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Debian GNU/Linux riscv64 port in mid 2019

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 03:37

As it can be seen in the first graph, perhaps with some difficulty, is that the percent of arch-dependent packages built for riscv64 (grey line) has been around or higher than 80% since mid 2018, just a few months after the port was added to the infrastructure.

Given than the arch-dependent packages are about half of the Debian['s main, unstable] archive and that (in simple terms) arch-independent packages can be used by all ports (provided that the software that they rely on is present, e.g. a programming language interpreter), this means that around 90% of packages of the whole archive has been available for this architecture from early on.

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Latest Security FUD

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 03:17

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Software: Synapse, Qmmp and LibreOffice

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 03:16
  • How to install and use Synapse, the MacOS Spotlight alternative for Linux

    Mac OS is everybody’s favorite, and there are several reasons behind it. One of the most useful utilities you can find on Mac OS is Spotlight, which makes searching for things a piece of cake, all directly from the desktop. While most developers have already designed similar utilities for Windows, the open-source Linux based operating systems are no exception, as well. Most Linux operating systems like Ubuntu have its own search functionality, but it can sometimes be troublesome to reach there and isn’t as powerful as Spotlight. So with Synapse for Linux, you can do just that, and boost the power of the search functionality on your system.

    With Synapse for Ubuntu, you can even search for things on the web, which is cool, as well. Some Linux distros like Lubuntu, don’t offer decent search functionality, and Synapse can be a great solution in such cases. With Synapse, searching is easy with just the navigation buttons on your keyboard, and you are ready to go. Synapse can be downloaded and installed from the Linux official repository. Synapse can also be configured to run on startup so that too don’t need to search for, and open Synapse, each time you need to use it.

  • Qmmp 1.3.3 Released with Floating PulseAudio, ALSA, OSS4 Support

    Qmmp, Qt based audio player, released version 1.3.3 with improvements and bug fixes. Here’s how to install it in Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu 18.10, Ubuntu 19.04.

  • Office Suites for Ubuntu 18.04

    Today we are looking at different office suites for Ubuntu 18.04. LibreOffice is the default LibreOffice suite for Ubuntu but it is by all means not the only one. In this article, we will look at different office suites for Ubuntu and all of its pros and cons.

    All these Office Suites are available for at least all Ubuntu based distros, and the installation method is the same for all the Ubuntu based distros.

  • Week 3 Report

    I continue working on Rewriting the logger messages with the new DSL grammar:

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Lenovo ThinkPad P Laptops Are Available with Ubuntu

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 03:13

Dell may be the best-known Linux laptop vendor right now, but Lenovo is looking to muscle in on the pre-installed Linux machine market.

All of Lenovo’s refreshed ThinkPad P series laptops will be available to buy with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS preinstalled when they go on sale in the US later this month.

Oddly, Lenovo doesn’t mention Linux availability in their press release introducing the new ThinkPad P series laptops, but eagle-eyed Linux users spotted the additional OS option on when investigating the laptop’s ‘tech specs’ on the Lenovo website.

The company says its refreshed P-series ‘portfolio’ is “…is designed to meet the ever-changing power and portability needs of modern professionals across industries – both in the office and beyond without sacrificing our legendary engineering know-how, reliability and security.”

Also: How to install Lubuntu Linux OS on PC via USB stick/drive

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Move to pay Debian devs for project work rears its head again

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 03:09

The idea of paying developers to work on Debian GNU/Linux packages has reared its head again, with senior developer Raphael Hertzog proposing that project funds be used for the purpose.

Hertzog made the suggestion in a reply to a post on one of the project's mailing lists which was part of a thread on the subject "Why do we take so long to realise good ideas?"

"Use the $300,000 on our bank accounts?", he wrote, adding that he had heard of another US$300,000 donation made by Google to the project though he was unable to find any publicly accessible reference to it.

The idea of paying developers for their work on what is a community project was raised 13 years ago by former project leader Anthony Towns, with the reason being the speeding up of development so that releases could take place sooner. The idea did not prove very popular as it was meant to be run outside the project proper and was meant to pay core members for their work.

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GNOME 3.34’s Sleek New Desktop Background

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 03:05

The upcoming GNOME 3.34 release is sure to ship with a stack of improvements, new features and core app updates — but it will also come with a brand new default wallpaper!

