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Kernel: Systemd, DXVK, Intel and AMD

tuxmachines.org - Sob, 06/15/2019 - 16:23
  • Systemd Is Now Seeing Continuous Fuzzing By Fuzzit

    In hoping to catch more bugs quickly, systemd now has continuous fuzzing integration via the new "Fuzzit" platform that provides continuous fuzzing as a service. 

    New this week to systemd is the continuous fuzzing integration where every pull request / push will see some quick checks carried out while on a daily basis will be fuzzed in full for all targets.

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  • DXVK 1.2.2 Brings Minor CPU Overhead Optimizations, Game Fixes

    In time for those planning to spend some time this weekend gaming, DXVK lead developer Philip Rebohle announced the release of DXVK 1.2.2 that will hopefully soon be integrated as part of a Proton update for Steam Play but right now can be built from source.

    While certain upstream Wine developers express DXVK being a "dead end" and are optimistic in favor of piping their WineD3D implementation over Vulkan, for Linux gamers today wanting to enjoy D3D11 Windows games on Linux the DXVK library continues working out splendid with great performance and running many Direct3D games with much better performance over the current WineD3D OpenGL code.

  • Intel 19.23.13131 OpenCL NEO Stack Adds Comet Lake Support

    We've seen the Intel Comet Lake support get pieced together in recent months in the different components making up the Intel Linux graphics stack while the compute-runtime is the latest addition. Comet Lake as a refresher is a planned successor to Coffeelake/Whiskeylake and expected to come out this year as yet more 9th Gen hardware. But Comet Lake should be interesting with rumored 10-core designs. Though with being more processors with Gen9 graphics, the Comet Lake Linux support basically boils down to adding in the new PCI IDs.

  • AMD Wires Its New Runtime Linker Into RadeonSI Gallium3D

    RadeonSI Gallium3D has already shifted over to using this new linker. Making use of the .rodata should help with efficiencies throughout the driver (more details in this forum thread) but at this point is mostly laying the groundwork for more improvements to be made moving forward.

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Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

tuxmachines.org - Sob, 06/15/2019 - 16:21
  • Building IT Transformation Architecture with Red Hat OpenShift

    In the era of mobile applications, business challenges to the enterprise IT organizations are more dynamic than ever. Many enterprises have difficulties responding in time because of the inherent complexity and risk of integrating emerging technologies into existing IT architectures. In this article, I will share my experience on how to utilize Red Hat OpenShift as a “Middle Platform” (中台) for enterprises to construct its bimodal IT architecture with agile, scalable and open strategy.

    In the past year, I have discussed with many corporate customers–especially in the financial services industry–the challenges of digital transformation, and the solutions. Most of their difficulties are coming from “core systems” which have been working for more than 10 years.

  • Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2019-24

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week. Elections voting is open through 23:59 UTC on Thursday 20 June.

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • Copr's Dist-Git

    In Copr, we use dist-git to store sources as well. However, our use case is different. In the past, Copr only allowed to build from URL. You provided a URL to your SRC.RPM and Copr downloaded it and built it. This was a problem when the user wanted to resubmit the build. The original URL very often did not exists anymore. Therefore we came with an idea to store the SRC.RPM somewhere. And obviously, the dist-git was the first idea.

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Software: FreeFileSync, Debian/GSOC, LibreOffice and Lightworks

tuxmachines.org - Sob, 06/15/2019 - 16:19
  • File Synchronization App FreeFileSync Brings Another Update

    File synchronization software, FreeFileSync releases latest update with 10.13.

    FreeFileSync is a folder and file synchronization free software that is available for Linux, Windows and Mac. This software can sync between your devices files and folders and only sync the changed files/directories. That means it can identify the changed files and make sure to transfer those in backup systems.

    Armed with scheduling of transfers, JOB features for sync – this free and open source software is one of the best file sync/ backup software available today.

    FreeFileSync released 10.13 with bunch of big fixes and enhancements.

  • Utkarsh Gupta: GSoC Bi-Weekly Report - Week 1 and 2

    The idea is to package all the dependencies of Loomio and get Loomio easily installable on the Debian machines.

