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OSS Leftovers

tuxmachines.org - Sob, 10/13/2018 - 12:42
  • Dropping commercial open source lowers PaaS costs at Fidelity [Ed:  Cliff Saran still cannot tell the difference between "commercial" and "proprietary"]

    Fidelity International has made considerable savings by switching from a commercially supported distribution of Cloud Foundry to the free open source version.

  • Guarda makes available 15 open-source mobile crypto wallets

    Guarda, a custody free blockchain asset security and technology company today announced that it has made available now on GitHub 15 open-source cryptocurrency mobile Android SPV wallets for your disposal.

  • source{d} Engine: A Simple, Elegant Way to Analyze your Code

    From minute one, using source{d} Engine was an easy, efficient process. I ran source{d} Engine chiefly on a virtual machine running Ubuntu 14.04 but also installed it on MacOS and Ubuntu 16.04 for comparison purposes. On all three, install was completely painless, although the Ubuntu versions seemed to run slightly faster. The source{d} Engine documentation is accurate and thorough. It correctly warned me that the first time initializing the engine would take a fair amount of time so I was prepared for the wait. I did have to debug a few errors, all relating to my having a previous SQL instance running so some more thorough troubleshooting documentation might be warranted.

  • The Things Gateway - It's All About The Timing

    In my last posting, I talked about creating an External Rule System for the Things Gateway from Mozilla. This is a key component of the Automation part of a Smart Home system. Of course, the Things Gateway already has a rule system of its own. However, because it is GUI based, it has a complexity ceiling that is rather low by the standards of programmers.

    My External Rule System provides an alternative for more sophisticated rules that leverage the full power and readability of the Python programming language. However, I must ensure the capabilities are a proper superset of the built in Thing Gateway capabilities. The built in GUI Rule System has a special object called the "Clock" that can trigger a rule every day at a specific time. This is for the classic "turn the porch light on in the evening" home automation idea. My External Rule System needs the same capabilities, but as you'll see, it is easy to extend beyond basic time of day idea.

  • How OpenStack Barbican deployment options secure your cloud

    your internal information security policy or trying to meet regulatory requirements such as GDPR, ANSSI, PCI DSS, HIPAA, or NIST, you are likely looking for ways to protect the privacy and integrity of your data and software. That solution can be found in encryption. OpenStack provides all the ingredients necessary to deploy privacy and integrity solutions, but it is up to the operator to deploy them securely. This requires a key-management solution (KMS) to manage and protect the encryption keys.

    Barbican is the OpenStack service that allows operators and users to manage and store secrets securely. It consists of an OpenStack API that provides keystone authentication, oslo.policy and quotas, and backends where the secret is stored. But secrets are only as secure as the storage backend deployed behind Barbican. This article will discuss Barbican deployment options and explore how each affects the security of your cloud.

  • From hype to action: Next steps for edge computing

    Edge computing has gradually climbed the hype curve over the last couple of years, and it now stands at the center of why we do new things and launch new technologies. Why is it so important, what does it mean, where is the money behind the movement, and what does it mean to you? These are all good questions, and there is no simple answer to any of them.

    Edge is what happens when we start to look at how we take advantage of all the computing capacity across networks and enterprises—the same way cloud has done in a data center—as a real problem to be solved.

  • Tips for DBAs Managing Open Source Databases

    Companies are now managing a variety of open source and non-relational databases alongside relational databases like SQL Server and Oracle.

    While managing these systems involve the same set of challenges most DBAs are used to: ensuring availability, diagnosing performance problems and managing capacity, just to name a few, each database platform has its own set of processes and workflows for collecting and analyzing information.

  • The completion of Sonali's Outreachy internship work on the Free Software Directory

    I spent the last several weeks of my internship completing the upgrade and improvements to the directory.

    For context, see the previous blog post, Sonali's Internship work on the Free Software Directory, part 2

    After much work, I finally completed the upgrade of the Directory from the previous long term support version of MediaWiki, 1.27, to the current one, 1.31, which was released shortly after my internship started. I also made some general improvements.