GNOME designer Jakub Steiner is, once again, diligently designing a new desktop drape for the revered free desktop to use by default.

And although the intended design is not final-final, it’s almost done! So here’s your first look at the brand new GNOME 3.34 wallpaper...

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Compilers: GCC 10 and LLVM Clang 9.0

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 02:42
  • GCC 10 Lands Support For Targeting TI's 32-bit PRU Processor

    New to the GCC 10 compiler code-base this week is a port for the Texas Instruments Programmable Real-Time Unit (PRU) processor found on various boards, including the likes of the BeagleBone Arm SBCs.

    The TI programmable real-time unit (PRU) is a processor on some TI boards that offers two 32-bit cores running at 200MHz. The PRU offers single-cycle I/O access and full access to the system's internal memory and peripherals. Texas Instruments has offered a proprietary toolchain for writing Assembly code to run on the PRU while now an independent developer has landed the GCC port for targeting this unique processor.

  • Clang-Scan-Deps Lands In Clang 9.0 For Much Faster Dependency Scanning

    Landing this week in the LLVM Clang 9.0 development code-base is the new clang-scan-deps tool for much faster scanning of files for dependencies compared to the traditional pre-processor based approach.

    Development of clang-scan-deps was led by Apple's compiler team and delivers up to around ten (10) times faster performance for scanning of dependencies/modules before compiling compared to the pre-processor-based scanning.

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Information stalls at Linux Week and Veganmania in Vienna

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 02:40

The information stall at the Linux weeks event in May was somewhat limited due to the fact that we didn’t get our usual posters and the roll-up in time. Unfortunately we discovered too late that they had obviously been lent out for an other event and hadn’t been returned afterwards. So we could only use our information material. But since at this event the FSFE is very well known, it wasn’t hard at all to carry out our usual information stall. It’s less about outreach work and more of a who-is-who of the free software community in Vienna anyway. For three days we met old friends and networked. Of course some newbies found their way to the event also. And therefore we could spread our messages a little further too.

In addition, we once again provided well visited workshops for Inkscape and Gimp. The little talk on the free rally game Trigger Rally even motivated an attending dedicated Fedora maintainer to create an up-to-date .rpm package in order to enable distribution of the most recent release to rpm distros.

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Audiocasts/Shows: SoftIron, Going Linux, Open Source Security Podcast, This Week in Linux

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 02:37
  • Building Ceph As Linux Of Storage: SoftIron Founder Phil Straw

    During Kubecon + CloudNativeCon in Barcelona TFIR Publisher & Editor, Swapnil Bhartiya sat down with Phil Straw, founder and CTO of SoftIron.

    SoftIron has built server appliances based on Ceph open source project. Their goal is to obstruct everything (hardware and software) and enable users to simply reap the benefits of Ceph.

  • Going Linux #370 · Run your business on Linux - Part 4

    After we discuss Bill's latest adventure in distro hopping, we continue our series on Linux applications for running a business. This time, the we are discussing the business of being a writer. From applications to word processors to desktop publishing and graphic creation, Linux has applications for it all.

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 150 - Our ad funded dystopian present

    Josh and Kurt talk about the future Chrome and ad blockers. There is a lot of nuance to unpack around this one. There are two versions of the Internet today. One with an ad blocker and one without. The Internet without an ad blocker is a dystopian nightmare. The actionable advice at the end of this one is to use Firefox.

  • Episode 70 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we’ve got a jam packed episode with new releases of applications and distros, new hardware, new games coming, and so much more. KDE announced the release of Plasma 5.16. AMD wasn’t finished yet, they announced new CPUs and GPU hardware at Computex. Matrix.org announced the milestone release of Matrix 1.0 and the Matrix.org Foundation. We also saw some releases from OBS, PeerTube, LMMS, and more. In Distro News, we’ll check out Crux, Endless OS and Enso OS. We got some interesting news from the Pine64 team about the PinePhone and then we’ll round out the show with some Linux Gaming News from Steam, Atari and a skateboarding birds game on Kickstarter. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

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Enviro+ Is A Raspberry Pi Accessory To Monitor Air Quality

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 02:35

There are many Raspberry Pi accessories available in the market but there are very few boards that are as cool and useful as Enviro+.