    The phase 1, that is, the first 4 weeks, were planned to package the Ruby and the Node dependencies. When I started off, I hit an obstacle. Little did we know about how to go about packaging complex applications like that.

    I have been helping out in packages like gitlab, diaspora, et al. And towards the end of the last week, we learned that loomio needs to be done like diaspora.

  • Annual Report 2018: LibreOffice Conference

    The LibreOffice Conference is the annual gathering of the community, our end-users, and everyone interested in free office software. Every year, it takes place in a different country and is supported by members of the LibreOffice commercial ecosystem. In 2018, the conference was organized by the young and dynamic Albanian community at Oficina in Tirana, from Wednesday, September 26, to Friday, September 28, the eight anniversary of the LibreOffice project. Here’s a quick video recap – read on for more details…

  • New Lightworks Beta Version 14.6 revision 114986 Now Available on Windows Linux and Mac!

    It is strongly recommended that users backup their project folder before installing any new Beta build of Lightworks.

    We are pleased to announce the second Beta of Lightworks 14.6 which includes many changes based on Forum feedback. Excellent work all round and we are hopeful that this Beta Cycle will be short lived. We hope you enjoy all the features and changes in the latest version which can be found in the : Changelog pages

  • Lightworks 14.6 Remains A Closed-Up Blob, But At Least The Linux Support Continues

    It was nearly a decade ago the high-end, commercial video software editing solution Lightworks announced they would be going open-source but to this day that milestone has yet to be materialized. Lightworks though does continue advancing with their v14.6 release on the horizon and at least their added Linux support continues to be expanded upon.

    EditShare, the company behind Lightworks, really dropped the ball when it came to their open-source plans. All that we've been able to gather over these years is that they hit some complexities with their original open-source plans and aren't committed enough in seeking to work through those issues to make the code public. So at the end of the day Lightworks is still a closed-source non-linear video editor, but at least it's one of the most feature-rich/professional-grade solutions with native Linux support.

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KDE: Site Description Update, Boost and Meeting KDE in València

tuxmachines.org - Sob, 06/15/2019 - 16:15
  • Jonathan Riddell: KDE.org Description Update

    The KDE Applications website was a minimal possible change to move it from an unmaintained and incomplete site to a self-maintaining and complete site. It’s been fun to see it get picked up in places like Ubuntu Weekly News, Late Night Linux and chatting to people in real life they have seen it get an update. So clearly it’s important to keep our websites maintained. Alas the social and technical barriers are too high in KDE. My current hope is that the Promo team will take over the kde-www stuff giving it communication channels and transparancy that doesn’t currently exist. There is plenty more work to be done on kde.org/applications website to make it useful, do give me a ping if you want to help out.

  • Done with boost

    One of the so called pillar of the c++ world, boost, sucks a lot when it comes to documentation, I wouldn’t have to write more than one blog post if they had their documentation in place. It has been almost a month that I have started working on the Magnetic Lasso and I wasted most of the time fighting with boost instead of working on my algorithm. Okay, fine I am getting paid for it, I shouldn’t complain.

  • Meet KDE in València

    During the next days, we’ll be having several sprints in València.

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Linux Devices: Librem, NGD and Commell SBCs

tuxmachines.org - Sob, 06/15/2019 - 16:11
  • Todd Weaver on Digital Trends Live

    I have just had a wonderful conversation with Greg Nibler, from Digital Trends Live, about all kinds of different ways these issues are being tackled. Greg started by asking me to introduce Purism, and why we do what we do.

    Well, we started around 2014 as a Social Purpose Company: we advance social good over maximizing profit. We build laptops, a secure token called a Librem Key, and we are also coming out with the Librem 5: a smartphone that doesn’t run on Android nor IOS, but our own operating system PureOS (the same you get on our laptops). These are available today, with the Librem 5 phone (on pre-order now) coming out in Q3 of this year. Our services—chat, email, social media, VPN—are all standardized protocols, decentralized, with no data retention and end-to-end encrypted. We are going to continue to put out more and more hardware, software, and services as we progress.