  • Illinois Tech School of Applied Technology to Host Richard Stallman

    Illinois Tech’s School of Applied Technology will host Richard Stallman, activist and founder of the Free Software Foundation, on Monday, October 15 at 7 p.m. in Hermann Hall Auditorium. He will discuss the topic of freedom and privacy from computing. This event is open to the public at no charge.

  • DGSE ready to contribute to open source software
  • Open source pharma: How to stop the rot in drug discovery

    Here's the case for a more caring, sharing pharmaceutical industry — one that works with academia, and other public bodies, in the public interest to discover the medicinal drugs and vaccines our global society urgently needs. And not just for the interests of shareholders.

    It's a model for open source pharma — an alternative way of funding and working in drug discovery.

    For some it's a naive idea, for others it's the only way forward, and has been for some time. 

    "Thinking in particular about neglected diseases, or poverty-related diseases, we have long accepted that there is a need for alternative models," says Els Torreele, executive director of Medecins Sans Frontieres' Access Campaign. "And in fact for the last 20 years there have been several successful experiments in piloting different ways of doing research and development to ensure drugs are developed even where there's no market incentive."

    That includes ensuring the drugs are affordable and available to those that need them.

    "We've shown it's possible in a not-for-profit way, with public and philanthropic resources, so there's no reason not to do it for 'profitable' disease, or any diseases," says Torreele. 

    But that's still not how we do business today.

  • The Oasis 3DP Brings Open Source Binder Jetting to Makers

    The 2018 Hackaday Prize will soon be wrapping up, and as always, the contest has yielded some wonderfully innovative and promising ideas. One entry, submitted by Yvo de Haas, aims to make binder jetting accessible to everyone. Binder jetting, in which a liquid binding agent is deposited to bind powder particles together, is an effective method of 3D printing whose benefits include not requiring supports. It’s not a technology, however, that is typically accessible to the average maker. De Haas decided to change that with the development of the Oasis 3DP, an open source binder jetting 3D printer that he built himself.

  • An Open Source Toy Synth

    If you thought the future of electronic musical instruments was massive Emerson-class modular synths, giant MPCs with pads the size of Dance Dance Revolution machines, or hilariously expensive polysynths, you couldn’t be more wrong. The future is, effectively, toys. Those tiny little Korgs you can stuff in your pocket are selling like hot cakes, and Pocket Operators are king of the hill. One of the more interesting musical toys is the Organelle, an aluminum enclosure with maple buttons laid out in a keyboard configuration. It’s a synth, it’s a sound engine, and it does produce some interesting noises. All the software is Open Source, but the hardware isn’t. That leaves it up to someone else to make the hardware for the rest of us. That’s exactly what [mitchell] is doing for his Hackaday Prize entry.

  • Hedera Hashgraph Releases Open Source SDK And Announces Final Speaker Lineup For Hedera18 Developer Conference

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Intel's Vulkan Driver Is Working On A NIR Cache

Phoronix - Sob, 10/13/2018 - 11:16
As a possible performance win, Jason Ekstrand as the lead developer of the Intel ANV open-source Vulkan driver has been developing a NIR cache...

Linux in La Frite and Airtame

tuxmachines.org - Sob, 10/13/2018 - 10:08
  • La Frite mini PC by Libre Computer Project from $10

    La Frite is a new open source development board created by the Libre Computer Project which has this week launched via Kickstarter and offers a miniaturised version of the popular Le Potato SBC supported by mainline Linux and Android 8 operating system.

    La Frite is a modern low power mini PC with four 64-bit cores, and can be equipped with up to a gigabyte of DDR4 RAM, supported by ARM Mali GPU powering high definition HDMI. It is loosely based on the Raspberry Pi Model A+ and maintains similar GPIO header arrangement. Connections on the mini PC include 2 x USB ports and Ethernet.

  • Libre Computer’s La Frite is a $20 single board computer ($5 and up during crowdfunding)

    Libre Computer’s latest Linux-friendly single-board computer features a 1.2 GHz ARM Cortex-A53 quad-core processor, ARM Mali-450 graphics, and a target price of $20 when the Le Frite goes on sale at Amazon later this year.

    But folks who pre-order one through the company’s Kickstarter campaign might be able to score one for as little as $5.