Developed by Pimoroni in collaboration with the researchers from the University of Sheffield, it is a board with a couple of environmental sensors and a small LCD display for monitoring data.

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EndeavourOS Is Hoping To Be The Successor To Antergos - Convenient To Use Arch Linux

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 02:32

Details are light up to this point but in fifteen days EndeavourOS will be announced as a new Arch-based Linux distribution aiming to continue where Antergos Linux left off.

For those that missed it, last month the Antergos Linux developers discontinued their OS due to a lack of time to devote to their open-source project. There's now a new development team spearheading work on a new initiative called "EndeavourOS" that hopes to be its spiritual successor.

Also new: Yes, It's that time again! Kwort 4.3.4 is out

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Review: OS108 and Venom Linux

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 02:29

Every so often I like to step outside of the distributions I know, the ones I tend to see and use year after year, and try something different. Sometimes trying a new project introduces me to a new way of doing things, as Bedrock Linux did earlier this year. Other times trying a project that is just getting started is a reminder of just how much infrastructure, time and resources go into the big-name projects. At any rate, this week I want to talk about two young projects that grabbed my attention for different reasons.

The first is OS108, which caught my eye because it is a desktop flavour of BSD, which is relatively rare. Specifically, the base operating system is NetBSD. OS108 reportedly wants to be a replacement for Windows and macOS and features the MATE desktop environment. The website did not offer much more information than that. I was able to learn OS108 is available for 64-bit (x86_64) machines only, which I suspect undercuts the usefulness of having a highly portable operating system, such as NetBSD, as the base.

The ISO file I downloaded for OS108 was 1.5GB in size. The file had no version number associated with it, so I assume this is the project's first release. The project's download page says we should install OS108 just as if it were regular NetBSD, then run a script to set up the MATE desktop. Optionally, there is another set of instructions we can follow to set up wireless networking.

Booting from the OS108 media brings up an installer which guides us through a series of text-based menus. We are asked to select our keyboard layout, choose whether to install a fresh copy of the operating system or upgrade, and then select which hard drive will hold OS108. We are also asked to confirm our hard drive's geometry and whether we want to manually partition the disk or let OS108 take over the whole drive. The installer recommends we set aside at least 5GB of space on the drive. Personally, I found more space was required as the default package selection, including the MATE desktop, consumes about 6GB of disk space.

We are next asked if we want a full install, a mostly full install without the X.Org display software, a minimal install, or a custom selection of packages. I went with the full option since it was the default. We can then select where the source packages are located (on the DVD, in this case) and the packages are quickly copied over to the hard drive. A minute later I was asked to perform more configuration steps. These included enabling networking, setting a root password, and turning on optional network services from a list of daemons. We can also create a regular user account and optionally download the pkgsrc ports framework. I skipped installing pkgsrc.

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Differences between Four Linux Mint Editions

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 02:26

If you look at the web, it's rare to find a resource to explain the differences between all 4 Linux Mint editions (Cinnamon, MATE, XFCE, and Debian). If you are looking for such explanation, then this brief article is for you. I hope you will find edition you love the most from GNU/Linux Mint.

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PCLinuxOS KDE Full Edition 2019.06 Release

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 02:11

Kernel 5.1.10
KDE Applications 19.04.2
KDE Frameworks 5.59.0
KDE Plasma 5.16.0

This ISO comes with the standard compliment of KDE applications plus LibreOffice.

Also new: Linspire 8.0 Maintenance Release 1 RELEASED

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Plasma/KDE Usability & Productivity, KDE Frameworks 5.60 Bringing More Baloo Optimizations, KMyMoney and Konsole Updates

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 01:52
  • KDE Usability & Productivity: Week 75

    Week 75 in KDE’s Usability & Productivity initiative is here! It’s a little lighter than usual because we’re all feverishly preparing for the dual Plasma and Usability & Productivity sprints nest week in Valencia, Spain. I’ll be there, as well as the whole Plasma team, a bunch of VDG people, and a number of folks who have stepped up to work on apps for the U&P initiative. Sprints like these promise the kind of face-to-face contact needed for big projects, and should be a fantastically awesome and productive time! I’d like to offer a special thanks to Slimbook (makers of the KDE Slimbook II laptop) for hosting the sprint!

