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Games Leftovers

tuxmachines.org - Sre, 08/29/2018 - 18:37

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Linux 4.18.6 Kernel To Properly Report AMD Threadripper 2 CPU Temperature

Phoronix - Sre, 08/29/2018 - 18:15
The soon-to-be-released Linux 4.18.6 stable kernel will correctly report the CPU core temperatures of the new AMD Threadripper 2950X and 2990WX processors...

Red Hat Leftovers

tuxmachines.org - Sre, 08/29/2018 - 18:09

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Is the Linux 4.18 kernel heading your way?

tuxmachines.org - Sre, 08/29/2018 - 18:02

How soon the 4.18 kernel lands on your system or network depends a lot on which Linux distributions you use. It may be heading your way or you may already be using it.

If you have ever wondered whether the same kernel is used in all Linux distributions, the answer is that all Linux distributions use the same kernel more or less, but there are several big considerations that make that "more or less" quite significant.

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Compact, Arm-based mini-PC is toughened up for IIoT

tuxmachines.org - Sre, 08/29/2018 - 17:57

DFI’s Pico-ITX-based, DIN-rail mountable “EC900-FS6” mini-PC runs Linux or Android on an i.MX6 DualLite, and offers 2x GbE, 2x USB, 2x serial, mini-PCIe, and extensive ruggedization features.

A reader recently noted our excessive use of the term “rugged,” which is fair enough. In our defense, embedded gear is increasingly tolerant of wide temperature ranges, and to a lesser extent, excessive shock, vibration, and dust and water ingress. From now on, we will no longer use “rugged” to describe a system that has a wide temperature range without also offering other protections. We will, however, continue to apply it to systems like DFI’s i.MX6-based EC900-FS6 mini-PC, which is not only rugged, but quite compact at 143 x 96.4 x 34mm.

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bison-3.1 released

LWN.net - Sre, 08/29/2018 - 17:35
Version 3.1 of the Bison parser generator has been released. "It introduces new features such as typed midrule actions, brings improvements in the diagnostics, fixes several bugs and portability issues, improves the examples, and more".

Thanks To Microsoft & LTTng, It's Becoming Possible To Profile .NET Apps On Linux

Phoronix - Sre, 08/29/2018 - 17:28
While .NET applications have been supported on Linux for a while now via the .NET Core, using performance profiling tools really haven't working out but that is now changing...

Security updates for Wednesday

LWN.net - Sre, 08/29/2018 - 16:01
Security updates have been issued by CentOS (bind and postgresql), Debian (linux-4.9 and tomcat8), Red Hat (java-1.7.1-ibm and java-1.8.0-ibm), Slackware (kernel), SUSE (kernel and openssl1), and Ubuntu (linux-azure, linux-oem, linux-gcp and poppler).

The NVIDIA Jetson TX2 Performance Has Evolved Nicely Since Launch

Phoronix - Sre, 08/29/2018 - 14:38
Word this week of the NVIDIA Jetson Xavier Development Kit being up for pre-order reminded me of some benchmarks I had been meaning to do of seeing how the NVIDIA Jetson TX2 developer kit's performance has evolved since its launch a year and a half ago. There's actually a quite measurable improvement in performance with the latest software/drivers compared to it was at launch.

StarTech's Affordable Server Racks Continue Working Out Great - 2 More Racks Installed

Phoronix - Sre, 08/29/2018 - 13:08
For those looking at affordable metal server racks / open rack cabinets, I continue to be quite impressed by the StarTech.com four-post server racks. Recently I commissioned two more of their 12U racks in order to accommodate the latest Threadripper 2 systems in our Linux benchmarking farm...