  • Libre sets La Frite mini computer board free

    China's Libre Computer has hit Kickstarter for an alternative to the Raspberry Pi Zero called La Frite. Essentially a smaller version of the company's Le Potato computer board, which also launched on Kickstarter last year, the 2.5 x 2.2 inch (6.4 x 5.5 cm) development board is aimed squarely at makers on a tight budget.

  • A $10 Raspberry Pi alternative? La Frite packs Pi-like specs into low-cost Linux board

    The $10 La Frite comes close to matching some key specs of the $35 Pi 3 B+, using the same underlying Arm-based CPU and even offering faster DDR4 memory.

    On paper, the La Frite also promises comparable video playback performance to the Pi 3 B+, can output to 1080p displays via HDMI 1.4, and offers two USB 2.0 ports.

    As you'd expect for the price there are various cutbacks. The board is missing the Pi 3 B+'s Wi-Fi support, and offers a slightly slower wired Ethernet connection than the Pi 3 B+. While the underlying CPU is the same, a quad-core Arm Cortex A53-based processor, the La Frite's CPU runs slightly slower than the Pi's, 1.2GHz compared to 1.4GHz.

  • Airtame raises $1.26 million in crowdfunding for its wireless HDMI dongle. What is it, and what’s next?

    Danish startup Airtame couldn’t have had a better beginning of the year.

    A relatively obscure company that was started in Copenhagen a mere seven months ago, Airtame kicked off a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo at the end of last year to raise a modest $160,000 to help turn its wireless HDMI dongle into a real product.

    What they got is a lot of attention from media and potential customers, the coveted ‘Best Startup of CES 2014’ award from Engadget, and a lot more capital to work with than they had initially anticipated.

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FUD/Openwashing: Lawyers' FUD, Microsoft Openwashing and Facebook Tries to Make Surveillance Seem Ethical

tuxmachines.org - Sob, 10/13/2018 - 09:11
  • Evaluating Open Source Software to Build a Connected Autonomous Vehicle [Ed: Lawyers badmouthing FOSS to attract 'sales']
  • 4 Key Takeaways: Blockchain and Open Source [Ed: As above]
  • Minecraft will be making two of its libraries open source [Ed: So they can call proprietary game "open"]
  • Infer.NET Machine Learning Framework Now Open Source [Ed: MIcrosoft is openwashing a surveillance component used "in a number of Microsoft products in Office, Xbox and Azure."]
  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Skip [Ed: Facebook skips pretence of being "open"]

    Built by a team of veteran open-source contributors within Facebook, Skip is described by the developer team as “a programming language to skip the things you have already computed.” After three years, the project has left active development and has been open sourced.

    The team wrote that the statically-typed language is experimental, with a goal to “explore language and runtime support for correct, efficient memoization-based caching and cache invalidation.”

    [...]

    The team also highlights the project’s support for “efficient and predictable” garbage collection utilizing “a novel approach to memory management that combines aspects of typical garbage collectors with more straightforward linear (bump) allocation schemes,” which minimizes memory scanning by only focusing on memory reachable from the root of a computation.

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GNOME's Nautilus Gets Better Google Drive Support, Warns About Security Risks

tuxmachines.org - Sob, 10/13/2018 - 08:46

The GNOME 3.30 desktop environment is about to get its last scheduled point release, version 3.30.2, which should hit the streets later this month on October 24, and it looks like the Nautilus app was already updated to version 3.30.2, a bugfix release that adds quite a few improvements to the popular file manager.

According to the internal changelog, Nautilus 3.30.2 improves support for opening files stored on Google Drive accounts, improves searching by addressing various crashes, fixes the triple mouse click gesture in the pathbar to minimize the main window, as well as the "/" and "~" characters not opening the location bar.

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Microsoft is Sabotaging PCs Again, Google Has New Laptops/Tablets, Samsung Chromebook

tuxmachines.org - Sob, 10/13/2018 - 08:10
  • Windows 10 Version 1809 Cumulative Update KB4464330 Causes BSODs

    Windows 10 cumulative update KB4464330 for version 1809, as well as cumulative update KB4462919 for the April Update (version 1803), are both pushing a number of HP systems into a BSOD loop, with no easy method to go back to a functional desktop.