    I’m kind of a hardcore geek, both in the hardware and software side—but I also am a digital rights activist, making Purism my dream come true by combining hardware, software and services together, in one convenient package. What is awesome is that our entire team is excited about the exact same thing: making convenient products that respect people. Hardware is a little bit more security-minded and privacy-focused, it is where the hardcore audience is: it really gets down to a trust and verified model. The same happens with software: it all needs to be released.

  • What's up with computational storage

    The advantage of this approach is that the processor can run a standard operating system (Ubuntu Linux), and allows any software that runs on Ubuntu to be used for in situ computing in NGD’s drives. The drive itself can also be used as a standard SSD.

  • Up to 4.3GHz, hexa-core Coffee Lake-H on tap in new 3.5-inch SBC

    Like the earlier Commell SBCs, the LE-37M is accompanied by Windows drivers, but Linux support is mentioned in the manual. The LE-37M is designed for imaging, machine vision, infotainment, medical, and gaming machine applications.

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DXVK 1.2.2 Brings Minor CPU Overhead Optimizations, Game Fixes

Phoronix - Sob, 06/15/2019 - 13:15
In time for those planning to spend some time this weekend gaming, DXVK lead developer Philip Rebohle announced the release of DXVK 1.2.2 that will hopefully soon be integrated as part of a Proton update for Steam Play but right now can be built from source...

How To Test Drive 200+ Linux Distributions Without Ever Downloading Or Installing Them

tuxmachines.org - Sob, 06/15/2019 - 12:56

Basically you browse or search for the Linux distro you want to test (you can also filter the site by the very newest releases) and then click Start. The equivalent of booting up the Live ISO or installer image is streamed to your browser in a separate window via NoVNC, but you can also connect to the system on a locally installed VNC client -- the server's IP address and port are provided after you start your session.

I found I only needed to wait a few seconds for each distribution to load, and occasionally you may enter a queue to manage the server side's bandwidth load. Then you'll have a full two hours to treat the distro as your own. Add or remove software, tweak configuration files, partition and format hard drives, whatever you desire. Once you shut it down, the system is wiped clean.

You'll get a faster and smoother experience running these on your own hardware -- or even from locally installed Virtual Machine software -- but first impressions are everything, and DistroTest is a brilliant way to acquire that first impression!

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Security Leftovers: Patches, FUD, and Management Engine 12 (Intel Back Door)

tuxmachines.org - Sob, 06/15/2019 - 12:35

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Programming: Rust, Python, sphinxcontrib-spelling and More

tuxmachines.org - Sob, 06/15/2019 - 12:30
  • How to generate a usable map file for Rust code - and related (f)rustrations

    Cargo does not produce a .map file, and if it does, mangling makes it very unusable. If you're searching for the TLDR, read from "How to generate a map file" on the bottom of the article.

  • Converting a Python data into a ReStructured Text table

    This probably exist but I couldn’t find it. I wanted to export a bunch of data from a Python/Django application into something a non-coder could understand. The data was not going to be a plain CSV, but a document, with various tables and explanations of what each table is. Because ReStructured Text seems to be the winning format in the Python world I decided to go with that.

  • Python Anywhere: Using MongoDB on PythonAnywhere with MongoDB Atlas

    Lots of people want to use MongoDB with PythonAnywhere; we don't have support for it built in to the system, but it's actually pretty easy to use with a database provided by MongoDB Atlas -- and as Atlas is a cloud service provided by Mongo's creators, it's probably a good option anyway

    If you're experienced with MongoDB and Atlas, then our help page has all of the details you need for connecting to them from our systems.

    But if you'd just like to dip your toe in the water and find out what all of this MongoDB stuff is about, this blog post explains step-by-step how to get started so that you can try it out.

  • Toward a “Kernel Python”

    Prompted by Amber Brown’s presentation at the Python Language Summit last month, Christian Heimes has followed up on his own earlier work on slimming down the Python standard library, and created a proper Python Enhancement Proposal PEP 594 for removing obviously obsolete and unmaintained detritus from the standard library.

