirano tovarno za proizvodnjo raket, s katero želijo bistveno skrčiti tako čas kot stroške nastanka vesoljskih plovil. Več na Slo-Techu.

A beginner's guide to Linux permissions

tuxmachines.org - staro 3 ur 40 min

One of the main benefits of Linux systems is that they are known to be less prone to security vulnerabilities and exploits than other systems. Linux definitely gives users more flexibility and granular controls over its file systems' security permissions. This may imply that it's critical for Linux users to understand security permissions. That isn't necessarily true, but it's still wise for beginning users to understand the basics of Linux permissions.

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Stable kernels 5.1.11, 4.19.52, 4.14.127, 4.9.182, and 4.4.182

tuxmachines.org - staro 3 ur 45 min
  • Linux 5.1.11

    I'm announcing the release of the 5.1.11 kernel.

    All users of the 5.1 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 5.1.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.1.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 4.19.52
  • Linux 4.14.127
  • Linux 4.9.182
  • Linux 4.4.182

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Clang "Interface Stubs" Merged For Offering Interface Libraries To ELF Shared Objects

Phoronix - staro 6 ur 2 min
In addition to Clang-Scan-Deps being merged a few days ago, another new feature for LLVM's Clang is called the Clang Interface Stubs and brings a concept from Windows/macOS over to Linux/ELF systems...

Kernel: 412k+ Lines of Code From AMD and Toolchains Microconference Accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

tuxmachines.org - staro 7 ur 25 min
  • AMD Posts 459 Linux Kernel Patches Providing Navi Support - 412k+ Lines Of Code

    As we've been expecting, AMD's open-source developers today posted their set of patches enabling Navi (10) support within their AMDGPU DRM kernel driver. Bringing up the Navi support in kernel-space are 459 patches amounting to more than four-hundred thousand lines of code, not counting the work done to LLVM as part of their shader compiler back-end or the yet-to-be-published OpenGL/Vulkan driver patches.

    This big code addition is necessary given all the changes to Navi10/RDNA but, yes, a lot of the changes are automated register headers. This initial open-source Navi GPU support includes the core driver enablement, display support using their new DCN2 "Display Core Next 2", GFX10 graphics and compute, SDMA5 system DMA, VCN2 "Video Core Next 2" multimedia encode/decode, and power management.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: Toolchains Microconference Accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the Toolchains Microconference has been accepted into the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference! The Linux kernel may
    be one of the most powerful systems around, but it takes a powerful toolchain to make that happen. The kernel takes advantage of any feature
    that the toolchains provide, and collaboration between the kernel and toolchain developers will make that much more seamless.

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Server: Red Hat, CentOS 8, Linux On ARM Servers and IBM

tuxmachines.org - staro 7 ur 54 min
  • Why Chefs Collaborate in the Kitchen

    In a large commercial kitchen, for example hotels or cafeterias, chefs collaborate to create the recipes and meals. Sure, there is more than enough work for one person, and tasks are divided into chopping, mixing, cleaning, garnishing; but the recipe is collaboratively created.

    Suppose one chef broke away and created his or her own recipe? How would the kitchen maintain standards, tastes and reputation? Developing software using open source principles follows a similar theory.

    [...]

    Red Hat is the second largest corporate contributor to the Linux kernel. This means Red Hat engineers and support staff are well versed and able to resolve customer issues involving the Linux kernel. Every application container includes part of the Linux distribution and relies on the Linux kernel, which is the center of the Linux Operating System.

  • CentOS 8 Status 17-June-2019

    Since the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 (on 07-May) we've been looking into the tools that we use to build CentOS Linux. We've chosen to use the Koji buildsystem for RPMs, paired with the Module Build Service for modules, delivered through a distribution called Mbox.

    Mbox allows us to run the Koji Hub (the central job orchestrator), and the Module Build Service in an instance of OKD that we maintain specifically for our buildsystem work. We have 2 instances of mbox; one for the primary architectures (x86_64, ppc64le, and aarch64), and one for the secondary architecture (armhfp). OKD lets us run those instances on the same hardware but in separate namespaces. The builder machines are separate from the OKD cluster, and connect back to the individual buildsystems that they're assigned to.

  • CentOS 8.0 Is Looking Like It's Still Some Weeks Out

    For those eager to see CentOS 8.0 as the community open-source rebuild of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0, progress is being made but it looks like the release is still some weeks out.