An Activision Developer Is Talking At The Open-Source Summit... About Kafka Tuning

Phoronix - Sre, 08/29/2018 - 12:28
At this week's Open-Source Summit in Vancouver is a presentation by an Activision developer talking about Call of Duty performance but sadly it's not what may come to mind...

today's leftovers

tuxmachines.org - Sre, 08/29/2018 - 12:22
  • The Universim is now officially available in Early Access on Steam

    The Universim from developer Crytivo just entered Early Access today and as promised it does include the Linux build. It's been quite a long road to get here, with the Kickstarter being succesful all the way back in 2014 with nearly $400K.

    Note: Copy personally purchased a long time ago from their own store.

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  • Getting started with the i3 window manager on Linux

    In my article 5 reasons the i3 window manager makes Linux better, I shared the top five reasons I use and recommend the i3 window manager as an alternative Linux desktop experience.

    In this post, I will walk through the installation and basic configuration of i3 on Fedora 28 Linux.

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  • Calendar progress

    As we’re closing in on a simple but functional calendar for Kube, I’d like to share our progress with you.

    We’ve decided to start with a week view, as that seems to be a good compromise between information density and enough information for day-to-day use.
    We will eventually complement that with a month view, which is probably all we need for the time being.

  • Krita Comic Managemer: Improving the other exporters.

    There’s still more that can be done, like for example accessibility metadata entries, but for now I am pretty pleased with this.

    It is in master, so Krita 4.2 will carry the updated plugin!

  • Calibre 3.30.0 for Slackware with internal Qt5 libraries

    It took me quite a while to release a new package for Calibre, the e-book library manager. That had a reason.

    In July I switched the Qt5 package in my repositories to version 5.11 to support the latest KDE Plasma5 software and because it offers advantages over the previous 5.9 releases. Unfortunately, as I found out soon afterwards, the Calibre software fails to work with Qt 5.11 – its GUI components were not built and there was no obvious error to explain why.

    Therefore I had to re-visit the calibre.SlackBuild‘s internals and try to revive the internal functions that compile an embedded Qt library set. This was last tested in the early days of my Calibre packages when Qt4 was the running champion. Adding internal Qt5 support was quite a different beast. Qt5 is a lot bigger than the venerable Qt4 so the build process needed some pruning to keep the compilation times acceptable and the package size under control.

  • Securing apps and services with Keycloak (Watch DevNation Live video)

    The video from the last DevNation Live: Securing apps and services with Keycloak is now available to watch online. In this session, you will learn how to secure web/HTML5 applications, single-page and mobile applications, and services with Keycloak. Keycloak can be used to secure traditional monolithic applications as well as microservices and service mesh-based applications that need secure end-to-end authentication for all front- and back-end services. The examples in the video cover PHP, Node.js, and HTML/JavaScript.

    Securing applications and services is no longer just about assigning a username and password. You need to manage identities. You need to integrate with legacy and external authentication systems to provide features that are in demand like social logins and single sign-on (SSO). Your list of other requirements may be long. But you don’t want to develop all of this yourself, nor should you.

  • Breaking the legacy virtualization cycle: How Red Hat and our partners are transforming IT through open source

    Across nearly every industry, organizations of all shapes and sizes are embracing digital transformation in an effort to modernize their IT departments. They want to deliver better, faster and more dynamic services to customers -- and they’re starting from their infrastructure, up. But for companies locked into legacy technologies, transformation isn’t always an option.

    Organizations with proprietary virtualization solutions know all too well how this technology can stifle enterprise IT innovation and advancement. For many, the cost of simply maintaining existing infrastructure investments ties up an overwhelming majority of budgets, leaving little room to invest in new technologies, and the closed vendor ecosystem can make integrating and adopting cloud-native solutions based on Kubernetes and Linux containers nearly impossible.

  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 28 August 2018

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team. If you would like to reach the server team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-server channel on Freenode. Alternatively, you can sign up and use the Ubuntu Server Team mailing list.

  • Rugged telematics fleet computer ready to be dinked and dunked

    Nexcom’s compact, IP67 protected “VTC 1911-IPK Telematics IoT Gateway” runs on a Bay Trail Atom and offers CAN 2.0B, dual mini-PCIe and SIM slots, GPS, 2x GbE, SATA, and more. It’s resistant to shock, vibration, humidity, and -40 to 70°C temperatures.