  • Pixelbook vs. Pixel Slate: Which Chrome OS Device is the Better Choice?

    As expected, Google announced its first house-branded Chrome OS tablet, the Pixel Slate, a few days ago. It looks like a great device, but how does it compare to the Pixelbook when it comes to a high-end Chrome OS machine?

    Before we get into the comparison, it’s probably worth talking about what this means for current Pixelbook owners. To put it plainly, if you already have a Pixelbook there’s very little reason to consider getting a Slate—it isn’t even an upgrade, but more of a lateral movement from the Pixelbook. It’s an incredibly similar device in a slightly different package.

  • Samsung’s Updated Chromebook Plus V2 Adds LTE Connectivity to an Already-Great Device

    The premium Chromebook market has exploded over the last couple of years, and Samsung helped push that charge with the Chromebook Pro and Plus. It recently revamped the Plus model with updated internals, and now it’s adding LTE to that platform.

    If you’re not familiar with the Chromebook Plus, here’s a bit of backstory for you. The original Chromebook Plus was launched at CES in 2017 alongside the Chromebook Pro. Samsung has since revamped the Plus hardware with an updated processor for improved performance, calling this new version the Chromebook Plus V2. Super original.

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today's howtos

tuxmachines.org - Sob, 10/13/2018 - 08:02
  • Connecting Multiple OpenShift SDNs with a Network Tunnel
  • How to Use Dig Command to Query DNS in Linux
  • How to create missing favicons for your bookmarks in Firefox Quantum for Linux
  • Adventures with coreboot and NVM Express storage

    Let me tell you how I made NVMe SSD support work on the first generation Librem laptops. This story is pretty old, from before the Librem 13 version 2 was even released, so it has been simplified and brought back to the current state of things as much as possible. The solutions presented here have been implemented a long time ago in our coreboot ports, but the technical insights you may derive from this post today should prove interesting nonetheless.

    During internal beta testing of the install script a while ago, we realized that coreboot didn’t work with our NVMe SSDs, as all my testing had been done with a SATA M.2 SSD. I spent some time fixing coreboot so that it would initialize the NVMe SSD, and SeaBIOS so it can boot from the NVMe drive, and then I’ve figured out how to fix the NVMe issues I’ve been having after linux boots.

    The story began with my blog post about the interference of the AMI BIOS with coreboot. What I didn’t mention back then is that after I figured out the issue and managed to unbrick Francois’ Librem, he wasn’t able to boot into his SSD from coreboot because it wasn’t getting detected. I then realized that he had an NVMe SSD and not a SATA SSD.

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Security: Electric-Scooter 'Hacking', Facebook Cracked, National Security Agency (NSA) Looks Into Fuchsia/Android and More

tuxmachines.org - Sob, 10/13/2018 - 07:57
  • Inside the Lawless New World of Electric-Scooter Hacking

    If major corporations and voting infrastructure can be hacked, then it stands to reason that one could also, and much more easily, hack a $400 electric scooter. And in their rush to make dockless, app-enabled two-wheelers a way of life across every urban neighborhood worldwide — while throttling the competition — startups Bird, Lime, Scoot, Skip and Spin have caused localized backlashes while putting their tech at risk of both clever and stupid exploits.

    What’s funny is that the companies tend to dismiss these vulnerabilities as insignificant. Lime’s director of government relations and strategic development, Sam Sadle, told the Dallas Observer this summer that theft and vandalism of scooters is rare because they’re so often in use. Reacting to complaints that hacking has become common, he added: “It hasn’t in any way limited our ability to operate in the markets in which we do operate.”

  • How to Find Out if You Were Affected by the Recent Facebook Hack [Ed: Facebook is almost certainly lying/lowballing the number and far more people got cracked]

    Facebook has now confirmed that hackers stole access tokens for “only” 30 million people, not 50 million. For 15 million of those people, the hackers were able to get phone number, email address, or both. And for 14 million more people, the hackers were able to get a lot more information, like username, gender, relationship status, religious, birthday, and a ton of other information including things you’ve searched for.