    There's been the Wiki page detailing the state of affairs for CentOS 8.0. New today is a blog post summing up the current status. Progress is being made both on building the traditional RHEL8 RPM packages as well as the newer modules/streams. Koji is being used to build the RPMs while the Module Build Service with Mbox is handling the modules.

  • NVIDIA Brings CUDA to Arm, Enabling New Path to Exascale Supercomputing

    International Supercomputing Conference -- NVIDIA today announced its support for Arm CPUs, providing the high performance computing industry a new path to build extremely energy-efficient, AI-enabled exascale supercomputers.

  • NVIDIA Delivering CUDA To Linux On Arm For HPC/Servers

    NVIDIA announced this morning for ISC 2019 that they are bringing CUDA to Arm beyond their work already for supporting GPU computing with lower-power Tegra SoCs.

  • Nvidia pushes ARM supercomputing

    Graphics chip maker Nvidia is best known for consumer computing, vying with AMD's Radeon line for framerates and eye candy. But the venerable giant hasn't ignored the rise of GPU-powered applications that have little or nothing to do with gaming. In the early 2000s, UNC researcher Mark Harris began work popularizing the term "GPGPU," referencing the use of Graphics Processing Units for non-graphics-related tasks. But most of us didn't really become aware of the non-graphics-related possibilities until GPU-powered bitcoin-mining code was released in 2010, and shortly thereafter, strange boxes packed nearly solid with high-end gaming cards started popping up everywhere.

  • At ISC: DDN Launches EXA5 for AI, Big Data, HPC Workloads
  • IBM Makes Takes Another Big Step To Hybrid Computing

    Today, IBM announced the ability to leverage its unique turnkey operating environment, IBM i, and its AIX UNIX operating systems on IBM Cloud. Both OSs debuted in the 1980s and have a long history with many IBM customers. In addition, IBM i remains one of the most automated, fully integrated, and low-maintenance operating environments. Extending both OSs to IBM Cloud will allow customers to expand their resources on-demand, to migrate to the cloud, to leverage the latest Power9 servers, and to leverage IBM’s extensive resources. IBM is rolling out the service first in North America for customers using IBM i or AIX on Power servers. In conjunction with the extension of the hybrid cloud platform, IBM also announced a program to validate business partners with Power Systems expertise.

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today's howtos

tuxmachines.org - staro 7 ur 57 min

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Radeon Software for Linux 19.20 Brings RHEL 8.0 Support

Phoronix - staro 7 ur 58 min
Quietly released last week was Radeon Software for Linux 19.20, the latest quarterly update to AMD's packaged Linux driver that consists of their AMDGPU-PRO binary driver option as well as the AMDGPU-Open packaged components using a snapshot of Mesa...

Latest Security FUD in the Media

tuxmachines.org - staro 8 ur 16 min

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Programming/Development: Zato, Wing, Receiving Code Review, CoffeeScript and BASIC

tuxmachines.org - staro 8 ur 43 min
  • Zato 3.1 Released - Open-Source Python-based API Integrations and Backend Application Server

    The newest version of Zato, the open-source Python-based enterprise API integrations platform and backend application server, is out with a lot of interesting features, changes and additions.

  • Extending Wing with Python (Part Two)

    To debug extension scripts written for Wing, you will need to set up a new project that is configured so that Wing can debug itself. The manual steps for doing this are documented in Debugging Extension Scripts. However, let's use an extension script to do this automatically.

  • Robbie Harwood: Receiving Code Review

    From a maintainer's perspective, that's the primary role of code review: to ensure project quality and continued maintainability. But there's an important secondary purpose as well: to help contributors (and potential contributors) learn and grow. In other words, receiving code review is a learning and growth opportunity, and should be approached as such.

    And so, first and foremost: code review is not a judgement on you. It's a second set of eyes, and both of you are trying to make sure the changes are good. If they didn't want the change in the project, they'd say so! Subtlety isn't what's happening here. And besides, if anyone were perfect, we would do code review.

    Which leads into: everyone needs code review. No change is too small for it, and no one is perfect. I've broken builds by changing only documentation, and flagged potential security issues from developers who have been coding almost as long as I've been alive. (And they've done the same to me!) That's normal. That's life. That's code review.

    And it's fine, because we don't need it to be perfect on the first try. Contributing to open source isn't a school exam where we get a single attempt and it's most of the grade. We're concerned only with improving our software, and if there's grading at all, it's externally imposed (e.g., by an employer).