    With flooding and sea-level rise on the rise due to climate change, there will no doubt be a lot more trucks and other heavy equipment sloshing around in the muck. The Nexcom VTC 1911-IPK Telematics IoT Gateway is ready to get wet and bumpy with the help of IP67 water and dustproofing, -40 to 70°C support, and shock, vibration, and humidity resistance. This wireless-enabled in-vehicle computer is designed for construction site management and heavy-duty vehicle fleet management working in chemical plants, construction sites, and waterfront venues.

  • IGEL Positioned to Capitalize on Fast-Growing Demand for Linux at the Endpoint

    IGEL, a world leader in endpoint management software for the secure enterprise, today announced findings from the new IDC InfoBrief, "Linux and the Thin Client Management Market." In the IDC InfoBrief, sponsored by IGEL, IDC reveals findings on the key factors driving thin client adoption growth and propelling endpoint device expansion. In addition, IDC shows findings that endpoint Linux operating system (OS) shipment shares are shifting at a global level, distinctly outpacing all other OSs.

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  • Phones as Old As Moto G Can Now Download Android P, Full List of Devices Inside

    Android P is currently a hotly anticipated software update among Android users. However, the software update is not officially available on devices other than Pixel – Pixel/Pixel XL and Pixel 2/Pixel 2 XL. However, wouldn’t like to download it right now and try it out?

  • Google improves AI model training by open-sourcing framework
  • AI: Google releases open source framework for reinforcement learning
  • An Introduction to Quantum Computing with Open Source Cirq Framework

    As the title suggests what we are about to begin discussing, this article is an effort to understand how far we have come in Quantum Computing and where we are headed in the field in order to accelerate scientific and technological research, through an Open Source perspective with Cirq.

    First, we will introduce you to the world of Quantum Computing. We will try our best to explain the basic idea behind the same before we look into how Cirq would be playing a significant role in the future of Quantum Computing. Cirq, as you might have heard of recently, has been breaking news in the field and in this Open Science article, we will try to find out why.

    [...]

    It will be easier for us to understand Quantum Computing by comparing it first to Classical Computing. Classical Computing refers to how today’s conventional computers are designed to work. The device with which you are reading this article right now, can also be referred to as a Classical Computing Device.

  • Debian Policy call for participation -- August 2018

    Here’s a summary of some of the bugs against the Debian Policy Manual. Please consider getting involved, whether or not you’re an existing contributor.

  • Reports from Netdev 0x12

    The Netdev 0x12 networking conference was held in mid-July. Participants at the event have put together a set of reports of the talks that were held on the last two days; Day 2 includes eleven talks, including the keynote by Van Jacobson, while Day 3 covers another ten topics.

  • Netdev day 3

    In this talk Tushar Dave presents his work on using eBPF for Reliable Datagram Socket (RDS) filtering. Tushar started his talk by explaining that RDS is a high performance, low latency connectionless protocol that sits on top of TCP (sk_buff) and IB (scatterlist) transport layers.

    The problem Tushar tried to solve was to implement RDS filtering and firewall to do DPI of a full RDS packet in a unified solution for both TCP and IB. Netfilter is a possibility but Netfilter only uses sk_buff. An alternative is eBPF which has been adopted into the Linux kernel and used for a lot of things.

    In order to use eBPF as it was, Tushar had to add a new BPF prog type (similar to socket filter) that deals with scatterlist. In addition he had to create a new function to setup needed data structures to run filter program attached to the socket. As POC Tushar created a BPF helper to help users to traverse the sg elements in the scatterlist.