  • Facebook Revises Data Breach Impact Downward, Provides New Details
  • Google Fuchsia: Here's what the NSA knows about it

    A while back, Google told us Fuchsia is not Linux. There have also been endless rumors, with little hard proof, it will eventually replace Android. Other than that, we don't know much. But the National Security Agency (NSA), of all groups, has been checking into Fuchsia and revealed its findings at the recent North American Linux Security Summit in Vancouver, B.C.

  • Course Review: Adversarial Attacks and Hunt Teaming

    At DerbyCon 8, I had the opportunity to take the “Adversarial Attacks and Hunt Teaming” presented by Ben Ten and Larry Spohn from TrustedSec. I went into the course hoping to get a refresher on the latest techniques for Windows domains (I do mostly Linux, IoT & Web Apps at work) as well as to get a better understanding of how hunt teaming is done. (As a Red Teamer, I feel understanding the work done by the blue team is critical to better success and reducing detection.)

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New Wine With Graphics Work/Latest Changes, NVIDIA's GPU Work, and Intel's Work on Mesa

tuxmachines.org - Sob, 10/13/2018 - 07:54
  • Wine Announcement
  • Wine 3.18 Brings FreeType Subpixel Font Rendering, Wine Console DPI Scaling

    A new bi-weekly Wine development release is out for those wanting to try the latest Windows gaming on Linux experience (outside of Steam Play / Proton) or running other Windows applications on Linux and other operating systems.

    The key features of Wine 3.18 include sub-pixel font rendering in conjunction with FreeType 2.8.1+, support for the OAEP algorithm within the RSA encryption code, array marshalling fixes in DCOM, improved DPI scaling for the Wine console, and various bug fixes.

  • NVIDIA Accelerates Server Workloads with RAPIDS GPU Software

    GPUs, or Graphics Process Units, are somewhat of a misnomer in the modern age for many of the applications where there are deployed. While GPUs are an important component for graphics, high-end gaming and design, they are also being widely used to accelerate High Performance Computing (HPC) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) workloads.

    This week, NVIDIA announced its RAPIDS open source software for GPUs, alongside multiple partners, including Oracle, HPE and IBM.

  • Intel Whiskey Lake Support Formally Added To Mesa 18.3

    The recently posted patch for Intel Whiskey Lake support in Mesa has now been merged for Mesa 18.3.

    Intel announced Whiskey Lake and Amber Lake in late August. While Intel is usually many months or even years ahead of schedule with their open-source driver enablement for new graphics generations, Whiskey Lake basically comes down to re-branded Coffeelake UHD Graphics... Some of the PCI IDs in fact have already been present in the Intel Linux driver as reserved Coffeelake PCI IDs.

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Ubuntu: Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish , Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo, OpenStack Summit Berlin 2018

tuxmachines.org - Sob, 10/13/2018 - 07:49
  • Ubuntu 18.10 Brings Cosmic Cuttlefish to the Linux Desktop
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E31 – Thirty-One Dates in Thirty-One Days

    This week Ubuntu Podcast debuts on Spotify and re-embraces Mastodon. We’ve been unboxing the GPD Pocket 2 and building a Clockwork Pi. We discuss Plex releasing as a Snap, Microsoft joining the OIN, Minecraft open-sourcing some libraries, Google axing Google+, Etcher (allegedly) not honouring privacy settings, plus we also round up community news and events.

  • OpenStack Summit Berlin 2018

    Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu, is excited to reveal that it will be a headline sponsor at the OpenStack Summit in Berlin.

    The OpenStack Summit has proven itself to be the leading event in open infrastructure, bringing together the builders and operators for sessions and workshops on containers, CI/CD, telecom & NFV, public cloud, multi-cloud and much more.

    Ubuntu is at the heart of the world’s largest OpenStack clouds, in key sectors such as finance, media, retail and telecoms. With Ubuntu the number one platform for OpenStack and public clouds, Canonical is a leader in building and operating multi-clouds.

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Ubuntu Touch OTA-5

tuxmachines.org - Sob, 10/13/2018 - 07:45
  • Ubuntu Touch OTA-5

    Right on the heels of UBport's OTA-4 release comes the official 16.04 version of Ubuntu Touch for mobile devices. This will be the fifth Over The Air update (OTA-5), and it will also be the first of many updates that now adhere to a regular release roadmap.