  • Best Free Books to Learn about CoffeeScript

    CoffeeScript is a very succinct programming language that transcompiles into JavaScript, so there is no interpretation at runtime. The syntax is inspired by Ruby, Python and Haskell, and implements many features from these three languages.

    CoffeeScript is closely related to JavaScript without having its eccentricities. However, CoffeeScript offers more than fixing many of the oddities of JavaScript, as it has some useful features including array comprehensions, prototype aliases and classes. It allows developers to write less code to get more done.

  • 10 PRINT Memorial in New Hampshire marks the birthplace of BASIC

    After just over 55 years, the birthplace of BASIC has been honoured with a memorial marker in New Hampshire, USA.

    Thanks to a campaign by local paper columnist David Brooks, the New Hampshire Historical Highway Marker was installed earlier this month.

    Professor John Kemeny, Maths professor Thomas Kurtz, and a group undergraduate students at Dartmouth College (pics) created BASIC (Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code). The first program ran on 1 May 1964.

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Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Gaming News Punch, GNU World Order and More

tuxmachines.org - staro 8 ur 56 min

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Release of DragonFly BSD 5.6

tuxmachines.org - staro 9 ur 7 min
  • DragonFly BSD 5.6

    DragonFly version 5.6 brings an improved virtual memory system, updates to radeon and ttm, and performance improvements for HAMMER2.

    The details of all commits between the 5.4 and 5.6 branches are available in the associated commit messages for 5.6.0rc1 and 5.6.0.

  • DragonFlyBSD 5.6 Released With VM System, HAMMER2 In Good Shape

    DragonFlyBSD 5.6 is now available as the latest major update to this popular BSD operating system.

    DragonFlyBSD 5.6 brings the HAMMER2 file-system by default following numerous improvements this cycle to HAMMER2 to put it now in comparable/better standing than HAMMER1. HAMMER1 though remains available for those interested. I'll have out some new HAMMER2 DragonFlyBSD benchmarks shortly.

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Qt 5.12.4

tuxmachines.org - staro 9 ur 14 min
  • Qt 5.12.4 Released with support for OpenSSL 1.1.1

    The update to OpenSSL 1.1.1 is important to note for users leveraging OpenSSL in their applications. We wanted to update now as the earlier version of OpenSSL runs out of support at the end of the year and some platforms, such as Android, need the new one even sooner. Unfortunately OpenSSL 1.1 is binary incompatible with 1.0, so users need to switch to the new one and repackage their applications. One important functionality enabled by OpenSSL 1.1 is TLS 1.3 bringing significant cryptography and speed improvements. As part of the change, some old and insecure crypto algorithms have been removed and support for some new crypto algorithms added. For the users not leveraging OpenSSL in their applications, no actions are needed. OpenSSL is not included in a Qt application, unless explicitly so defined by the developer.

    Going forward, Qt 5.12 LTS will receive many more patch releases throughout the coming years and we recommend all active developed projects to migrate to Qt 5.12 LTS. Qt 5.9 LTS is currently in ‘Strict’ phase and receives only the selected important bug and security fixes, while Qt 5.12 LTS is currently receiving all the bug fixes. Qt 5.6 Support has ended in March 2019, so all active projects still using Qt 5.6 LTS should migrate to a later version of Qt.

  • Qt 5.12.4 Released with support for OpenSSL 1.1.1

    Qt developers have announced the new release of Qt 5.12.4 on 17th June, 2019.

    Qt 5.12.4, the fourth patch release of Qt 5.12 LTS.

    It provides a number of bug fixes, as well as performance and other improvements.

    Also, it provides binaries build with OpenSSL 1.1.1, including the new TLS 1.3 functionality.

    Qt 5.12.4 provides around 250 bug fixes compared with the previous release of Qt 5.12.3.

    OpenSSL 1.1.1 has beenn updated since the older version of OpenSSL runs out of support at the end of the year.

    And some platforms requires OpenSSL 1.1.1 sooner like Android, etc.,

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DragonFlyBSD 5.6 Released With VM System, HAMMER2 In Good Shape

Phoronix - Tor, 06/18/2019 - 00:19
DragonFlyBSD 5.6 is now available as the latest major update to this popular BSD operating system...

Stable kernel updates

LWN.net - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 21:19
Stable kernels 5.1.11, 4.19.52, 4.14.127, 4.9.182, and 4.4.182 have been released. They all contain a relatively small set of important fixes; users should upgrade.
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