  • Netdev 2018 day 2

    The first of these saved us until ~1995, then the second and third until ~2012. Since then the problem has been increasing. Dennard's scaling stopped. Usually, the switch's speed was faster than the host speed. CPU upgrades cannot solve network problems anymore. This had a big impact on the network. Google has been working to try and address some of these issues; Van mentioned several Google authored papers: - Hull, BwE, FQ/pacing, Timely, BBR, Carousel. All these papers tried to figure out how to find the bottleneck link downstream and prevent pressure in downstream buffers. BwE discussed how to fix things at the host to prevent queue buildup in switches. FQ/pacing was about desire to prevent many packets traveling to the same destinations in bursts.

    Van argued that AFAP isn't working for us now because it's local to the host and our problems aren't local. We need a mechanism that allows for more control of packet spacing on the wire. To enforce relationships between all outgoing packets, the enforcement mechanism needs to be just in front of the NIC. Carousel is a great example of this.

  • Chrome’s New Tab Page is Finally Customizable

    Google is giving Chrome users a more configurable "new tab" page to play with, with options to add custom links and set a custom background image.

  • OBSD.ams : The setup

    For all the people who want to know what our setup looks like. Below is a write-up of our setup and configuration. There aren't any packages installed on the servers running the Virtual Machines.

  • bison-3.1 released [stable]

    We are very happy to announce the release of GNU Bison 3.1. It introduces new features such as typed midrule actions, brings improvements in the diagnostics, fixes several bugs and portability issues, improves the examples, and more.

  • Add GUIs to your programs and scripts easily with PySimpleGUI

    Few people run Python programs by double-clicking the .py file as if it were a .exe file. When a typical user (non-programmer types) double-clicks an .exe file, they expect it to pop open with a window they can interact with. While GUIs, using tkinter, are possible using standard Python installations, it's unlikely many programs do this.

    What if it were so easy to open a Python program into a GUI that complete beginners could do it? Would anyone care? Would anyone use it? It's difficult to answer because to date it's not been easy to build a custom GUI.

    There seems to be a gap in the ability to add a GUI onto a Python program/script. Complete beginners are left using only the command line and many advanced programmers don't want to take the time required to code up a tkinter GUI.

  • Containers in Perl 6

    In the first article in this series comparing Perl 5 to Perl 6, we looked into some of the issues you might encounter when migrating code into Perl 6. In the second article, we examined how garbage collection works in Perl 6. Here, in the third article, we'll focus on Perl 5's references and how they're handled in Perl 6, and introduce the concepts of binding and containers.

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Security Leftovers

tuxmachines.org - Sre, 08/29/2018 - 12:21
  • Security reviews and microservices

    Humans don’t scale, not even linearly. In fact adding more humans probably results in worse performance. If you need to review a thousand services you will need an incredible number of people, and anytime people are involved there are going to be a lot of mistakes made. There is no secret option three where we just staff up to get this done. Staffing up probably just means you now have two problems instead of one.

    Automation is the only plausible solution.

  • WhatsApp Vulnerable to Memory Corruption and DoS Crash with Crafted Message in v2.18.61

    WhatsApp is not new to memory corruption vulnerabilities. After a series of infamous and chronically frustrating special character message circulations which would cause the application to crash fiercely until the troublesome message was deleted (note that deleting the message was a feat immensely difficult to accomplish as the application would crash repeatedly and not launch properly in the first place to allow you to delete the message), there is now another such crafted message which is lending itself to a memory corruption vulnerability in the popular instant messaging social media platform.

    The new-found Memory corruption vulnerability has been found to affect the iPhones 5, 6s, and X with iOS 10 and 11.4.1 which was the latest iOS version when the tests were conducted. The vulnerability exists in WhatsApp’s versions 2.18.61 and older on these platforms.

  • Intel To Develop Safety-Critical Linux OS Distribution

    Imad Sousou of Intel's Open-Source Technology Center has announced their plans to develop a safety-critical Linux distribution. This Linux distribution will be geared for running on safety-compliant solutions from autonomous vehicles to drones and more.