    While many have already joined the community on 16.04 with OTA-4, in addition to the long-term support of upstream Ubuntu development, OTA-5 will include a more stable experience, new tweaks, and new features to show off this next stage of Ubuntu Touch development.

  • Ubuntu Touch OTA-5 Is Being Prepped With New Browser, Qt Auto Scaling

    The UBports community that continues to maintain Ubuntu Touch for a range of mobile devices will soon be rolling out Ubuntu Touch OTA-5.

    Ubuntu Touch OTA-5 is bringing its new "Morph" web-browser powered by Qt WebEngine to replace the old Oxide-based browser application, support for Qt automatic scaling, Kirigami 2 support, and new community artwork.

  • Ubuntu Touch OTA-5 Is Out for Ubuntu Phones with New Morph Browser, Improvements

    The UBports community announced today that they begin work on the next OTA (Over-the-Air) update for the Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system for Ubuntu Phone devices.

    With the Ubuntu Touch OTA-4 finally rebasing the mobile OS on the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series, the UBports team can now concentrate their efforts on bringing more new features and improvements, which will land in the upcoming Ubuntu Touch OTA-5 release.

    "While many have already joined the community on 16.04 with OTA-4, in addition to the long-term support of upstream Ubuntu development, OTA-5 will include a more stable experience, new tweaks, and new features to show off this next stage of Ubuntu Touch," reads today's announcement.

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Wine 3.18 Brings FreeType Subpixel Font Rendering, Wine Console DPI Scaling

Phoronix - Sob, 10/13/2018 - 01:41
A new bi-weekly Wine development release is out for those wanting to try the latest Windows gaming on Linux experience (outside of Steam Play / Proton) or running other Windows applications on Linux and other operating systems...

Plasma and KDE neon Team Visit Deployments in Catalunya

KDE Dot - Sob, 10/13/2018 - 01:00


KDE members in the impressive foyer at Escola del Treball


Meeting with Pablo of Catalan Generalitat distro Linkat

Last week developers from the KDE neon and Plasma teams visited Barcelona. We were there to meet with some KDE software projects we had heard about in the Catalan government and schools. Aleix Pol lives locally and works on Plasma and Discover. He invited Plasma release manager and KDE neon developer Jonathan Riddell, KDE neon continuous integration master Harald Sitter, and hardware enablement guru Rohan Garg to meet the teams evaluating our software and supporting our users.

We first met Pablo who runs the Linkat project for the Catalan government. Linkat is a Linux distribution they offer to schools, and it currently runs lightweight, simple desktop environments. As Plasma 5 now tends to use as little or less memory and resources than many lightweight Linux desktops, the Linkat team is interested in trying it. We met with the officials from the education department and discussed accessibility needs, looking at Mycroft for voice control and integrating with phones using KDE Connect.


The Escola del Treball is looking for
ways to keep their IT infrastructure
current, while at the same time
cutting costs

The next day we visited the largest technical school in Catalunya, the Escola del Treball (school of the workers). Within their impressive Gaudí-inspired building, they run a few thousand computers on which they are trying to reduce the costs. They showed us the setup they had developed using thin clients with a simple Atom computer or Raspberry Pi. The thin clients use a remote desktop protocol to talk to virtual machines on a central server. The technically-minded teachers can customize what's running on the virtual machine with a range of distributions and operating systems available. Their server has hosted over 3000 virtual machine images just on the trial computers, all for the individual use cases of the teaching staff. Unlike with proprietary setups, this means they do not have to ask for a budget to install software.

They discussed some problems their virtual machine software was having with Plasma and tested some fixes made by Aleix. Rohan was also interested in finding the best machines they could use for their thin clients.

In the evening, we met with developer Angel Docampo and talked about the deployment he worked on for the Ajuntament (city council) of Barcelona. The Ajuntament is also interested in moving towards Free Software on their computers. This deployment is based on Kubuntu, and it is currently in trial by about 30 employees. Angel reported that they are happy with the setup; however, taking it further will likely depend on the politicians‘ will to drive the change forward.

As we were about to leave, we learned about a project called openUAB at the Autonomous University of Barcelona. They are making a KDE neon-based system for their own uses. We expect to find out more about this project after Aleix meets with them in the upcoming weeks.