  • KDE Frameworks 5.60 Bringing More Baloo Optimizations

    Making KDE's Baloo file indexing/searching framework really efficient appears to be a never-ending task. Baloo is already much less bloated recently than it's been hungry for resources in the past and with KDE Frameworks 5.60 will be slightly more fit.

    Baloo's indexing process with KDE Frameworks 5.60 will now pay attention to when extended attributes on folders change, no longer does unnecessary work when a folder is renamed, is faster now at un-indexing files, and is less intensive running on laptops with battery power. All of these Baloo improvements will be in the next KDE Frameworks monthly update.

  • International number formats

    KMyMoney as a financial application deals with numbers a lot. As a KDE application, it supports internationalization (or i18n for short) from the very beginning. For accuracy reasons it has internal checks to verify the numbers a user can enter.

    The validation routine has a long history (I think it goes back to the KDE3 days) and we recently streamlined it a bit as part of the journey to use more and more Qt standard widgets instead of our own.

    This led to the replacement of the KMyMoneyEdit widget with the newer AmountEdit widget. Everything worked great for me (using a German locale) until we received notifications that users could only enter integer numbers but no fractional part. This of course is not what we wanted. But why is that?

    The important piece of information was that the user reporting the issue uses the Finland svenska (sv_FI) locale on his system. So I set my development system to use that locale for numbers and currencies and it failed for me as well. So it was pretty clear that the validation logic had a flaw.

    Checking the AmountValidator object which is an extension of the QDoubleValidator I found out that it did not work as expected with the said locale. So it was time to setup some testcases for the validator to see how it performs with other locales. I still saw it failing which made me curious so I dug into the Qt source code one more time, specifically the QDoubleValidator. Well, it looked that most of the logic we added in former times is superfluous meanwhile with the Qt5 version. But there remains a little difference: the QDoubleValidator works on the symbols of the LC_NUMERIC category of a locale where we want to use it the LC_MONETARY version. So what to do? Simply ignore the fact? This could bite us later.

  • The state of Terminal Emulators in Linux

    Now it has more developers and more code flowing, fixing bugs, improving the interface, increasing the number of lines of code flowing thru the codebase. We don’t plan to stop supporting konsole, and it will not depend on a single developer anymore.

    We want konsole to be the swiss army knife of terminal emulators, you can already do with konsole a lot of things that are impossible in other terminals, but we want more. And we need more developers for that.

    Konsole is, together with VTE, the most used terminal out there in numbers of applications that integrate the technology: Dolphin, Kate, KDevelop, Yakuake, and many other applications also use konsole, so fixing a bug in one place we are helping a lot of other applications too.

    Consider joining a project, Consider sending code.

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KBibTeX 0.9 released

tuxmachines.org - Pon, 06/17/2019 - 01:43

Finally, KBibTeX 0.9 got released. Virtually nothing has changed since the release of beta 2 in May as no specific bugs have been reported. Thus ChangeLog is still the same and the details on the changes since 0.8.2 as shown on the release announcement for 0.9-beta2.

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Kernel prepatch 5.2-rc5

LWN.net - Ned, 06/16/2019 - 23:54
The 5.2-rc5 kernel prepatch is out for testing. "But the good news is that we're getting to the later parts of the rc series, and things do seem to be calming down. I was hoping rc5 would end up smaller than rc4, and so it turned out."

Linux 5.2-rc5

tuxmachines.org - Ned, 06/16/2019 - 22:15

"It's Sunday afternoon somewhere in the world".

In fact, it's _barely_ Sunday afternoon back home, where I'll be later
today. But not quite yet, and I continue my slightly flaky release
schedule due to my normal release time being spent on an airplane once
again.

In fact, that will happen the _next_ two weekends too due to yet more
travel. So the releases will not be quite the clockwork they usually
are.

But the good news is that we're getting to the later parts of the rc
series, and things do seem to be calming down. I was hoping rc5 would
end up smaller than rc4, and so it turned out. There's some pending
stuff still, but it all looks quite small and nothing seems to be
particularly scary-looking.

And this time around we don't even have any huge SPDX updates, so the
diffstat looks nice and small and clean too. Normal changes all over
(with drivers being the bulk of it as it should be: sound stands out,
but there's gpu, HID, USB, block.. ). Outside of driver fixes there's
the usual noise all ov

Also: Linux 5.2-rc5 Released As The End Of The Cycle Is A Few Weeks Away

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