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Graphics: GPUOpen, EGMDE, Vega, VKMS, Direct3D, Vulkan VirGL

tuxmachines.org - Sre, 08/29/2018 - 11:56
  • GPUOpen's Vulkan Memory Allocator 2.1 Being Prepped With Many Additions

    AMD's GPUOpen group has released their first beta of the Vulkan Memory Allocator 2.1 release after "many months of development" and as such comes with many new features.

    VulkanMemoryAllocator as a refresher is the open-source AMD effort to provide an easy-to-use and integrate Vulkan memory allocation library to ease the process of bringing up new Vulkan code. The VulkanMemoryAllocator is used by the likes of Google's Filament renderer, vkDoom3, LWJGL, the Anvil framework, and others.

  • Mir's EGMDE "Edge" Now Has Experimental X11 Support, Static Display Configuration

    Ubuntu's Mir display server that has been chasing Wayland support and earlier this year introduced EGMDE as the example Mir desktop environment has picked up some extra functionality on its "edge" channel.

    Thanks to Ubuntu's Snappy, via Snap it's now possible to have both beta and edge channels of EGMDE with easy installation. Their edge channel of EGMDE will be where they ship their experimental/bleeding-edge features. In making use of this new functionality, to the EGMDE edge channel they have introduced some new capabilities.

  • More Vega 20 Enablement Heading To Linux 4.20~5.0, No Longer Marked Experimental

    While the Linux 4.19 kernel merge window just ended this past weekend and the development cycle for Linux 4.20 (or most likely to be called Linux 5.0) won't kick off until around the middle of October, AMD has already begun staging a ton of changes for this next kernel version. In particular, it looks like with this next kernel release their Vega 20 enablement will be in order.

  • The DRM GPU Scheduler Got Beefed Up This Summer, More Improvements Possible

    In addition to the VKMS driver for virtual kernel mode-setting, the other successful Google Summer of Code (GSoC) project this summer under the X.Org umbrella was improving the DRM GPU scheduler.

    The DRM GPU scheduler is what was the AMDGPU scheduler before it was punted out into DRM common code so this GPU scheduler could be re-used by other Direct Rendering Manager drivers like Etnaviv and Linux-Lima. As part of GSoC 2018, Nayan Deshmukh worked on improvements to the DRM GPU scheduler with a particular focus on being able to feed one entity into multiple run queues.

  • wineSHOCK: The Automated Direct3D Game Benchmarks On Wine

    Given Valve's now public Steam Play for Linux using the Wine-derived Proton and their ongoing relationship with Code Weavers to improve the experience for Windows games on Linux, it perhaps adds better context why this summer for GSoC there was the automated Direct3D game benchmarking work with mentorship by a CodeWeavers developer.

    This summer we've been covering the work by student developer Dimitris Gounaridis on better Direct3D game benchmarks within Wine. After all, this Google Summer of Code project is facilitated using the Phoronix Test Suite and OpenBenchmarking.org.

  • Vulkan VirGL Ends The Summer Being Able To Execute A Compute Shader

    One of the most interesting projects we've seen attempted for Google Summer of Code 2018 was adding Vulkan support to VirGL for allowing Vulkan access within guest virtual machines.

    The VirGL stack has been getting into great shape with its OpenGL 4 support while up until this summer there wasn't much effort on getting the Vulkan graphics/compute API handled by this stack that leverages Mesa, VirtIO-GPU, and the "virglrenderer" component to make all of this magic happen.

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Trust in Linux: Realtek/Blobs, Questionable Entropy (RDRAND), More Intel Defects

tuxmachines.org - Sre, 08/29/2018 - 11:48
  • Realtek USB3 Hubs Will See Firmware Updates Delivered On Linux Via Fwupd/LVFS

    Linux firmware updating is on a roll with the fwupd updating utility and the Linux Vendor Firmware Service (LVFS) for the distribution of these firmware files recently seeing AKiTiO Thunderbolt device support and NVMe SSD firmware updating being the next big task. Richard Hughes of Red Hat has also revealed he's been working on USB3 hub firmware support in conjunction with Realtek.