This was an exciting trip that opened our eyes to the increasing number and variety of users and use cases of KDE software. The insights we collected will help us deliver better software, and strengthen the bonds between our community and the rest of the world.

Red Hat: Open Source Is A Great Business

tuxmachines.org - Pet, 10/12/2018 - 23:12

For years I've heard enthusiasts talking about the open source potential: “It will take over the proprietary code.” Others argued that open source was a value destroyer for businesses relying on intellectual property.

The years went by, and in my mind, open source remained more of a hobbyist thing than anything else. However, the state-of-affairs seldom remains unchanged for long, and the truth is the open source development model, during the last fifteen years, silently morphed by focusing on enterprise IT services.

In my opinion, that was the way to go. Enterprises were more willing to experiment in new IT solutions. And in some cases, they desperately needed those advances to survive. Some companies, with critical systems, needed the flexibility to patch adapt or correct code in-house. On the other end of the spectrum, the regular user that freaks out when an error message pops-up, was never going to mass-adopt something that is far from being a final polished product. Linux and open source are not for them, as Apple explored through gorgeous plug-and-play solutions.

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Red Hat News and Views

tuxmachines.org - Pet, 10/12/2018 - 23:09

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Happy birthday, KDE: 11 applications you never knew existed

tuxmachines.org - Pet, 10/12/2018 - 20:50

The Linux desktop environment KDE celebrates its 22nd anniversary on October 14 this year. There are a gazillion* applications created by the KDE community of users, many of which provide fun and quirky services. We perused the list and picked out 11 applications you might like to know exist.

Also: LaKademy 2018 – First Day (October 11th)

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Mozilla: Pocket, Rust and MDN Updates

tuxmachines.org - Pet, 10/12/2018 - 20:43
  • Pocket’s Updated Listening Feature Effectively Turns Web Pages into Podcasts

    The read-it-later service has been focused on convenience and entertainment since Mozilla acquired it last year. Previous updates to the app introduced sponsored and recommended content based on a user’s interest. The new “listen” feature mimics the button layout and usability of podcast and music apps, encouraging users to treat Pocket like a source of entertainment, rather than a glorified bookmark app.

  • Announcing Rust 1.29.2

    The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.29.2. Rust is a systems programming language focused on safety, speed, and concurrency.

  • Payments, accessibility, and dead macros: MDN Changelog for September 2018

    We’ve been thinking about the direction and growth of MDN. We’d like a more direct connection with developers, and to provide them with valuable features and benefits they need to be successful in their web projects. We’ve researched several promising ideas, and decided that direct payments would be the first experiment. Logged-in users and 1% of anonymous visitors see the banner that asks them to directly support MDN. See Ali Spivak’s and Kadir Topal’s post, A New Way to Support MDN, for more information.

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Security: Chinese Crackers, Microsoft's Botched New Updates, Latest FOSS Updates

tuxmachines.org - Pet, 10/12/2018 - 20:39
  • Hackers [sic] Are Using Stolen Apple IDs to Swipe Cash in China

    Ant Financial’s Alipay and Tencent Holdings Ltd. warned that cyber-attackers employed stolen Apple IDs to break into customers’ accounts and made off with an unknown amount of cash, in a rare security breach for China’s top digital payments providers.

  • Hackers [sic] loot digital wallets using stolen Apple IDs

    Two Chinese companies are warning customers that [crackers] used stolen Apple IDs to get into their digital payment accounts and steal money.

  • Microsoft October 2018 Patch Slightly Flawed and Unable To fully Rectify Jet Database Engine Vulnerability

    On the 20th of September, Trend Micro’s Zero Day Initiative (ZDI) went public with the information of a remove code execution vulnerability that would allow attackers to use the flawed Jet Database Engine to run macros through Microsoft Office programs and cause malicious activities in the targets computer. We covered this previously, you can read it here.

    Regarding this issue, ZDI released a micro-patch on the 21st September which fixed the vulnerability and urged Microsoft to correct this in the following patch. ZDI then did a review of the October 2018 update by Microsoft and found out that the security flaw while addressed has only limited the vulnerability rather than eliminating it.

  • Security updates for Friday

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