    PEP 594 is great news for Python, and in particular for the maintainers of its standard library, who can now address a reduced surface area. A brief trip through the PEP’s rogues gallery of modules to deprecate or remove1 is illuminating. The python standard library contains plenty of useful modules, but it also hides a veritable necropolis of code, a towering monument to obsolescence, threatening to topple over on its maintainers at any point.

    However, I believe the PEP may be approaching the problem from the wrong direction. Currently, the standard library is maintained in tandem with, and by the maintainers of, the CPython python runtime. Large portions of it are simply included in the hope that it might be useful to somebody. In the aforementioned PEP, you can see this logic at work in defense of the colorsys module: why not remove it? “The module is useful to convert CSS colors between coordinate systems. [It] does not impose maintenance overhead on core development.”

  • EuroPython: EuroPython 2019: Warning - Spoiler alert!

    The device was created and designed by Radomir Dopieralski, a long time EuroPython regular and enthusiastic Python device and robotics builder.

    The PewPew is a simplified game console, programmable with CircuitPython, a variant of MicroPython. It comes with a 64 LED display and a set of small buttons to drive the console.

    We will have one device per attendee with training or conference ticket and plan to give them out together with the badges.

  • sphinxcontrib-spelling 4.3.0

    sphinxcontrib-spelling is a spelling checker for Sphinx-based documentation. It uses PyEnchant to produce a report showing misspelled words.

  • Run-Length Encoding

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Screencasts: Manjaro, Enso OS, Endless OS, Dead Cells on Ubuntu

tuxmachines.org - Sob, 06/15/2019 - 12:26

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Systemd Is Now Seeing Continuous Fuzzing By Fuzzit

Phoronix - Sob, 06/15/2019 - 12:26
In hoping to catch more bugs quickly, systemd now has continuous fuzzing integration via the new "Fuzzit" platform that provides continuous fuzzing as a service...

Intel 19.23.13131 OpenCL NEO Stack Adds Comet Lake Support

Phoronix - Sob, 06/15/2019 - 12:13
The Intel open-source/Linux compute stack has added Comet Lake support along with more Icelake PCI IDs in its latest round-up...

Lightworks 14.6 Remains A Closed-Up Blob, But At Least The Linux Support Continues

Phoronix - Sob, 06/15/2019 - 12:01
It was nearly a decade ago the high-end, commercial video software editing solution Lightworks announced they would be going open-source but to this day that milestone has yet to be materialized. Lightworks though does continue advancing with their v14.6 release on the horizon and at least their added Linux support continues to be expanded upon...

It's Becoming Possible To Soft-Disable Intel ME 12 On Newer Motherboards

Phoronix - Sob, 06/15/2019 - 11:47
The past few years there's been the me_cleaner software for disabling and stripping parts of Intel's Management Engine for soft-disabling the notorious bit on modern Intel boards. ME_Cleaner has been making much progress and now there is work pending for being able to disable the newer Management Engine 12 found on more recent Intel motherboards...

FreeBSD 11.3-RC1 Now Available

tuxmachines.org - Sob, 06/15/2019 - 09:01

The first RC build of the 11.3-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Also: FreeBSD 11.3 Release Candidate Brings Different Fixes

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FreeBSD 11.3 Release Candidate Brings Different Fixes

Phoronix - Sob, 06/15/2019 - 05:07
FreeBSD 11.3 is lining up for release in July while this weekend the first release candidate is available for testing...

Astra Linux-based mobile devices to get introduced in Russia

tuxmachines.org - Sob, 06/15/2019 - 03:37

A smartphone and two tablets based on the Astra Linux OS will be introduced in Russia, reports Vedomosti citing a joint statement put out by Mobile Inform Group, the producer of the devices, and of the Astra Linux group. The devices will be aimed at use in extreme conditions. Booking will become possible in September.

The MOG C55AL smartphone will feature a 5.5-inch screen, and the MIG T8AL and MIG T10AK tablets 8 and 10 inch screens, respectively. State institutions, the military, power, oil and gas companies, mining, industry and transport companies are expected to take up the devices.

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