  • Linux 4.19 lets you declare your trust in AMD, IBM and Intel

    Linux v4.19-rc1, release candidate code published on Sunday, allows those building their own kernel or Linux distribution to choose whether or not to trust the CPU hardware random number generator, a decision that has become complicated in the wake of the revelations about government surveillance over the past five years.

    When random number generation is insufficiently random, encryption based on such numbers can be broken with less effort. Among the security-minded, there's concern that hardware makers might offer subpar randomization unknowingly, as a result of espionage, or to accommodate demands from government law enforcement or intelligence agencies.

    The paranoia wasn't always so palpable. Back in 2013, Linus Torvalds, Lord of the Linux, dismissed calls to ditch Intel's RDRAND processor instruction, noting that the Linux kernel uses multiple sources of input to generate random numbers.

  • Intel's 13 Patches For SGX Linux Support See Their 13th Revision

    One of the features sadly not making it into the in-development Linux 4.19 kernel is the support for Intel's SGX -- the Software Guard Extensions.

    Intel Software Guard Extensions allow for allocating "enclaves" or private regions of memory for secure computing, DRM, and other purposes. SGX support was introduced to Intel CPUs with Skylake while the Linux support has remained a work-in-progress.

  • Bug in Linux 4.18 Kernel Causes CPU Stall and System Freezes on Older Hardware

    If ever you needed a good reason to upgrade your old CPU, it seems a “show-stopping” bug has found its way into the Linux 4.18 stable kernel series – though its only effecting older hardware, mostly the Intel Core 2 Duo era processors. This bug in Linux 4.18 kernel currently has two submitted bug reports on the bugzilla tracker.

  • Linux 4.18 Is Appearing To Cause Problems For Those Running Older CPUs

    As a P.S.A. for those tending to quickly upgrade to new major kernel releases but are doing so on older hardware, there appears to be a show-stopping bug that made it into the stable Linux 4.18 series.

    [...]

    Those encountering this problem have bisected it to clocksource: Remove kthread as the problematic commit. If building the Linux 4.18 kernel with that commit reverted, those old CPUs begin to happily run on this latest stable kernel release. Another alternative to workaround this problem is booting with the kernel parameter of clocksource=hpet. Of course, if you are running on a system as old as the Core 2 Duo days (2006~2010), you can choose any number of older stable Linux LTS releases to boot your system until this situation is resolved upstream and back-ported to the 4.18 series.

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Oracle Solaris 11.4

tuxmachines.org - Sre, 08/29/2018 - 11:18
  • Oracle Solaris 11.4 Released for General Availability

    I'm pleased to announce the release of Oracle Solaris 11.4. Of the four releases of Oracle Solaris that I've been involved in, this is the best one yet!

    Oracle Solaris is the trusted business platform that you depend on. Oracle Solaris 11 gives you consistent compatibility, is simple to use and is designed to always be secure.

  • Solaris 11.4 released

    Congrats to my colleagues in the Solaris team who released Solaris 11.4 today. Despite the 11.x moniker, this is actually a major Solaris release; Oracle has just decided to go down the perpetual macOS X / Windows 10 version numbering route from now on. (This development is unlikely to faze Solaris veterans, who have been using SunOS 5.x since 1992.)

  • Oracle Solaris 11.4 Officially Released

    Two years after Solaris 11.3 and Oracle opting for a "continuous delivery" model of 11.next updates instead of a "Solaris 12", Solaris 11.4 is out the door today.

    Oracle is talking up Solaris 11.4 with its general availability release as "the trusted business platform", "consistent compatibility, is simple to use and is designed to always be secure", "more than 3,000 applications certified to run on it", and "the only operating system that has completed UNIX V7 certification."

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